WZSR
CityWoodstock, Illinois
Broadcast areaNorthwest Suburban Chicago
Frequency105.5 MHz (HD Radio)
BrandingStar 105.5
SloganYour Music Variety
Programming
FormatHot AC
AffiliationsDial Global
Ownership
OwnerAlpha Media
(Alpha Media Licensee LLC)
WCCQ, WERV-FM, WIIL, WJOL, WKRS, WSSR, WXLC
History
First air date
April 1, 1968 (as WSTK)[1]
Former call signs
WSTK (1968-1974)[2]
WXRD (1974-1984)[2]
WXET (1984-1988)[3]
WAIT-FM (1988-1991)[3]
Call sign meaning
W Z StaR
Technical information
Licensing authority
FCC
Facility ID53505
ClassA
ERP1,600 watts
HAAT173 meters (568 ft)
Transmitter coordinates
42°15′34.00″N 88°21′45.00″W / 42.2594444°N 88.3625000°W / 42.2594444; -88.3625000
Links
Public license information
Profile
LMS
WebcastListen Live
Websitestar105.com

WZSR (105.5 FM, "Star 105.5") is a radio station broadcasting a hot adult contemporary format. Licensed to Woodstock, Illinois, United States, it serves Chicago's northwest suburbs. The station is currently owned by Alpha Media. The station's studios are located behind McHenry County College in Crystal Lake.

History

WSTK

The station began broadcasting on April 1, 1968, and held the call sign WSTK.[1] It was owned by Angelo Joseph Salvi.[2][4] WSTK initially aired middle of the road (MOR) and country music.[4][5] By 1971, the station was airing a country music format full time.[1] The station was taken silent in 1973.[2]

WXRD

In 1974, the station was sold to Mal Bellairs for $95,000 and returned to the air, with its call sign changed to WXRD.[4][2][6] WXRD simulcast AM 850 WIVS in the morning and aired a progressive rock format branded "The Crossroads" the remainder of the day.[4][7][8] By 1980, the station had switched to a MOR format.[9]

In 1981, Bellairs sold the station, along with AM 850 WIVS, to Katy Communications of Elgin for $838,000.[4][10] On October 15, 1982, WXRD became an affiliate of the Satellite Music Network.[11] In the early 1980s, the station aired a top 40 format.[12] WXRD was an affiliate of American Top 40 with Casey Kasem during its top 40 years.[13] By 1984, the station had switched to an adult contemporary format.[14]

WXET

On April 7, 1984, the station's call sign was changed to WXET.[3] WXET aired an adult contemporary format and was branded "Lite Hits 105.5".[15][16][17] The station also carried some Chicago White Sox baseball games.[18] On March 3, 1988, the station was sold to Crystal Lake Radio, along with AM 850 WAIT, for $1.6 million.[19]

WAIT-FM

On November 14, 1988, the station's call sign was changed to WAIT-FM.[3] WAIT-FM simulcast AM 850 WAIT mornings, while adult rock from the 1970s and 1980s aired the rest of the day.[20][21][22] In June 1990, the station adopted a CHR format, airing programming from Satellite Music Network's "The Heat" network.[23] In March 1991, it adopted a classic rock format, which also aired programming from the Satellite Music Network for only 6 months.[24][25] Later that year, the station was sold to Pride Communications, along with AM 850 WAIT, for $2.2 million.[26][27][25]

Star 105.5

In September 1991, the station dropped its short lived classic rock format and returned to its adult contemporary format, and it was branded "Star 105.5".[28][29][30] On October 4, 1991, the station's call sign was changed to WZSR.[3]

In October 2000, NextMedia Group purchased Pride Communications' nine radio stations, including WZSR, for approximately $57 million.[31][32] In 2014, the station was sold to Matrix Broadcasting LLC.[33][34][35]

In April 2019, WZSR was sold to Alpha Media due to Matrix Broadcasting's bankruptcy back in March 2018.[36][37]

References

  1. ^ a b c 1971 Broadcasting Yearbook, Broadcasting, 1971. p. B-68. Retrieved March 19, 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d e History Cards for WZSR, fcc.gov. Retrieved March 19, 2019.
  3. ^ a b c d e Call Sign History, fcc.gov. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  4. ^ a b c d e Ghrist, John R. (1996). Valley Voices: A Radio History. Crossroads Communications. p. 142-147.
  5. ^ 1969 Broadcasting Yearbook, Broadcasting, 1969. p. D-57. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  6. ^ "Ownership changes", Broadcasting. December 17, 1973. p. 66. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  7. ^ "News & Notes: ESPN 1000; Pete McMurray; Dick Biondi; Bob Stern; Kevin Manno; Tribune Media; Tronc; Gregory Pratt; More", Chicagoland Radio and Media. March 7, 2017. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  8. ^ Broadcasting Yearbook 1975, Broadcasting, 1975. p. C-61. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  9. ^ Broadcasting Yearbook 1980, Broadcasting, 1980. p. C-73. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  10. ^ "Changing Hands", Broadcasting. August 10, 1981. p. 62. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  11. ^ "Radio Station WXRD affiliates with Satellite Music Network". The Daily Sentinel. October 15, 1982. Retrieved June 12, 2020.
  12. ^ Broadcasting/Cablecasting Yearbook 1983, Broadcasting/Cablecasting, 1983. p. B-79. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  13. ^ "American Top 40 1983 03 12 List", Internet Archive. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  14. ^ Broadcasting/Cablecasting Yearbook 1984, Broadcasting/Cablecasting, 1984. p. B-85. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  15. ^ Broadcasting/Cablecasting Yearbook 1985, Broadcasting/Cablecasting, 1985. p. B-88. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  16. ^ Chicago Radio Guide. Vol. 1, No. 1. May 1985. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  17. ^ Chicagoland Radio Waves, MediaTies. Summer 1988. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  18. ^ "Calendar", Chicago Tribune. September 10, 1984. Section 4, p. 23.
  19. ^ "Ownership Changes", Broadcasting & Cable. March 21, 1988. p. 70. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  20. ^ "WAIT FM 105.5", Radio Chicago. Fall 1989. p. 30. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  21. ^ Chicagoland Radio Waves, MediaTies. Spring-Summer 1989. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  22. ^ "Chicago Area Radio Stations", Chicago Tribune. March 24, 1989. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  23. ^ Feder, Robert. "Catherine Johns' talk program will start tonight on WLS-AM", Chicago Sun-Times. June 11, 1990. p. 27.
  24. ^ "Format Changes", The M Street Journal. Vol. 8, No. 10. March 11, 1991. p. 1. Retrieved July 30, 2020.
  25. ^ a b Feder, Robert. "WFMT chief resigns for 'personal reasons'", Chicago Sun-Times. May 6, 1991. p. 31.
  26. ^ Lauer, Paula. "Worth the WAIT: After over a year of negotiations...", Chicago Tribune. September 22, 1991. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  27. ^ "Ownership Changes", Broadcasting. p. 62-63. June 24, 1991. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  28. ^ "Format Changes", The M Street Journal. Vol. 8, No. 37. September 16, 1991. p. 1. Retrieved July 30, 2020.
  29. ^ Kening, Dan. "Talk O' the Towns", Chicago Tribune. November 3, 1991. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  30. ^ "The all new Star 105.5". Northwest Herald. September 4, 1991. Retrieved July 27, 2020.
  31. ^ Kirk, Jim. "Suburban Radio Signals Scooped Up By Colorado's Nextmedia Group", Chicago Tribune. July 04, 2000. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  32. ^ "Combos", Broadcasting & Cable. July 9, 2000. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  33. ^ Feder, Robert. "NextMedia buyer embraces local approach", RobertFeder.com. October 10, 2013. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  34. ^ Public Notice Comment – BALH-20131024AMW, fcc.gov. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  35. ^ Application Search Details – BALH-20131024AMW, fcc.gov. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  36. ^ Venta, Lance. "Alpha Matrix Sell Pair In Suburban Chicago", Radio Insight. February 11, 2019. Retrieved March 19, 2019.
  37. ^ "Deal To Transfer WYSO/Dayton From Antioch College To Independent Ownership Filed With FCC", All Access Music Group. April 9, 2019. Retrieved April 9, 2019.