Washington Huskies
Logo
UniversityUniversity of Washington
ConferencePac-12 (primary)
Big Ten (starting August 2, 2024)
Mountain Pacific Sports Federation (indoor track & field)
NCAADivision I (FBS)
Athletic directorPatrick Chun
LocationSeattle, Washington
Varsity teams22
Football stadiumHusky Stadium
Basketball arenaHec Edmundson Pavilion
Baseball stadiumHusky Ballpark
Softball stadiumHusky Softball Stadium
Soccer stadiumHusky Soccer Stadium
Other venuesConibear Shellhouse
Dempsey Indoor
Lloyd Nordstrom Tennis Center
MascotDubs, Harry the Husky
NicknameHuskies
Fight songBow Down to Washington
ColorsPurple and gold[1]
   
Websitegohuskies.com

The Washington Huskies are the intercollegiate athletic teams that represent the University of Washington, located in Seattle. The school competes at the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I level as a member of the Pac-12 Conference.

Washington students, sports teams, and alumni are called Huskies. The husky was selected as the school mascot by the Associated Students of UW in 1922.[2] It replaced the "Sun Dodger", an abstract reference to the local weather that was quickly dropped in favor of something more tangible. The costumed "Harry the Husky" performs at sporting and special events, and a live Alaskan Malamute, currently named Dubs, traditionally leads the football team onto the field at the start of games. The school colors of purple and gold were adopted in 1892 by student vote. The choice was purportedly inspired by the first stanza of Lord Byron's The Destruction of Sennacherib.[3]

On-campus facilities include Husky Stadium (football), Hec Edmundson Pavilion (basketball, gymnastics and volleyball), Husky Ballpark (baseball), Husky Softball Stadium (softball), the Nordstrom Tennis Center, the Dempsey Indoor practice facility, and the Conibear Shellhouse (rowing). Recently added was the Husky Track located just north of the Husky Ballpark. The golf team's home course is at the Washington National Golf Club in Auburn. "Montlake" is used as a metonym for the athletic department and its teams,[4][5] with most on-campus facilities located north of the Montlake Cut and on or near Montlake Boulevard in Seattle.

On August 4, 2023, Washington accepted an invitation to join the Big Ten Conference, effective August 2, 2024.[6]

National championships

1991 Coaches Poll national championship trophy on display inside Husky Stadium

The Washington Huskies have won 9 NCAA team championships, 35 non-NCAA rowing national championships (1 AIAW), and 10 other team national championships. They also claim 2 national championships in college football. The championships are as follows:

NCAA team championships

See also: List of NCAA schools with the most NCAA Division I championships

Sport NCAA Championships[7]
Women's Volleyball 2005
Women's Cross Country 2008
Softball 2009
Women's Golf 2016
Women's Rowing 1997, 1998, 2001, 2017, 2019

Football

Washington claims two national championships in college football: 1960 and 1991.[8]

The 1960 team was selected by the Helms Athletic Foundation following Washington's victory over AP and UPI national champion Minnesota in the 1961 Rose Bowl. In that era, the final wire service polls were taken at the end of the regular season.

The 1991 team finished No. 1 in the Coaches Poll and earned The Coaches' Trophy as well as the NFF MacArthur Bowl and the FWAA Grantland Rice Trophy. The title was split, with the AP Poll selecting Miami (FL).

Year Coach Selector Record Bowl Opponent Result Final AP Final Coaches
1960 Jim Owens Helms Athletic Foundation[9] 10–1 Rose Bowl Minnesota W 17–7 No. 6 No. 5
1991 Don James B(QPRS), BR,[10] DeS, DuS, FN, FWAA, MGR, NCF, R(FACT), SR, UPI/NFF, USAT/CNN 12–0 Rose Bowl Michigan W 34–14 No. 2 No. 1

In addition to their claimed titles, NCAA-designated "major selectors" also selected Washington for 1984 and 1990.[11]

Rowing

Main article: College rowing in the United States § National championships

Sport Championships
Men's Rowing 1923, 1924, 1926, 1933, 1936, 1937, 1940, 1941, 1948, 1950, 1953, 1959, 1964, 1970, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2021, 2024
Women's Rowing 1981, 1982 (AIAW), 1983, 1984, 1985, 1987, 1988

Other

The Huskies won 7 National Rifle Association intercollegiate team championships prior to the introduction of the NCAA Rifle Championship in 1980.

Sport Championships
Men's Rifle* 1925,[12] 1932[13][14]
Women's Rifle 1923, 1924, 1925,[15] 1933,[16] 1934[17]
Men's Skiing 1940, 1941, 1942
* indoor, telegraphic format

Sports sponsored

Men's sports Women's sports
Baseball Softball
Basketball Basketball
Cross country Cross country
Golf Golf
Rowing Rowing
Soccer Soccer
Tennis Tennis
Track and field Track and field
Football Gymnastics
Volleyball
Beach volleyball
† – Track and field includes both indoor and outdoor

The University of Washington sponsors teams in nine men's and twelve women's NCAA-sanctioned sports, plus men's rowing, primarily competing in the Pac-12 Conference, with men's rowing in the Intercollegiate Rowing Association and both track and field programs in the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation.

Baseball

Main article: Washington Huskies baseball

A Huskies pitcher throws to a Stanford batter during a game in 2018
Pacific Coast Conference Championships (2)
1919, 1922
Pacific Coast Conference North Division Championships (8)
1923, 1925, 1926, 1929, 1930, 1932, 1952, 1959
Pac-10 North (6)
1981, 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 1998
Pac-12 Championships (2)
1997, 1998

Men's basketball

Main article: Washington Huskies men's basketball

NCAA Championships
National Champion: (None)
Final Four: 1953
Sweet 16: 1984, 1998, 2005, 2006, 2010
Pac-12 Regular Season Titles (12)
1931, 1934, 1943, 1944 (tie), 1948, 1951, 1953, 1984 (tie), 1985 (tie), 2009, 2012, 2019
Pac-12 Tournament Championships (3)
2005, 2010, 2011

Women's basketball

Main article: Washington Huskies women's basketball

NCAA Championships
National Champion: (None)
Final Four: 2016
Elite Eight: 1990, 2001, 2016
Sweet 16: 1988, 1991, 1995, 2001, 2016, 2017
NWBL (Coast Division) Regular Season Titles (1)
1978
NorPac Regular Season Titles (2)
1985, 1986
Pac-10 Regular Season Titles (3)
1988, 1990(t), 2001(t)
NorPac Tournament Championships (1)
1985

Women's cross country

NCAA Championships (1)
2008
NCAA West Region Championships (6)
1989, 1992, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011
Pac-12 Championships (3)
1989, 2008, 2009

Men's cross country

Pac-12 Championships (1)
1993
West Regional Champions (1)
2015
NCAA Championships
National Champion: (None)
Top Ten: 2015[18]

Football

Main article: Washington Huskies football

The university football team's first game was in 1889.

On November 20, 1903 Chief Joseph and his nephew Red Thunder watched a game that ended 2 - 0, a score on safety and Washington victory, and he concluded that "I saw a lot of white men almost fight today. I do not think this good. I feel pleased that Washington won the game. Those men I would think would break their legs and arms, but they did not get mad. I had a good time at the game with my white friends."[19] This both spirited approval and set a precedent for many victories, as during this period, Washington won 40 games in a row under coach Gil Dobie, currently the second longest winning streak in NCAA Division I-A history.[20] From 1907 to 1917, Washington football teams were unbeaten in 64 consecutive games, an NCAA Division I-A record.[20] In 1916, Dobie finished his remarkable coaching career at Washington with an undefeated 58–0–3 record.

The 1925 team posted an undefeated record but lost to Alabama 21–20 in the Rose Bowl. The 1960 team finished 10–1, under coach Jim Owens, and won its second consecutive Rose Bowl by defeating national champion Minnesota 17–7 (the national champion was declared before the bowl games in 1960). Coach Owens served from 1957 to 1974. Don James became head coach in 1975 and transformed the team into a national power while compiling a 153–57–2 record. James' first successful year was in 1977 with the team quarterbacked by Warren Moon culminating in a 27–20 victory over Michigan in the Rose Bowl. Washington and Michigan played again in the 1981 Rose Bowl, a 23–6 loss. The next year, the Huskies returned to the Rose Bowl and defeated Iowa 28–0, the last Rose Bowl shutout and the only shutout in the past half century. Following a two-year hiatus during which cross-state rival WSU prevented the Huskies from Rose Bowl appearances by defeating them in the last game of the 1982 and 1983 seasons, in 1984 Washington posted an 11–1 record and beat Oklahoma 28–17 to win the Orange Bowl. Senior running back, Jacque Robinson won the MVP award and was the first player to win MVP awards for both the Orange and Rose Bowls.

The 1991 team is considered to be the best Washington Husky football team and among the best in college football history. The team went undefeated, winning against opponents by an average score of 42–9 in regular season, including wins over No. 9 Nebraska, No. 7 California and a 34–14 win over No. 4 Michigan in the Rose Bowl.[21] In 2000, Washington finished with an 11–1 record, and won its seventh Rose Bowl under the leadership of Marques Tuiasosopo.

Washington officially claims two national championships in football: 1960 and 1991.[22] Washington was selected in 1960 by the Helms Athletic Foundation and in 1991 by the Coaches Poll and other selectors.[23][24][25]: 107–109 

National Championships (2)
1960, 1991
Pac-12 titles (18)
1916, 1919, 1925, 1936, 1959 (tie), 1960, 1963, 1977, 1980, 1981, 1990, 1991, 1992 (tie), 1995 (tie), 2000 (tie), 2016, 2018, 2023
Bowl history
18 wins, 17 losses, 1 tie

Men's golf

The men's golf team has won seven Pac-12 Conference championships: 1961, 1963, 1988, 2005, 2009, 2010, 2022. James Lepp won the NCAA (individual) Championship in 2005.

Women's golf

The women's golf team won their first NCAA national championship in 2016 by beating Stanford 3–2.[26] In 1961 Judy Hoetmer won the women's national intercollegiate individual golf championship (an event conducted by the Division of Girls' and Women's Sports through 1981, the first year of the rival NCAA women's golf championship).

Rowing

The University of Washington rowing is a longstanding tradition at the UW dating back to 1899.[27] The Washington men's crew won the gold medal at the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, defeating the German and Italian crews, chronicled in the 2023 film The Boys in the Boat.

The crew's traditional rival has been the other West Coast powerhouse, the University of California Golden Bears.

Men's crew competing in the 2011 Windermere Cup at the Montlake Cut, Seattle
Women's NWRA Open Championships[28]
Varsity Eight: top college finisher – 1971 (2nd overall), 1972 (4th overall)[29]
Novice Eight: 1979
Varsity Four: 1979
Lightweight Eight: 1971, 1972, 1973
Lightweight Four: 1969, 1970, 1973
Women's Collegiate National Champions (NWRA/USRowing) held 1980–1996[28]
Varsity Eight: 1981, 1982,[a] 1983, 1984, 1985, 1987, 1988
Junior Varsity Eight: 1981, 1982,[a] 1983, 1987, 1989, 1994
Varsity Four: 1980
Lightweight Eight: 1980, 1987
Lightweight Four: 1980
  1. ^ a b Simultaneous AIAW championship, the only one conducted.
Women's NCAA Championships (1997, 1998, 2001, 2017, 2019)[28]
Varsity Eight: 1997, 1998, 2001, 2002, 2017, 2019
Junior Varsity Eight: 2002, 2017, 2019, 2021
Varsity Four: 1999, 2000, 2001, 2008, 2017, 2019, 2021
Women's Pac-12 Championships
Varsity Eight: 1977, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2017, 2018, 2021
Junior Varsity Eight: 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2014, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2021
Novice Eight: 1978, 1979, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2005, 2009, 2010, 2013, 2014, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2021
Varsity 4: 1977, 1979, 1981, 1983, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1992, 1994, 1995, 1999, 2000, 2004, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2017, 2018, 2019
Men's IRA Championships[28]
Varsity Eight: 1923, 1924, 1926, 1936, 1937, 1940, 1941, 1948, 1950, 1970, 1997, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2021
Junior Varsity Eight: 1925, 1926, 1927, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1940, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1953, 1956, 1964, 1972, 1993, 1995, 1997, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2015, 2017, 2018, 2021
Freshman Eight/Third Varsity Eight: 1931, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1939, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1953, 1961, 1969, 1997, 2001, 2002, 2006, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2021
Men's National Collegiate Rowing Championship held 1982–1996[28]
Varsity Eight: 1984
Men's unofficial national championships[28]
Varsity Eight: 1933,[a] 1977, 1978, 1981
Men's Pac-12 Championships
Varsity Eight: 1962, 1963, 1965, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2003, 2004, 2007, 2008, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2021
Junior Varsity Eight: 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1970, 1971, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1978, 1979, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1988, 1989, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2015, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2021
Third Varsity Eight: 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2021
Freshman Eight: 1961, 1965, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1988, 1990, 1992, 1994, 1997, 2001, 2002, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2019, 2021
Varsity 4: 1978, 1979, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1993, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2004, 2005, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2021
  1. ^ IRA regatta was not held in 1933 due to the Depression. The first college 2000-meter national championship ever held was conducted in June 1933 by local businessmen on the Olympic course in Long Beach, California, as a substitute. Washington raced both Harvard and Yale for the first time at this event and defeated Yale by eight feet to win the championship.[30]

Men's soccer

Huskies' men's soccer in a huddle during the 2021 season.

Main article: Washington Huskies men's soccer

Pac-12 Championships (13)
1968, 1972, 1973, 1976, 1982, 1983, 1985, 1987, 1992, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2013, 2019, 2020

Softball

Main article: Washington Huskies softball

NCAA Championships (1)
Championships: (2009)
Title games: 1996, 1999, 2009, 2018
Pac-12 Championships (4)
1996, 2000, 2010, 2019

Men's tennis

Pac-12 Championships (39)
1938, 1939, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2005

Women's tennis

Pac-12 Championships
1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997

Volleyball

Main article: Washington Huskies women's volleyball

NCAA Championships (1)
2005
Pac-12 Championships
1980, 2004, 2005, 2013, 2015, 2016

Former sports

Swimming

Photograph of the 1921 swim team by Webster and Stevens

The University of Washington swimming team dates back to 1932 when the men's team was founded. The women's team was founded in 1975. In 2009 the athletic department announced both the men's and women's programs would be eliminated due to a $2.8 million budget cut in the athletic department.[31] In 2000 the it was announced that both the men's and women's team would be cut but an outpouring of mail and phone calls, plus concern in the media about discontinuing the sport, led to a reversal of the decision and both programs were reinstated.[32] In 1975 UW announced it was cutting the men's team, citing financial issues involved in having to implement a new women's program to comply with Title IX and decreasing revenue from a shaky economy and a struggling football team. The men's team was reinstated a couple of months later but with fewer scholarships.[33]

Throughout the history of the swimming programs at UW there were many successful athletes to compete for the huskies. The UW swimming program produced several Olympic medalists. These include Jack Medica, Rick and Lynn Colella, Rick DeMont, Doug Northway, and Robin Backhaus. In the 1970's the men's team had multiple top five finishes at the NCAA championship meet. In 2008, the year before the program was eliminated, the women's team finished 15th while the men's team finished 16th at the NCAA championship.

Wrestling

The men's wrestling team at Washington was cut in 1980. The highlight of the program came in 1972 when UW wrestler Larry Owings defeated Dan Gable of Iowa State in the NCAA 142-pound championship. Gable, a senior competing in his final college match, had been undefeated in seven years and 181 matches of high-school and college wrestling. Gable never would lose again, including in the 1972 Olympics when he was unscored upon on his way to a gold medal. The upset over Gable by Owings was called "one of the most unforgettable moments in the history of the sport and possibly all sport" by The Chicago Tribune.[34]

As a team the Huskies won three Pac-8 championships and finished in the top 10 at the NCAA national meet several times. The Amateur Wrestling News rated Washington among the 20 best college programs of the 1970s.[35]

Notable non-varsity sports

Boxing

Both the men's and women's boxing teams compete in the National Collegiate Boxing Association. The Huskies won the very first NCBA national women's championship in 2014, and won again in 2015 and 2016.[36][37][38]

Rugby

Founded in 1963, the University of Washington Husky Rugby Club plays college rugby in Division 1 in the Northwest Collegiate Rugby Conference against local rivals such as Washington State and Oregon. The Huskies won the Northwest championship in 1996, 2002, 2004 and 2005 and the D1AA Varsity Cup in 2014.[39] The Huskies rugby team is partially funded by an endowment from the alumni association.[40]

Lacrosse

The University of Washington Husky Lacrosse Club plays college lacrosse in the Division 1 of the Men's Collegiate Lacrosse Association (MCLA) against local rivals such as Washington State, Oregon, Oregon St. and Western Washington. The Lacrosse team plays their home games on the IMA fields, and are regularly attended and popular amongst UW students; especially when in-state rival, Washington St. comes into town.[41] The Husky's Lacrosse team is funded by annual dues paid by the players, as well as assistance from the IMA, and fundraisers.

Nickname and mascot

Unveiling image for Dubs II, UW Mascot

In the university's early history, Washington athletic teams were unnamed.[42] Local sportswriters dubbed the varsity teams the "Vikings", "Indians", "Cougars", and other names in their headlines.[42]

Sun Dodgers

On January 28, 1920, the Associated Students of the University of Washington (ASUW) chose the Sun Dodgers as the official nickname of varsity athletic teams at the university.[43] The name ranked first from a list of names submitted to the 3,233 voters.[43]

The Sun Dodgers nickname was suggested by students and sportswriters in November 1919 before coming up for the vote.[42][44] The name was derived from Sun Dodger, a campus humor magazine published by the students, and as a tongue-in-cheek allusion to the city of Seattle's rainy weather.[42][44]

The Sun Dodgers were represented by the mascot Sunny Boy, a 3.5 foot gold-painted wooden statue of a Washington undergraduate standing in front of the university's four columns.[45] After being stolen from a fraternity trophy room and missing for decades, Sunny Boy was rediscovered in South Bend and returned to the Huskies prior to the 1948 game versus Notre Dame.[46]

Seattle newspapers ran joint editorials on December 25, 1921, calling for the retirement of "Sun Dodgers" and proposing "Vikings" as a new nickname for Washington's athletic teams.[47][48] The Seattle Post-Intelligencer wrote that Sun Dodgers "lacks punch" and that "nobody knows what it means, anyway."[47] The new name was said to be supported by head football coach Enoch Bagshaw and professor Edmond S. Meany, among other coaches, athletes, and administrators. The newspapers immediately began using "Vikings" in their headlines.[49]

Upon returning to campus following Christmas vacation, students were surprised to learn that their teams had been renamed without consultation.[50] "Vikings" was quickly abandoned.[50] With "Sun Dodgers" having been found unsuitable, a joint committee of students, coaches, faculty, alumni, and businessmen was assembled in order to choose a permanent name for the university's athletic teams.[50]

Huskies

UW teams were first introduced as the Huskies on February 3, 1922, during the halftime intermission of a basketball game vs. Washington State.[50] The newly christened Huskies beat the Cougars, who adopted their nickname in 1919, by a score of 40–10.

The "Husky" nickname was the selection of the committee formed to replace "Sun Dodger".[50] Other suggested names considered by the committee were "Wolves", "Malamutes", "Tyees", "Vikings", "Northmen", and "Olympics".[50]

The Husky was likely chosen due to its relative ease to draw, short name for use in newspapers at the time, and it represented the ferocity of the athletic program. The ASUW felt that The Husky was a true representation of the Seattle area because many viewed Seattle as the "Gateway to the Alaskan frontier", a phrase dating back to the Alaskan Gold Rush.[51]

Live mascot

Dubs[52] (first of his name) became the Husky mascot in 2009.[53] He is an Alaskan Malamute from Burlington, Washington and was born in November 2008. Following tradition, an online vote was conducted at GoHuskies.com for the name. With more than 20,000 votes cast, "Dubs II" was chosen.[54]

Dubs II was officially unveiled as Dubs' successor on March 23, 2018 (National Puppy Day).[55] He had been selected from a group of 90 puppies to become the 14th live mascot for the University of Washington.[56] Dubs continued to fill in as mascot during the 2018 season, with his final performance leading the team out of the tunnel during Senior Day 2018 (though he later reappeared in a home game against the Oregon Ducks in 2019). Dubs II took over at halftime leading the football team out against the Oregon State Beavers.[57]

Dubs II is present before every home Husky football game.[58]

References

  1. ^ "Color Palette". University of Washington Athletics Brand Identity Guidelines (PDF). April 6, 2021. Retrieved October 18, 2021.
  2. ^ Kugiya, Hugo (June 7, 1994). "Cloud Of Mystery Shades Sunny Boy". The Seattle Times. Retrieved March 11, 2019.
  3. ^ "University of Washington Official Athletic Site - Traditions". University of Washington Athletics. February 3, 1998. Retrieved March 11, 2019.
  4. ^ "Petersen To Step Down, Lake Named New Huskies' Head Coach". Washington Huskies. Retrieved December 2, 2019. I will forever be grateful, honored and humbled to have had the opportunity to coach our fine young men on Montlake for these past six seasons.
  5. ^ Allen, Percy (February 19, 2019). "The Huskies have returned to prominence in the Pac-12, and so has the roar on Montlake". The Seattle Times. Retrieved December 2, 2019.
  6. ^ "Washington Huskies". Washington Huskies. Retrieved August 4, 2023.
  7. ^ "NCAA Championships Summary" (PDF). Retrieved June 6, 2024.
  8. ^ "UW Football National Championships". gohuskies.com. Washington Athletics. December 21, 2020. Archived from the original on December 21, 2020. Retrieved December 21, 2020.
  9. ^ "Huskies Win U.S. Grid Title". The Seattle Times. Los Angeles. Associated Press. January 14, 1961. p. 4. The Helms Athletic Foundation yesterday selected the University of Washington's Huskies as the college football champions of the 1960 season.
    The foundation always withholds its selections until after the New Year's bowl games.
    Washington and Mississippi were the finalists in the Helms selection. The Huskies were selected by a narrow margin. They beat Minnesota in the Rose Bowl and finished the season with a 10-1-0 record.
  10. ^ 1995 NCAA Football Records Book. National Collegiate Athletic Association. 1995. pp. 54–58. Retrieved July 15, 2023.
  11. ^ 2018 NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision Records (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. August 2018. pp. 113–114. Retrieved December 10, 2018.
  12. ^ Written at Seattle. "University Rifle Team Takes National Honors". The Bellingham Herald. Bellingham, Washington. May 27, 1925. Retrieved June 6, 2024. A recheck of the points made in the National Rifle association shows the men's varsity rifle team of the University of Washington to be the national champions. Their score was 2,968 points out of a possible 3,000.
  13. ^ Written at San Francisco. "Huskies Win Rifle Crown". The Pasadena Post. Pasadena. International News Service. May 12, 1932. Retrieved June 6, 2024. University of Washington captured first place in the senior national intercollegiate rifle team matches, Ninth Corps Area Headquarters announced here today. The winning score was 7811. Washington State College won second place with 7732.
  14. ^ Meader, Ren, ed. (1934). "Athletics — Minor Sports — Rifle Team". 1934 Tyee. Associated Students of the University of Washington. p. 97. The men's rifle team, coached by Harold Priest, won the national intercollegiate title in competition with 500 colleges throughout the country, scoring 954 out of a possible 1000 shots.
  15. ^ Carney, Peter P. (July 8, 1925). "Many Colleges Now Have Rifle Teams — Rapid Growth in Educational Institutions During Past Five Years; Title Dispute". Harrisburg Telegraph. National Sports Syndicate. Retrieved June 6, 2024. The women's intercollegiate championship was won by the University of Washington for the second year in succession.
  16. ^ "U.V.M. Co-eds Place Second in National Meet; Trail University of Washington by Six Points in Rifle Match". Burlington Daily News. March 30, 1933. Retrieved June 6, 2024. Women's Intercollegiate Team Championship under auspices of the National Rifle Association [...] Vermont, with a team score of 2970 out of a possible 3000 was six points behind the champion University of Washington five.
  17. ^ Written at Washington, D.C.. "National Rifle Champs for 1934 Announced By Gun Association". The Punxsutawney Spirit. Punxsutawney. December 19, 1934. Intercollegiate Champions — Men's Team: U.S. Naval Academy, 1360 x 1500 — Women's Team: University of Washington, 2972 x 3000
  18. ^ Bruscas, Mike. "Historic Pair Of Top-10s For Huskies At Nationals". gohuskies.com. University of Washington Athletics.
  19. ^ "Chief Joseph watches a University of Washington football game and gives a speech in Seattle on November 20, 1903". Retrieved June 2, 2023.
  20. ^ a b "2014 NCAA Football Record Book" (PDF). NCAA. p. 117. Retrieved October 17, 2014.
  21. ^ Caple, Jim (September 2021). "Unbeatable '91 football team inspires first UW Press book on Husky sports". UW Magazine — University of Washington Magazine. Retrieved October 19, 2023.
  22. ^ "UW Football National Championships". gohuskies.com. University of Washington Athletic Communications Office. Archived from the original on December 21, 2020. Retrieved December 21, 2020. Washington officially claims two national championships in football: 1960 and 1991.
  23. ^ Condotta, Bob (September 27, 2007). "1960 Huskies recognized as champs, at last". The Seattle Times. Retrieved December 8, 2021. the Helms Foundation was an athletic foundation based in Los Angeles that assembled a panel of experts to name national champs for football and basketball before dissolving in 1982.
  24. ^ Jenkins, Dan (September 11, 1967), "This Year The Fight Will Be in the Open", Sports Illustrated, vol. 27, no. 11, Chicago, IL: Time Inc., p. 33, retrieved March 16, 2016, In between the two wire-service polls, in 1948, the Helms Athletic Foundation decided to name a national champion. It also chose to pore back through the years, as Parke H. Davis had done, and name past champions. The director of Helms since its beginning, Bill Schroeder, did the work, and he now heads the committee that selects No. 1 after the bowl games. 'A committee of one – me,' he says.
  25. ^ 2017 NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision Records (PDF). Indianapolis: The National Collegiate Athletic Association. July 2017. Retrieved July 31, 2017.
  26. ^ "Julianne Alvarez's clutch play propels Huskies to first NCAA title". ESPN. Associated Press. May 26, 2016.
  27. ^ Lange, Greg. "Rowing begins at University of Washington on December 15, 1899". History Link. Retrieved February 28, 2017.
  28. ^ a b c d e f "2021-22 Washington Rowing Record Book" (PDF). University of Washington. Retrieved April 8, 2022.
  29. ^ "Private email from USRowing Communications Director, January 10, 2006, Indianapolis, Indiana".
  30. ^ "Husky Crew 1930-39". Washington Rowing Foundation. Retrieved April 17, 2022.
  31. ^ Condotta, Bob (May 2, 2009). "UW axes swimming teams - Budget trimsIt accounts for $1.2 million of needed cuts". The Seattle Times. pp. C1.
  32. ^ Evans, Jayda (August 30, 2000). "Hedges' reversal saves swimming - Washington varsity programs will keep going". The Seattle Times. pp. D1.
  33. ^ Condotta, Bob (May 6, 2009). "Down The Drain". The Seattle Times. p. C1.
  34. ^ Smith, Craig (February 23, 1986). "A Legend Survives – Wrestling Program Died, But Owings' Win Over Gable Lives in Mat Fans' Minds". The Seattle Times.
  35. ^ Newnham, Blaine (July 28, 1990). "Wrestling Interest Spurs Memories of Husky Glory Days". The Seattle Times. pp. B3.
  36. ^ "2014 National Collegiate Boxing Championships". U.S. Military Academy, West Point, New York, United States: CBS Sports Network. April 5, 2014. Retrieved June 3, 2016.
  37. ^ "2015 Tournament Champions". Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  38. ^ "2016 Tournament Champions". Retrieved August 22, 2019.
  39. ^ Husky Rugby Club, About, http://www.huskyrugby.com/p/about.html
  40. ^ This Is American Rugby, Interview with University of Washington coach Kevin Swiryn, December 4, 2012, http://www.thisisamericanrugby.com/2012/12/interview-with-university-of-washington.html#more
  41. ^ UW-WSU Final Score, http://mcla.us/scores/games/12202/
  42. ^ a b c d "New Name For Team". Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Seattle. November 5, 1919. For generations, students and football followers of the Pacific coast have attempted to brand athletic teams of the University of Washington with a nickname. Due to parental negligence the varsity has won and lost unnamed. Now an attempt is going to be made by university students to christen themselves the Sun Dodgers. It is thought that this name will stick. Sport writers in the past have called the varsity everything from Cougars to Vikings, not forgetting Indians and a few more on the way. Sun Dodgers is something unusual though, perhaps, it has not the sanction of the weather man. A monthly magazine, the Sun Dodger, is being published for the students at the university and it is thought this will aid in keeping the name permanent.
  43. ^ a b "Big Vote Marks Student Elections". The Seattle Times. January 29, 1920. students at the University of Washington yesterday cast 3,233 votes in the semi-annual campus elections. [...] Of a list of names submitted to the voters, "Sun Dodgers" was chosen, and this will henceforth be the official designation of varsity athletic teams.
  44. ^ a b "Call 'Em Sun Dodgers". The Spokesman–Review. Spokane. November 9, 1919. Retrieved October 20, 2022. Sun dodgers! That's the name of the University of Washington football team. It has been tacked upon them by the sport writers of Seattle and somewhat accepted by the students, alumni and public. It was derived from the name of a monthly magazine published by the student body. In the past sport writers have called the team everything under the sun and without being abused or arrested.
  45. ^ Marmor, Jon (September 1, 1997). "UW's first mascot was a hunk of wood that got around". Columns. UW Alumni Association. Retrieved October 19, 2022.
  46. ^ Written at South Bend, Indiana. "Sunny Boy Returning to Campus: South Bend Sending Washington Mascot Home". The Seattle Times. Seattle. November 24, 1948. The victim is a three-and-a-half-foot wooden statue which bears the name Sunny Boy. At one time Sunny Boy was the mascot of Washington athletic teams. For the last 23 years he has adorned a South Bend backyard
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  48. ^ "Varsity Teams May Be Named "Vikings"—Sun Dodger Nickname Fails to Take With Washington Students and New Cognomen Is Planned". Seattle Times. December 25, 1921. Retrieved October 20, 2022.
  49. ^ "Kitten Is Out of the Bag—"Sun Dodgers" Explained". Seattle Post–Intelligencer. December 27, 1921. Retrieved October 20, 2022.
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  51. ^ "Mascot History". Washington Huskies. Retrieved October 31, 2023.
  52. ^ "Dubs | University of Washington". admit.washington.edu. Retrieved June 30, 2017.
  53. ^ Goldenshteyn, Maks. "'Dubs' announced as new live UW mascot". The Daily of the University of Washington. Retrieved June 30, 2017.
  54. ^ "Welcome, Puppy Dubs". Go Huskies. Retrieved November 28, 2018.
  55. ^ "Say Hello To Dubs II, UW's New Mascot". Patch.com. March 24, 2018. Retrieved November 28, 2018.
  56. ^ "10/10, would cheer with: UW introduces new live mascot, Dubs II, and he is adorable". Seattle Times. March 23, 2018. Retrieved November 28, 2018.
  57. ^ "Dam Right – Seniors close out 2018 home slate with convincing win". Daily UW. November 17, 2018. Retrieved November 28, 2018.
  58. ^ Pac-12 Networks (August 29, 2016), Washington's live mascot Dubs energizes Husky fans, retrieved June 30, 2017((citation)): CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)