WUBT
WUBT 101.1TheBeat logo.png
Broadcast areaNashville, Tennessee
Clarksville, TN/Hopkinsville, KY
Bowling Green, Kentucky
Frequency101.1 MHz (HD Radio)
Branding101.1 The Beat
Programming
Language(s)English
FormatUrban contemporary
Ownership
Owner
WLAC, WNRQ, WRVW, WSIX-FM
History
First air date
February 27, 1965; 57 years ago (1965-02-27)
Former call signs
  • WRUS-FM (1965–1974)
  • WAKQ (1974–1984)
  • WBVR (1984–1994)
  • WJCE-FM (1994–1997)
  • WJZC (1997–1999)
  • WZTO (1999–2001)
Former frequencies
92.1 MHz (1965–1974)
Call sign meaning
For "The Beat" format
Technical information
Licensing authority
FCC
Facility ID34387
ClassC1
ERP47,000 watts
HAAT393 meters (1,289 ft)
Transmitter coordinates
36°31′36″N 86°41′14″W / 36.52667°N 86.68722°W / 36.52667; -86.68722
Links
Public license information
WebcastListen Live
Website1011thebeat.iheart.com

WUBT (101.1 FM, "101.1 The Beat") is an American Urban contemporary radio station broadcasting in the Nashville, Tennessee market, under ownership of iHeartMedia. Though the station is licensed to Russellville, Kentucky, its studios are located in Nashville's Music Row district and the transmitter site is in White House, Tennessee.

History

The Russellville years

On September 16, 1964, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) authorized South Kentucky Broadcasters, owner of WRUS (610 AM), to build a new FM radio station at 92.1 MHz, to broadcast with 3,000 watts, in Russellville.[1] The station debuted as WRUS-FM February 27, 1965, as a full-time simulcast with its AM sister station.[2]

In 1974, the FCC approved WRUS-FM to increase its effective radiated powee to 100,000 watts on 101.1 MHz, giving it much wider regional coverage. When the upgraded facility went into effect on December 10, 1974, the station changed its call sign to WAKQ and adopted a separate Top 40 format.[3] One result of the new format was that WRUS-FM's extensive coverage of local and regional sports was curtailed.[4] With signal coverage available from Bowling Green to Nashville, the station was listened to by some Nashville sports fans, such as those who wanted to hear coverage of Kentucky Wildcats men's basketball.[5]

After a sale of WRUS and WAKQ in 1978 fell through,[6] the stations were purchased five years later by longtime WRUS-WAKQ sports director Lon Sosh, already a 50 percent partner in the ownership group.[7] The next year, citing health reasons, Sosh sold both stations to Keymarket Communications, a consortium headed by Paul Rothfus of Aiken, South Carolina.[8] The new owners retained Sosh as sports broadcaster and proceeded with the erection of a new, 1,000-foot (300 m) tower to increase the FM's coverage area. One bigger change came from the Rothfus group in the summer of 1984 when the station flipped to country as "The Beaver". Along with this change, the station's callsign was changed to WBVR-FM.[9]

Keymarket later became Target Communications, headed by Donald Alt, who also served as a vice president of the Keymarket group. In 1990, the Amaturo Group purchased WBVR for $6 million (half of that in cash and half in assumption of liabilities), splitting it from WRUS for a time.[10] Meanwhile, Target purchased WCBZ (96.7 FM) in Bowling Green in 1991.[11] Keymarket then bought back WRUS and WBVR in early 1994 for a nominal value of $10.[12]

The move to Nashville and Jazz format

In July 1994, the Beaver brand and format moved to WMJM (the former WCBZ), which became the new WBVR-FM, and to a second station, WVVR in Hopkinsville.[13] Keymarket had simultaneously acquired WLAC and WLAC-FM in Nashville, and the Beaver move freed up the 101.1 facility to gear itself toward Nashville as R&B-formatted WJCE-FM, "The Juice".[14][15] Keymarket was then purchased by River City Media in 1995,[16] and Sinclair Broadcast Group then acquired River City in 1996.[17]

The "Juice" format was dropped in December 1996, with the station stunting with Christmas music for the holiday season before flipping to smooth jazz as "Jazzy 101.1" at the start of 1997. With this switch, the station's callsign was changed to WJZC.[18] Sinclair then unloaded the three Nashville radio stations it had acquired from River City and sold them to SFX Broadcasting in 1997.[19]

Contemporary Christian format

After AMFM Inc. acquired SFX, it flipped WJZC from its satellite-delivered jazz to a contemporary Christian music outlet, branded as "The One" and with the call sign WZTO, on October 1, 1999.[20]

Hip-hop format

On October 12, 2001, the station's call letters were changed to the current WUBT as the station adopted its present urban contemporary format, using the moniker "101.1 The Beat Jamz" (revised to "101.1 The Beat" in 2014); the previous format had failed to garner advertiser support.[21]

Since July 2007, WUBT is home to the Steve Harvey Morning Show in the Nashville market.[22]

See also

References

  1. ^ FCC History Cards for WUBT
  2. ^ "Andy Rector Gives Information On FM At P-TA Meet". News-Democrat and Leader. Russellville, Kentucky. March 25, 1965. p. 15. Archived from the original on February 5, 2022. Retrieved February 5, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ "Stereo rock FM station opens". News-Democrat and Leader. Russellville, Kentucky. December 9, 1974. p. 1. Retrieved February 5, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  4. ^ Turner, Jim (December 18, 1975). "Dropping WAKQ sports format tough for Sosh". News-Democrat and Leader. Russellville, Kentucky. p. A-6, A-7. Retrieved February 5, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  5. ^ Turner, Jim (January 13, 1977). "Logan Countians prove loyalty to University of Kentucky". News-Democrat and Leader. Russellville, Kentucky. p. 7. Retrieved February 5, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ "WRUS sale cancelled". News-Democrat and Leader. Russellville, Kentucky. December 7, 1978. p. 1. Retrieved February 5, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ "Lon Sosh buys radio stations". News-Democrat and Leader. Russellville, Kentucky. February 7, 1983. p. 1. Retrieved February 5, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ "Sosh sells stations to out-of-state firm". News-Democrat and Leader. Russellville, Kentucky. March 22, 1984. p. 1. Retrieved February 5, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ "WAKQ now "The Beaver"". News-Democrat and Leader. Russellville, Kentucky. July 23, 1984. p. 2. Retrieved February 5, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ "Tremont Targets Nashville With $6 Million FM Deal" (PDF). Radio & Records. June 15, 1990. p. 10. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 1, 2021. Retrieved February 5, 2022.
  11. ^ "BG radio stations sign off the air". The Park City Daily News. Bowling Green, Kentucky. December 8, 1991. p. 4-A. Retrieved February 5, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  12. ^ "Transactions" (PDF). Radio & Records. January 14, 1994. pp. 6, 7. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 1, 2021. Retrieved February 5, 2022.
  13. ^ "Where Did 101.1 FM Go?". News-Democrat and Leader. Russellville, Kentucky. July 28, 1994. p. 2. Retrieved February 5, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  14. ^ Stark, Phyllis (July 30, 1994). "Apocalypse Soon, Says Family Radio Chief; Clinton Backs Off Broadcaster Spectrum Tax" (PDF). Billboard. p. 122. Archived (PDF) from the original on September 24, 2021. Retrieved February 5, 2022.
  15. ^ Nash, Francis M. (1995). Towers Over Kentucky: A History of Radio and TV in the Bluegrass State (PDF). ISBN 9781879688933 – via World Radio History.
  16. ^ Zier, Julie A. (April 3, 1995). "River City buys Keymarket" (PDF). Broadcasting & Cable. p. 75. Archived (PDF) from the original on November 8, 2021. Retrieved February 5, 2022.
  17. ^ Smith Amos, Denise (April 12, 1996). "River City Broadcasting Is Sold". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. St. Louis, Missouri. p. 8C, 10C. Retrieved February 5, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  18. ^ Schmitt, Brad (December 12, 1996). "Nashville radio runs outta Juice". The Tennessean. Nashville, Tennessee. p. 3A. Retrieved February 5, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  19. ^ "SFX Acquires Nashville Trio" (PDF). Radio & Records. November 5, 1997. p. 6. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 1, 2021. Retrieved February 5, 2022.
  20. ^ Scully, Michael (October 2, 1999). "Jazzy 101 steps aside for 'the One' Christian format". The Tennessean. Nashville, Tennessee. p. 1E, 6E. Retrieved February 5, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  21. ^ Lawson, Richard (October 13, 2001). "Station converts to hip-hop: FM 101.1 drops Christian format". The Tennessean. Nashville, Tennessee. p. 1E, 4E. Retrieved February 5, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  22. ^ Keel, Beverly (July 8, 2007). "Justin Wilson promises a tax hike in every home". The Tennessean. Nashville, Tennessee. p. A3. Retrieved February 5, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.