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Vinton County
Vinton County Courthouse in McArthur, Ohio
Vinton County Courthouse in McArthur, Ohio
Official seal of Vinton County
Map of Ohio highlighting Vinton County
Location within the U.S. state of Ohio
Map of the United States highlighting Ohio
Ohio's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 39°15′N 82°29′W / 39.25°N 82.49°W / 39.25; -82.49
Country United States
State Ohio
FoundedMarch 23, 1850[1]
Named forSamuel Finley Vinton
SeatMcArthur
Largest villageMcArthur
Area
 • Total415 sq mi (1,070 km2)
 • Land412 sq mi (1,070 km2)
 • Water2.6 sq mi (7 km2)  0.6%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total12,800
 • Estimate 
(2021)
12,696 Decrease
 • Density31/sq mi (12/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district15th
Websitehttp://www.vintoncounty.com/

Vinton County is a county located in the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2020 census, the population was 12,800,[2] making it the least populous county in the state. Its county seat is McArthur.[3] The county is named for Samuel Finley Vinton, US Representative from Ohio (1823–37, 1843–51).[4]

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 415 square miles (1,070 km2), of which 412 square miles (1,070 km2) is land and 2.6 square miles (6.7 km2) (0.6%) is water.[5]

Waterways

Most of Vinton County is in the Raccoon Creek watershed. Most of the rest of the county, to the west, is in the Salt Creek watershed.[6]

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18509,353
186013,63145.7%
187015,02710.2%
188017,22314.6%
189016,045−6.8%
190015,330−4.5%
191013,096−14.6%
192012,075−7.8%
193010,287−14.8%
194011,57312.5%
195010,759−7.0%
196010,274−4.5%
19709,420−8.3%
198011,58423.0%
199011,098−4.2%
200012,80615.4%
201013,4354.9%
202012,800−4.7%
2021 (est.)12,696[7]−0.8%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
1790-1960[9] 1900-1990[10]
1990-2000[11] 2010-2020[12]

2000 census

As of the census[13] of 2000, there were 12,806 people, 4,892 households, and 3,551 families residing in the county. The population density was 31 people per square mile (12/km2). There were 5,653 housing units at an average density of 14 per square mile (5/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 98.08% White, 0.35% Black or African American, 0.45% Native American, 0.09% Asian, 0.08% from other races, and 0.95% from two or more races. 0.47% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 4,892 households, out of which 34.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.20% were married couples living together, 10.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.40% were non-families. 23.60% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.04.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 26.90% under the age of 18, 8.80% from 18 to 24, 29.00% from 25 to 44, 23.10% from 45 to 64, and 12.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 99.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $29,465, and the median income for a family was $34,371. Males had a median income of $30,936 versus $21,257 for females. The per capita income for the county was $13,731. About 15.10% of families and 20.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.60% of those under age 18 and 13.50% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 13,435 people, 5,260 households, and 3,640 families residing in the county.[14] The population density was 32.6 inhabitants per square mile (12.6/km2). There were 6,291 housing units at an average density of 15.3 per square mile (5.9/km2).[15] The racial makeup of the county was 97.9% white, 0.4% American Indian, 0.3% black or African American, 0.2% Asian, 0.1% from other races, and 1.1% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 0.5% of the population.[14] In terms of ancestry, 17.0% were German, 16.2% were American, 14.2% were Irish, and 7.5% were English.[16]

Of the 5,260 households, 32.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.0% were married couples living together, 12.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 30.8% were non-families, and 26.1% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.54 and the average family size was 3.03. The median age was 39.6 years.[14]

The median income for a household in the county was $34,242 and the median income for a family was $37,409. Males had a median income of $36,598 versus $28,226 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,736. About 17.3% of families and 19.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 25.8% of those under age 18 and 13.3% of those age 65 or over.[17]

Politics

2020 Presidential Election Shaded by City and Township  Trump:      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%
2020 Presidential Election Shaded by City and Township
Trump:      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%

Vinton County is typically a Republican county in presidential elections, having picked the GOP candidate in 12 of the last 16 elections.

United States presidential election results for Vinton County, Ohio[18]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 4,632 76.71% 1,331 22.04% 75 1.24%
2016 3,883 70.09% 1,351 24.39% 306 5.52%
2012 2,856 52.02% 2,436 44.37% 198 3.61%
2008 3,021 53.51% 2,463 43.62% 162 2.87%
2004 3,249 54.81% 2,651 44.72% 28 0.47%
2000 2,720 54.99% 2,037 41.18% 189 3.82%
1996 1,673 34.77% 2,350 48.85% 788 16.38%
1992 1,975 36.83% 2,308 43.04% 1,080 20.14%
1988 2,652 52.19% 2,385 46.94% 44 0.87%
1984 3,041 59.80% 1,990 39.13% 54 1.06%
1980 2,484 49.05% 2,381 47.02% 199 3.93%
1976 2,148 44.33% 2,629 54.25% 69 1.42%
1972 2,725 62.85% 1,537 35.45% 74 1.71%
1968 2,219 52.31% 1,608 37.91% 415 9.78%
1964 1,919 42.30% 2,618 57.70% 0 0.00%
1960 3,043 59.97% 2,031 40.03% 0 0.00%
1956 2,998 61.01% 1,916 38.99% 0 0.00%
1952 2,903 58.86% 2,029 41.14% 0 0.00%
1948 2,323 53.34% 2,016 46.29% 16 0.37%
1944 2,719 59.82% 1,826 40.18% 0 0.00%
1940 3,190 57.03% 2,404 42.97% 0 0.00%
1936 3,056 51.16% 2,902 48.58% 16 0.27%
1932 2,715 50.10% 2,655 48.99% 49 0.90%
1928 2,810 63.75% 1,559 35.37% 39 0.88%
1924 2,244 51.87% 1,838 42.49% 244 5.64%
1920 2,559 54.06% 2,124 44.87% 51 1.08%
1916 1,420 48.75% 1,433 49.19% 60 2.06%
1912 952 31.87% 1,228 41.11% 807 27.02%
1908 1,916 55.10% 1,496 43.03% 65 1.87%
1904 1,994 59.68% 1,286 38.49% 61 1.83%
1900 2,141 56.06% 1,648 43.15% 30 0.79%
1896 2,035 52.43% 1,821 46.92% 25 0.64%
1892 1,710 48.18% 1,743 49.11% 96 2.70%
1888 1,832 48.93% 1,865 49.81% 47 1.26%
1884 1,725 47.94% 1,852 51.47% 21 0.58%
1880 1,700 45.98% 1,992 53.88% 5 0.14%
1876 1,533 45.58% 1,817 54.03% 13 0.39%
1872 1,314 49.31% 1,340 50.28% 11 0.41%
1868 1,499 49.10% 1,554 50.90% 0 0.00%
1864 1,212 47.42% 1,344 52.58% 0 0.00%
1860 1,246 49.39% 1,231 48.79% 46 1.82%
1856 932 43.21% 1,174 54.43% 51 2.36%


Government and infrastructure

Vinton County has a three-member Board of County Commissioners that administers and oversees the various county departments, similar to all but two of the 88 Ohio counties. The elected commissioners serve four-year terms. The elected commissioners are Tim Eberts, Mark Fout, and William Wellman.[19]

Emergency services

The following emergency services, with their locations, serve the county:[20]

Post Offices

There are post offices in the following Vinton County communities:[21]

Utilities

The following utilities serve Vinton County:[22]

Phone, Internet and cable

Frontier

Gas and electricity

Water and garbage disposal

Education

The entire county is served by the Vinton County Local School District which operates the following schools:[23]

Transportation

Highways

Airports

Vinton County has one public airport, the Vinton County Airport (K22I/22I). The runway is a 3725' x 75' asphalt, east–west (09/27) runway with a single intersecting taxiway. Navigation and radio equipment includes a two-light PAPI for runway 27, Pilot Controlled Lighting and UNICOM.[24]

The airport is leased to the Vinton County Pilots & Booster Association by the county, who raise funds to maintain and update the airport. As of 2015, the boosters are raising funds to finance a 2000-foot runway extension and resurfacing project. The airport is equipped to provide basic service to piston-engined general aviation aircraft. Flight instruction services are also available.[25]

Media

Vinton County is served by one local newspaper outlet, the Vinton County Courier, a print newspaper and website.[26]

Tourism

Covered bridges

Mt. Olive Covered Bridge
Mt. Olive Covered Bridge
Ponn Covered Bridge prior to arson
Ponn Covered Bridge prior to arson

There are four covered bridges located around Vinton County. The most famous bridge was the Ponn Bridge, also known as the Humpback Bridge. It was built in 1874 and was the longest one in the county. The bridge's name came from the shape of the bridge and there are only a few 'humpback' bridges left around the world. This bridge was burned down in June, 2013 by arsonists.[27] In 1875, the Mt. Olive Bridge was built by a Civil War veteran named George Washington Pilcher. This bridge is open to foot traffic and goes over the Middle Fork Salt Creek. The Bay Bridge is located on the Vinton County Fairgrounds. It was moved to the fairgrounds in 1967 and is still open to pedestrians. The Cox Bridge was built in 1884. The bridge is open to foot traffic and has a picnic area near it. The Arbaugh Bridge was built in 1871, making it the oldest covered bridge in the county. The bridge is the only one open to vehicles thanks to a grant that allowed for renovations.

State Parks and Recreation Areas

Lake Hope State Park
Lake Hope State Park

There are eight recreation areas in Vinton County. The state parks consist of Lake Alma State Park located in Wellston, Ohio and Lake Hope State Park located in McArthur, Ohio. There are also four state forests consisting of Richland Furnace State Forest, Tar Hollow State Forest, Vinton Furnace State Forest, and Zaleski State Forest.[28] Along with these, there is the Wayne National Forest, which covers many other counties in Ohio besides Vinton County, Raccoon Ecological Management Area located on State Route 160, and the Wellston Wildlife Area and Lake Rupert located on State Route 683. There are also many more public areas within a short distance of Vinton County.[29] Vinton county is more than 70 percent wooded.

[30]

Hocking Hills Region

The Hocking Hills Region is located north of Vinton County. Due to the Hocking Hills’ mainstream popularity, visitors often choose to book lodging in Vinton County to avoid the crowds.[31]

Lake Hope Bike Trails

Lake Hope State Park is located in Vinton and Athens Counties. There are five loop trails in the park ranging from 4.5 miles to 16 miles. The Hope Furnace Trail loop is the shortest of the trails at 4.5 miles. The Sidewinder Loop is 5.5 miles, the Copperhead Loop is 10 miles, and the New Big Loop is 15 miles. The longest of the trails in the Old Big Loop at 16 miles.[32]

Zaleski Backpack Trails

Main article: Zaleski State Forest

There are two trails in Zaleski State Forest, a trail of 23.5 miles and a day trail of 10 miles.[33]

Moonville Rail-Trail

Moonville Rail-Trail is a 16-mile rail trail that follows an abandoned B&O railroad line from Mineral to Zaleski. It gets its name from the ghost town of Moonville and passes through a brick railroad tunnel at Moonville and a wooden railroad tunnel at King’s Hollow. The trail cuts through Zaleski State Forest and goes through many woodlands and wetlands. The Moonville Rail Trail Association, a local nonprofit organization established in April 2001, is currently working to make the trail more accessible by replacing bridges that were removed when the railroad was abandoned in the 1980s. The association meets at 6:30 p.m. every third Tuesday of the month at Hope Schoolhouse on Wheelabout Road.[34]

Quilt barns

Throughout Vinton County, 27 quilt barns are scattered by the roadways. They are located on Vinton County's Quilt Trail.[35]

  • Liberty Star Basket
  • Basket Weave
  • A Pig's Tail
  • Christmas Star
  • Country Farm
  • On Wings of Eagles
  • Corn and Beans
  • Turkey Tracks
  • Maple Leaf
  • Mountains
  • Ohio Star
  • The Fan
  • Follow the Drinking Gourd
  • Summer Winds
  • There's No Place Like Home
  • Pine Tree
  • Mosaic
  • Autumn Sojourn
  • Whirlygig
  • Airplane
  • Cross and Crowns
  • Schoolhouse
  • Farm Friendliness
  • Anvil
  • Shortcut to School
  • Horse Squares
  • V-Block

Events

Wild Turkey Festival

The Wild Turkey Festival is a music festival held in McArthur, Ohio, on the first weekend of May, beginning on the Thursday evening and concluding on the Sunday afternoon. A parade runs through the town on the Saturday night.[36]

Ridgetop Music Festival

Every August, the Ridgetop Music Festival is held at the Vinton County Airport which offers music and airplane rides throughout the festival.[37]

Vinton County Air Show

The air show is held on the third Sunday in September. The show is the biggest free air show in Ohio and includes food and aerial acts.[38]

Midnight At Moonville

Midnight at Moonville is one-day Halloween-themed festival featuring dramatic storytelling, wagon rides, regional craft vendors, souvenirs, historical presentations, and music performances located at the Moonville Tunnel.[39] The 2020 edition of Midnight at Moonville has been cancelled due to COVID-19.[40]

Communities

Map of Vinton County, Ohio with municipal and township labels
Map of Vinton County, Ohio with municipal and township labels

Villages

Townships

[41]

Unincorporated communities

Ghost towns

See also

References

  1. ^ "Ohio County Profiles: Vinton County" (PDF). Ohio Department of Development. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 21, 2007. Retrieved April 28, 2007.
  2. ^ "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: Hamilton County, Ohio". www.census.gov. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 26, 2022.
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  4. ^ "Vinton County data". Ohio State University Extension Data Center. Retrieved April 28, 2007.[dead link]
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on May 4, 2014. Retrieved February 11, 2015.
  6. ^ "State of Ohio GIS Databases". Archived from the original on August 21, 2011. Retrieved March 6, 2011.
  7. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Counties: April 1, 2020 to July 1, 2021". Retrieved June 26, 2022.
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 11, 2015.
  9. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved February 11, 2015.
  10. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 11, 2015.
  11. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved February 11, 2015.
  12. ^ 2020 census
  13. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  14. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2015.
  15. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2015.
  16. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2015.
  17. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2015.
  18. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved May 3, 2018.
  19. ^ "County Commissioners". Vinton County Ohio Homepage. Retrieved May 4, 2014.
  20. ^ "Vinton County: Emergency Services". Retrieved July 23, 2014.
  21. ^ "Vinton County: Postal Offices- Zip Codes". Retrieved July 23, 2014.
  22. ^ "Vinton County: Utilities". Retrieved July 23, 2014.
  23. ^ "Vinton County: Local Schools and Higher Education". Retrieved July 23, 2014.
  24. ^ "AirNav: 22I - Vinton County Airport". AirNav, LLC. Retrieved May 12, 2015.
  25. ^ "About Us: Vinton County Airport". Vintoncountyairport.com. Archived from the original on January 11, 2016. Retrieved May 12, 2015.
  26. ^ http://www.vintondaily.com
  27. ^ "Covered Bridges". Vinton County: Convention & Visitors' Bureau. Archived from the original on July 31, 2014. Retrieved July 28, 2014.
  28. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on September 19, 2020. Retrieved September 8, 2020.((cite web)): CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  29. ^ "Ohio State Parks and Public Recreation Areas in Vinton County, Ohio". Vinton County: Conventrion & Visitors' Bureau. Archived from the original on August 12, 2014. Retrieved July 30, 2014.
  30. ^ Walker, T. "Vinton County CVB - Hocking Hills Visitor Information Centers". Hocking Hills. Retrieved January 9, 2020.
  31. ^ "Hocking Hills Region". Vinton County CVB. Retrieved January 9, 2020.
  32. ^ "Lake Hope Mountain Bike Trail". Vinton County: Convention & Visitors' Bureau. Archived from the original on August 12, 2014. Retrieved July 28, 2014.
  33. ^ "Zaleski Backpack Trail". Vinton County: Convention & Visitors' Bureau. Archived from the original on August 12, 2014. Retrieved July 30, 2014.
  34. ^ Moonville Rail Trail-Vinton County CVB https://vintoncountytravel.com/parks-and-recreation/moonville-rail-trail/
  35. ^ "Quilt Barns". Vinton County: Convention & Visitors' Bureau. Archived from the original on August 22, 2014. Retrieved July 30, 2014.
  36. ^ "Vinton County Wild Turkey Festival". Vinton County: Convention & Visitors' Bureau. Archived from the original on July 19, 2014. Retrieved July 30, 2014.
  37. ^ "Ridgetop Music Festival". Vinton County: Convention & Visitors' Bureau. Archived from the original on August 12, 2014. Retrieved July 30, 2014.
  38. ^ "Vinton County Air Show". Vinton County: Convention & Visitors' Bureau. Archived from the original on June 26, 2014. Retrieved July 30, 2014.
  39. ^ "Midnight at Moonville 2020". Vinton County Convention And Visitors Bureau. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  40. ^ "Midnight at Moonville canceled this year". The Courier. Adams Publishing Group. June 17, 2020. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  41. ^ "Vinton County Township Maps". Retrieved September 8, 2020.

Coordinates: 39°15′N 82°29′W / 39.25°N 82.49°W / 39.25; -82.49