Washington and Old Dominion Railway/Railroad
The former W&OD 57, a General Electric 70-ton diesel–electric switcher locomotive built in 1956, at the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad's Riverside Yard in Baltimore in January 1969.[1]
Overview
HeadquartersWashington, D.C., Arlington, Virginia
Reporting markWOD
LocaleVirginia
Dates of operation1912–1968
Technical
Track gauge4 ft 8+12 in (1,435 mm) standard gauge
Length72 miles (116 kilometres)
Map all coordinates in "Washington and Old Dominion Railroad" using: OpenStreetMap  Download coordinates as: KML

The Washington and Old Dominion Railroad (colloquially referred to as the W&OD) was an intrastate short-line railroad located in Northern Virginia, United States. The railroad was a successor to the bankrupt Washington and Old Dominion Railway and to several earlier railroads, the first of which began operating in 1859. The railroad closed in 1968.

The Railroad's oldest line extended from Alexandria on the Potomac River northwest to Bluemont at the base of the Blue Ridge Mountains near Snickers Gap, not far from the boundary line between Virginia and West Virginia. The railroad's route largely paralleled the routes of the Potomac River and the present Virginia State Route 7 (VA Route 7).

The single-tracked line followed the winding course of Four Mile Run upstream from Alexandria through Arlington to Falls Church. At that point, the railroad was above the Fall Line and was able to follow a more direct northwesterly course in Virginia through Dunn Loring, Vienna, Sunset Hills (now in Reston), Herndon, Sterling, Ashburn and Leesburg.

The line turned sharply to the west after passing through Clarke's Gap in Catoctin Mountain west of Leesburg. Its tracks then continued westward through Paeonian Springs, Hamilton, Purcellville and Round Hill to reach its terminus at Bluemont.

A branch connected the line to Rosslyn. The Washington and Old Dominion Railroad Trail (W&OD Trail), the Bluemont Junction Trail, the Mount Jefferson Park and Greenway Trail, several other trails, Interstate 66 (I-66), and Old Dominion Drive (VA Route 309) have replaced much of the railroad's route.

History

Predecessors of the W&OD (1855–1911)

Library of CongressLewis McKenzie, between 1860 and 1875
Library of Congress
Lewis McKenzie, between 1860 and 1875
A Union Army train running on the line was the focus of a Confederate States Army attack in the 1861 Battle of Vienna, Virginia
A Union Army train running on the line was the focus of a Confederate States Army attack in the 1861 Battle of Vienna, Virginia

Originally incorporated as the Alexandria and Harper's Ferry Railroad, construction on the line began in 1855 by the Alexandria, Loudoun and Hampshire (AL&H) Railroad under the presidency of Lewis McKenzie.[2] Initially intended to cross the Blue Ridge Mountains and the Shenandoah River to reach the coal fields in the western part of Hampshire County, Virginia, that are now within Mineral County, West Virginia, the AL&H began operating to Vienna in 1859 from a terminal near Princess and Fairfax Streets in Alexandria's present Old Town neighborhod.[3]

In 1860, the AL&H reached Leesburg in Loudoun County, with plans to extend the line westward through Hillsborough, Vestal's Gap, Berryville, Winchester and Romney. The line would terminate in Paddy Town (now Keyser, West Virginia), where it would make connections with the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad.[3][4][5][6] Construction may have proceeded pursuant to those plans, as an 1864 Confederate army map shows that the railroad's tracks had passed Leesburg, crossed Catoctin Mountain at Clarke's Gap and passed Hillsborough.[7]

Because of its proximity to Washington, D.C., the line saw much use and disruption during the Civil War.[8] After the war, the name of the line was changed in 1870 to the Washington and Ohio Railroad.[9] After changing its planned route to enable it to cross the Blue Ridge through Snickers Gap rather than the more northerly Vestal's Gap, the railroad extended its line from Leesburg to Hamilton in 1870 and to Round Hill in 1874.[10]

Upon acquisition by new owners in the 1880s, the line's name was changed twice: first to the Washington and Western Railroad in 1882 and in the next year to the Washington, Ohio and Western (WO&W) Railroad.[11] However, the line did not serve Washington, Ohio, or the West.

In 1886, the Richmond and Danville Railroad, whose trunk line travelled between Washington, D.C., and Atlanta with connections to New York City, New Orleans, Mississippi and Florida, leased the WO&W.[12][13] The Richmond and Danville also acquired a branch that paralleled the WO&W while traveling between Manassas and Strasburg, Virginia, where it connected to railroads in the Shenandoah Valley west of the Blue Ridge that the WO&W did not reach (see: Manassas Gap Railroad).[12][13] In 1888, the Richmond and Danville began to operate the WO&W's trains between Washington, D.C., and Round Hill.[12][13]

In 1894, the newly formed Southern Railway absorbed the Richmond and Danville Railroad and acquired the WO&W.[14][15][16] In 1900, the Southern Railway extended the line westward for four miles from Round Hill to Bluemont (formerly Snickersville).[17] The Southern Railway designated the line as its Bluemont Branch.[14][15]

John Roll McLean (1904)
John Roll McLean (1904)
Library of CongressStephen Benton Elkins
Stephen Benton Elkins

By 1908, steam locomotives were hauling Southern Railway passenger trains from the new Union Station in Washington, D.C., to Alexandria Junction (north of old town Alexandria), where they switched to travel westward on the Bluemont Branch.[14] Connecting trains shuttled passengers between Alexandria Junction and the former AL&H terminal in old town Alexandria.[14] On weekends, express trains carried vacationers from Washington to Bluemont and other towns in western Loudoun County in which resorts had developed.[14][15][18]

Meanwhile, in 1906, electric trolleys began to run on the Great Falls and Old Dominion Railroad (GF&OD) northwest to Great Falls from Georgetown in Washington, D.C.[19][20] The line, which John Roll McLean and Stephen Benton Elkins owned at the time, crossed the Potomac River on the old Aqueduct Bridge and passed through Rosslyn. The trolleys then traveled northwest on a double-tracked line through Arlington and Fairfax County to reach an amusement park (trolley park) that the railroad company constructed and operated near the falls.[19]

Maps

Washington and Old Dominion Railway (1911–1936)

Diagram of Washington area trolley lines c. 1920–1925 (enlargeable image showing the Great Falls Division of the W&OD Railway in dark green and the Bluemont Division in light green).
Diagram of Washington area trolley lines c. 1920–1925 (enlargeable image showing the Great Falls Division of the W&OD Railway in dark green and the Bluemont Division in light green).

In 1911, McLean and Elkins formed a new corporation, the Washington and Old Dominion Railway.[21] In that year, they concluded negotiations with the Southern Railway to lease the Southern's Bluemont Branch and to take over all service on the branch on July 1, 1912.[22] The lease excluded the portion of the Southern's route that connected Potomac Yard with the former AL&H terminal in old town Alexandria.[22]

In 1912, the GF&OD became the "Great Falls Division" of the W&OD Railway, while the Southern's Bluemont Branch became a part of the W&OD Railway's "Bluemont Division".[23] The W&OD electrified all of its operations over the next four years, becoming an interurban electric trolley system that carried passengers, mail, milk and freight.[24]

From that time onward, W&OD trains crossed over Potomac Yard on a long trestle constructed earlier for the Southern Railway.[25] In contrast to the Southern Railway's earlier Bluemont Branch service, the W&OD Railway's Bluemont Division did not serve Washington's Union Station.[26]

To join its two lines, the W&OD Railway constructed in 1912 a double-tracked Bluemont Division connecting line that traveled between two new junctions in Arlington: Bluemont Junction on the Alexandria-Bluemont line and Thrifton Junction on the Georgetown-Great Falls line.[22][27] The connecting line passed through Lacey (near the west end of Ballston), crossing on a through girder bridge over a competing interurban electric trolley line, the Fairfax line of the Washington-Virginia Railway (see Northern Virginia trolleys).[28][29] The rival line carried passengers between Rosslyn, Clarendon, Ballston, Falls Church, Vienna and Fairfax City.[30]

The railway's electrification system distributed 650 volts direct current (DC) to its Bluemont Division cars and trains through overhead catenary lines.[31] Single overhead lines carried the Great Falls Division's electricity over its tracks.[32] Stationary and movable electrical substations containing Westinghouse alternating current (AC) to DC converters were located at various points along the railway's routes.[31][33]

The W&OD's main passenger line ran from Georgetown and Rosslyn through Thrifton Junction, Bluemont Junction and westward to Bluemont.[34] However, after crossing the Potomac River from Georgetown, many W&OD passengers transferred in Rosslyn to the trolleys of the competing Washington-Virginia Railway.[35] Most of the W&OD's freight trains ran between Potomac Yard, Bluemont Junction and either Rosslyn or various locations along the Bluemont Division.[34]

In 1923, the W&OD Railway ceased operating from Georgetown when the federal government replaced the aging Aqueduct Bridge with the new Francis Scott Key Bridge.[36] At the same time, the railroad constructed a new passenger station in Rosslyn which became its "Washington" terminal.[36]

The W&OD Railway fell upon hard times in the 1930s during the Great Depression.[37] In 1932, the railway went into bankruptcy and was placed in receivership.[38] The railway also discontinued passenger service between Bluemont Junction and Alexandria during 1932.[39]

In 1934, the railway abandoned operations on the Great Falls Division between Thrifton Junction and Great Falls. The abandoned railway route then became Old Dominion Drive (Virginia State Route 309).[36][40][41] In 1979, the old rail trestle of the Great Falls Division over Difficult Run was demolished after years of carrying automobile traffic on Old Dominion Drive.[42]

Washington and Old Dominion Railroad (1936–1965)

Library of CongressDavis Elkins
Library of Congress
Davis Elkins

In 1936, the Washington and Old Dominion Railroad, a new corporation that Davis Elkins (the son of Stephen Benton Elkins) had created, assumed operation of the remnants of the W&OD Railway, which consisted only of the Railway's Bluemont Division and the portion of the former Great Falls Division that had remained between Rosslyn and Thrifton (which was no longer a junction).[43][44] Shortly thereafter, in 1939, the railroad abandoned the western end of its line, which had connected the towns of Purcellville and Bluemont.[43]

In 1945, the W&OD Railroad acquired ownership of the section of line between Potomac Yard and Purcellville that the W&OD Railway had earlier leased from the Southern Railway.[45] The Southern Railway retained ownership of the easternmost section of the railroad's route, which still connected Potomac Yard to the Southern's freight and passenger stations in old town Alexandria.

During the 1940s, the W&OD Railroad converted all of its lines' operations from electric to diesel or gasoline power.[44][46] The railroad discontinued its electrified passenger service in 1941, but temporarily resumed passenger service during World War II using gas–electric motor cars and cars pulled by diesel–electric locomotives.[47] Passenger and mail service finally ended in 1951; thereafter, the railroad carried only freight.[48] The Chesapeake and Ohio Railway (C&O) purchased the W&OD Railroad in 1956, but did not change the railroad's name.[49]

The 1960s were a decade of decline and closure for the W&OD. The Virginia highway department began negotiations to purchase the Rosslyn spur in 1960 and was trying to buy the mainline as early as 1962 for the construction of a road that was to become Interstate 66 (I-66).[50] In July 1962, the highway department bought the Rosslyn spur for $900,000. In September 1963, the railroad stopped operating to Rosslyn. The railroad removed its tracks between Lacey (south of Washington Boulevard) and Rosslyn by November 1964.[51][52]

Abandonment (1965—1968)

In February 1965, the Commonwealth of Virginia contracted to buy 30.5 miles (49.1 km) of the mainline from Herndon to Alexandria for $3.5 million. The C&O Railway then petitioned the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) for permission to abandon the railroad's remnant. The purchase would eliminate the need to build a grade separation where the railroad crossed the Henry G. Shirley Memorial Highway (now part of Interstate 395 (I-395)) at grade and at another grade separation for I-66. The purchase would also provide 1.5 miles (2.4 km) of right-of-way for I-66, saving the state $5 million.[53]

Business interests in Loudoun County, the Arlington County Chamber of Commerce, various state, county and local officials, railway labor organizations and 21 of the 133 shippers who still used the railroad's freight service opposed the purchase. The Northern Virginia Transportation Commission (NVCC), which was interested in converting the line to a commuter rail service, also opposed the purchase.[53] The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA), which at the time was planning to construct a rapid transit system for the Washington area, tried to postpone the abandonment in the hopes of using part of the right-of-way for transit.[54]

The highway department simultaneously made plans to secretly sell all but 4 miles (6.4 km) of the route to the Virginia Electric and Power Company (VEPCO) (now Dominion Virginia Power), whose transmission lines were running along the railroad's right-of-way.[55] As a result, the highway department would sell to VEPCO the remaining 17.5 miles (28.2 km) of right-of-way, including the 12 miles (19.3 km) north of Herndon. The sale would thus prevent the NVCC from buying the land for mass transit.[56]

In August 1967, transit advocates led by Del. Clive L. DuVal II (Fairfax-Falls Church) and WMATA secured a 60-day postponement of the abandonment while they put together a plan to use the right-of-way for transit.[57] However, according to WMATA general manager Jackson Graham, the estimated cost of using the full right-of-way for commuter rail was $70 million. Because WMATA did not expect the proposed transit line to be able to generate enough ridership to be cost-effective, WMATA rejected that option.[58]

The former W&OD 55, a Whitcomb 75-ton diesel–electric switcher locomotive built in 1950, at the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad's Riverside Yard in Baltimore in January 1969.[1]
The former W&OD 55, a Whitcomb 75-ton diesel–electric switcher locomotive built in 1950, at the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad's Riverside Yard in Baltimore in January 1969.[1]

On November 10, 1967, WMATA announced that it had come to an agreement with the highway department that would give WMATA a two–year option to buy a 5 miles (8.0 km) stretch of the right of way from Glebe Road (Virginia Route 120) to the Capital Beltway (now Interstate 495 (I-495)), where I-66 was to be built. WMATA would operate mass transit in the highway's median strip. WMATA would have a 2-year option to buy the 10 miles (16.1 km) of right-of-way from the Beltway to Herndon for the use of commuter trains, an option that WMATA did not exercise.[59] A last minute offer to buy the railroad at its salvage cost and keep it running that the railroad's customers made was rejected in 1967.[60]

In 1968, the ICC decided to permit the C&O to abandon and sell its line. After initially planning to run their last train on January 30, 1968, a temporary restraining order kept the line open until August 27, 1968.[61] On the last day, B&O switcher 9155 pulled two empty lumber cars to Potomac Yard from the Murphy and Ames Lumber Company siding in Falls Church.[62] On August 30, the railroad shipped its three diesel locomotives to the B&O's Baltimore engine terminal, from which a salvage dealer purchased them.[62] By 1969, the C&O had removed all of its tracks and ties, except for some tracks that were crossing paved roads. In 1974, the railroad's bridge over the Capital Beltway was demolished to enable the highway to be widened.[63]

Legacy

The Virginia highway department retained the section of the railroad's route that crossed the Henry G. Shirley Memorial Highway along the Arlington-Alexandria boundary and the portion of the route in Arlington immediately east of Falls Church, on which it built I–66.[64] WMATA then constructed a part of Washington Metro's Orange Line within the median strip of I-66 on that portion of the railroad's former route.[65]

In 1977, VEPCO agreed to sell to the Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority (NVRPA) (now NOVA Parks) for $3.6 million the portion of its right-of-way that lay west of the Alexandria/Arlington boundary.[64] The NVRPA then incorporated that portion of the right-of-way into its Washington and Old Dominion Railroad Regional Park, within which it constructed the W&OD Trail.[66] NVRPA completed the trail to Purcellville in 1988.[67]

In 1999, Virginia Department of Historic Resources staff determined that the "Washington and Old Dominion Railroad Historic District" was eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP).[68] A 2000 NRHP registration form states that the Historic District is eligible for the listing because the District "is associated with events that have made a significant contribution to the broad patterns of our history". The form contains an in-depth description of the District's historical resources and of the railroad's history, as well as maps that show the locations of the Districts's major historical features.[69]

Herndon Depot, August 2012
Herndon Depot, August 2012
Purcellville Station, August 2008
Purcellville Station, August 2008

On June 18, 1979, the Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service of the United States Department of the Interior added the Herndon depot to the NRHP.[70] On May 28, 2010, the National Park Service added the Purcellville train station to the NRHP.[71] The Virginia Department of Historic Resources has added both stations to the Virginia Landmarks Register.[72]

Bluemont Division, Alexandria-Bluemont line

Stone arch at Clarke's Gap, August 2008
Stone arch at Clarke's Gap, August 2008

Most of the Bluemont Division's passenger cars or trains ran on the W&OD Railway's Great Falls Division's line from Georgetown over the Aqueduct Bridge through Rosslyn to Thrifton Junction. From Thrifton Junction, the trains ran on the Bluemont Division's connecting line to Bluemont Junction, where they met other Bluemont Division passenger cars or trains that ran from Alexandria, following Four Mile Run in Arlington. Some of the Bluemont Division cars or trains then continued their trips through Falls Church, Vienna, Herndon, Sterling, Ashburn, Leesburg, Clarke's Gap and Purcellville to terminate in Bluemont, Virginia, at the base of the Blue Ridge Mountains, following a route that was similar to that of Virginia State Route 7.[73]

After the W&OD Railroad closed, the Southern Railway and its successor, the Norfolk Southern Railway, operated a spur between the Alexandria waterfront and a north-south route that traveled through Potomac Yard before the Yard closed in 1989.[74] The spur formerly served trains traveling from the eastern end of the Bluemont Division to the Southern Railway's freight and passenger stations in old town Alexandria.[74] As the Southern Railway owned and operated the spur and the stations, this section of track remained in operation after the W&OD closed.[74] Railroad operations ended on the spur in 2012–2013 when GenOn Energy's Potomac River Generating Station and the Robinson Terminal's Oronoco Street warehouse closed.[75]

A paved trail in Alexandria's linear Mt. Jefferson Park has replaced part of the Bluemont Division's course through that city.[76] NOVA Parks' 44.6 miles (71.8 km)-long W&OD Trail travels in the Washington and Old Dominion Railroad Regional Park within the Bluemont Division's former right-of-way from the Alexandria/Arlington boundary through Bluemont Junction to Purcellville.[77] The section of the Bluemont Division between Purcellville and Bluemont has not become a part of any trail, as the W&OD Railroad abandoned this section in 1938, thirty years before the remainder of its line closed.

Great Falls Division

Further information: Great Falls and Old Dominion Railroad

In 1906, the 15-mile electrified Great Falls and Old Dominion Railroad (GF&OD) began operating from Georgetown in Washington, D.C. to the present site of Great Falls Park in Virginia. From Georgetown, the railroad crossed the Potomac River on the old Aqueduct Bridge to Rosslyn in Arlington. From Rosslyn, the railroad traveled northwest along the later routes of Lee Highway (U.S. Route 29) and Old Dominion Drive (Virginia State Route 309) until it reached Great Falls. In 1912, the GF&OD became the Great Falls Division of the W&OD, sharing trackage with the W&OD's Bluemont Division between Rosslyn and Thrifton Junction.[78]

Thrifton-Bluemont Junction connecting line

The Thrifton-Bluemont Junction connecting line, a component of the W&OD's Bluemont Division, opened in 1912. The line connected the W&OD's Great Falls Division (formerly the Great Falls and Old Dominion Railroad) with the Bluemont Division's Alexandria-Bluemont line.

The line closed in sections in 1963 and 1968.[79] I–66 and the adjacent Custis Trail replaced the line between Thrifton and Washington Boulevard in Ballston. Arlington County's Bluemont Junction Trail replaced the line between Washington Boulevard and Bluemont Junction.

Bluemont Junction, where the Bluemont Junction Trail now meets the W&OD Trail, presently contains an Arlington County railroad display that features a Southern Railway bay window caboose.[80] The caboose was built in 1971, three years after the W&OD Railroad closed.[81]

Surviving Locomotives

At least four locomotives that the W&OD had owned or leased still survived in 2017.

IATR 50 (former W&OD 50) and IATR 54 in Mason City, Iowa, in 2009
IATR 50 (former W&OD 50) and IATR 54 in Mason City, Iowa, in 2009

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b (1) Locomotive described in Harwood, p. 137.
    (2) Coordinates of Riverside Yard in Baltimore: 39°16′05″N 76°36′22″W / 39.268118°N 76.606029°W / 39.268118; -76.606029 (Riverside Yard in Baltimore)
  2. ^ Williams, p. 3.
  3. ^ a b Harwood, pp. 12—15.
  4. ^ Williams, p. 4.
  5. ^ (1) 1859 map showing the planned route of the Alexandria, Loudoun, and Hampshire Railroad between the Washington, D.C. area, Leesburg, Winchester, Romney and Paddy Town: Mitchell, S. Augustus (1859). "Railroad map of the eastern, western and northern states, and Canada, showing conspicuously the lines of communication between the ports of the Atlantic and the great west and north west". Philadelphia: Mitchell's Map Publication Office. LCCN 98688326. OCLC 42763387. Retrieved July 23, 2020 – via Library of Congress.
    (2) c. 1860 map showing the route of the Alexandria, Loudoun, and Hampshire Railroad (A.L.&.H. R.R.) between the town of Alexandria and Leesburg, with mileages of stations from Alexandria: Blythe, Washington (c. 1860). "Map of Alexandria, Fairfax, Prince William, Stafford, and Portions of the Adjacent County's". LCCN 80693560. OCLC 6533537. Retrieved January 25, 2020 – via Library of Congress.
  6. ^ Union and Confederate Army maps showing planned route of Alexandria, Loudoun and Hampshire Railroad through Vestal's Gap and Winchester:
    (1) "Part of Map of portions of the military depts of Washington, Pennsylvania, Annapolis, and North Eastern Virginia. Compiled in the Bureau of Topographical Engr. War Department &c, July 1861". LCCN 2002627436. Archived from the original on May 27, 2019. Retrieved May 27, 2019 – via Library of Congress. Library of Congress note: "Probable Confederate copy of Bureau of Topographical Engineers original."
    (2) Clark, John S. (September 15, 1862). "Part of Map of portions of the military depts of Washington, Pennsylvania, Annapolis, and North Eastern Virginia. Compiled in the Bureau of Topographical Engr. War Department &c, July 1861. Washington, D.C., 1862". LCCN 99448520. OCLC 45872041. Archived from the original on May 27, 2019. Retrieved May 27, 2019 – via Library of Congress.
    (3) Bureau of Topographical Engineers (September 17, 1862). "Part of Map of portions of the military depts of Washington, Pennsylvania, Annapolis, and North Eastern Virginia. Compiled in the Bureau of Topographical Engineers, War Department &c, July 1861". Washington, D.C. LCCN 99447370. OCLC 45489352. Archived from the original on May 27, 2019. Retrieved May 27, 2019 – via Library of Congress.
    (4) Sheppard, William L., Engineer Bureau, Confederate States of America (copier) (September 6, 1864). "Part of Map of portions of the military depts of Washington, Pennsylvania, Annapolis, and North Eastern Virginia". Compiled in the Bureau of Topographical Engineers, War Department, Washington, D.C., October 6, 1863". LCCN 2002627442. OCLC 52747761. Archived from the original on May 27, 2019. Retrieved May 27, 2019 – via Library of Congress.
  7. ^ 1864 Army of Northern Virginia map showing tracks of the Alexandria, Loudoun and Hampshire Railroad (unlabeled) passing Leesburg, crossing Catoctin Mountain at Clarke's Gap and passing Hillsborough: "Northern Virginia with adjacent parts of Maryland and West Virginia". 1864. LCCN 2006627692. OCLC 70282038. Retrieved July 25, 2020 – via Library of Congress. Copied by J. Paul Hoffman, Topl. Office A.N. Va.; Approved, S. Howell Brown, 1st Lt. Engs: Troops, In Chg: Topl. Dept., A.N. Va., March 23rd 1864.
  8. ^ (1) Williams, pp. 8–10.
    (2) "Photograph of United States Military Railroad locomotive (Clarke) (formerly of the Alexandria, Loudoun & Hampshire Railroad) at roundhouse in Alexandria during the Civil War". Archived from the original on November 7, 2005.
  9. ^ (1) Harwood, p. 21.
    (2) The Washington and Ohio Rail Road Company (1873). "The Washington and Ohio Railroad. A Glance at the country through which it passes, between Washington D.C., and the Ohio River, a distance of 325 miles". Philadelphia: Collins, Printer. Retrieved July 24, 2019 – via Internet Archive.
  10. ^ (1) Williams, p. 27.
    (2) Harwood, p. 20—22.
  11. ^ Williams, pp. 27–28.
  12. ^ a b c (1) 1882 system map of Richmond and Danville Railroad Archived May 31, 2014, at the Wayback Machine
    (2) 1893 system map of Richmond and Danville Railroad
  13. ^ a b c (1) Harwood, p. 24.
    (2) Williams, p. 28.
  14. ^ a b c d e Williams, pp. 42–43.
  15. ^ a b c Harwood, p. 26.
  16. ^ "1895 system map of Southern Railway". Archived from the original on November 11, 2009.
  17. ^ Falknor, Susan Freis (March 11, 2008). "History of Bluemont - Railroad days". Welcome to Bluemont: Articles. Bluemont, Virginia: Bluemont Citizens Association. Archived from the original on June 24, 2019. Retrieved January 19, 2020.
  18. ^ "Complete Schedule Between Washington and Bluemont". Southern Railway Company. May 28, 1911. Cite journal requires |journal= (help) at Harwood, p. 29.
  19. ^ a b Harwood, pp. 33–41.
  20. ^ Williams, pp. 44, 71.
  21. ^ Harwood, p. 45.
  22. ^ a b c Harwood, p. 46.
  23. ^ Harwood, pp. 46, 49.
  24. ^ Williams, pp. 45, 72.
  25. ^ (1) Harwood, pp. 32, 46–47.
    (2) "W&OD bridge over Potomac Yard north of the Yard's St. Asaph station" (photograph). Archived from the original on October 22, 2018. Retrieved October 22, 2018 – via Pinterest.
  26. ^ Williams, pp. 43–44.
  27. ^ Williams, p. 72.
  28. ^ Williams, pp. 107, 144, 156.
  29. ^ ""Lacey Car Barn" marker". HMdb.org: The Historical Marker Database. Archived from the original on October 14, 2017. Retrieved October 14, 2017. In 1896, the Washington, Arlington & Falls Church Railway began running electric trolleys from Rosslyn to Falls Church on the present routes of Fairfax Drive and I-66. By 1907, the line linked downtown Washington to Ballston, Vienna, and the Town of Fairfax. In 1910, the railway built at this location a car barn, rail yard, workshop, electrical substation, and general office. In 1912, the rival Washington & Old Dominion Railway began crossing the tracks on a bridge 200 yards west of here, traveling the present route of I-66 from Rosslyn. The line to Fairfax closed in 1939, but Metrorail's Orange Line follows its route through Arlington.
  30. ^ (1) Harwood, pp. 31, 33.
    Washington—Virginia Railway system map (c. 1915). Washington—Virginia Railway Company (publisher). In "Figure 18: A map of the electric train line" (PDF). South Railroad Street Park Master Plan: General Management Plan and Conceptual Development Plan. Fairfax County Park Authority. September 27, 2006. p. 19. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 7, 2019. Retrieved January 20, 2020.
  31. ^ a b Harwood, pp. 48–49.
  32. ^ Harwood, pp. 39, 48–49.
  33. ^ Williams, pp. 70–71.
  34. ^ a b Harwood, p. 47.
  35. ^ Harwood, p. 38.
  36. ^ a b c (1) Williams, p. 74.
    (2) Harwood, pp. 68–69.
  37. ^ (1) Williams, pp. 74, 93.
    (2) Harwood, pp. 73–79.
  38. ^ (1) Williams, p. 93.
    (2) Harwood, p.73.
  39. ^ Harwood, p. 76.
  40. ^ Harwood, pp. 77–78.
  41. ^ King, 1934 (map)
  42. ^ Hanson, Christoper (April 9, 1979). "A Rusted Old Trestle Falls, A Relic of the Car Era". The Evening Star.
  43. ^ a b Harwood, pp. 79–80.
  44. ^ a b Williams, p. 91.
  45. ^ (1) Harwood, p. 90.
    (2) Williams, p. 94.
  46. ^ Harwood, pp. 83–84.
  47. ^ (1) Harwood pp. 81, 83–88, 137–138.
    (2) Williams, pp. 93–94.
  48. ^ (1) Harwood, pp. 90–91
    (2) Williams, p. 95.
  49. ^ (1) Harwood, p. 97.
    (2) Williams, p. 96.
  50. ^ (1) "Senate Enacts W.& O.D. Bill". The Washington Post. March 9, 1960.
    (2) Dewar, Helen (January 21, 1962). "Virginia Drops Plan To Buy W&OD Line". The Washington Post.
  51. ^ "Rail Spur Quiet for While: But the Old W&OD Route Soon Will Hum With Autos". The Washington Post. November 16, 1964.
  52. ^ "W&OD Rail Spur Bought by State". The Washington Post. July 10, 1962.
  53. ^ a b (1) "ICC Examiner Favors Death of W&OD Line". The Washington Post. March 8, 1966.
    (2) "Want W&OD to Stay". The Washington Post. March 17, 1965.
    (3) Douglas, Walter B (February 9, 1965). "Railroad Agrees to Sell Right of Way to Virginia". The Washington Post.
  54. ^ Flor, Lee (August 30, 1967). "Delay of Transit Talk May Bear on W&OD".
  55. ^ (1) Harwood, pp. 106–107.
    (2) Williams, p. 109.
  56. ^ "Secret Deal Disclosed on W&OD Line". The Washington Post. March 10, 1966.
  57. ^ (1) "DuVal Asks Salvaging Of W&OD". The Washington Post. June 21, 1967.
    (2) Jay, Peter A. (August 2, 1967). "Transit Unit Wins Delay In Rail Case". The Washington Post.
  58. ^ (1) "Law to Save W&OD Rails To Be Sought". The Washington Post. September 13, 1967.
    (2) "Two Steps Advance Accord on Transit". The Washington Post. September 9, 1967.
  59. ^ (1) Corrigen, Richard (November 2, 1967). "WMATA Agrees On Rail Bed Route". The Washington Post.
    (2) "Ailing Va. Railroad Allowed to Quit in '68". The Washington Post. January 25, 1968.
  60. ^ "Plant Owners Along W&OD Again Try to Keep Line Going". The Washington Post. November 20, 1967.
  61. ^ (1) McLaughlin, Maureen (January 30, 1968). "Judge's Order Delays Closing of W&OD". The Washington Post.
    (2) "W&OD Limping to Extinction". The Washington Post. August 3, 1968.
  62. ^ a b Harwood, p. 106.
  63. ^ (1) Yarbrough, Charles (November 4, 1969). "Dulles Seen as Our Savior". The Washington Evening Star.
    (2) Braaten, David (April 7, 1974). "Bridge Taking a Hike". The Washington Evening Star.
    (3) Beckham, Nancy (June 12, 1970). "Old Station at End of Line". Washington Evening Star.
  64. ^ a b Harwood, pp. 106–107.
  65. ^ Harwood, p. 112.
  66. ^ Harwood, pp. 108–109.
  67. ^ Harwood, p. 109.
  68. ^ (1) Ezell, Raymond (Virginia Department of Transportation Fredericksburg District) (February 29, 2012). "Archaeological Survey: Proposed Sycolin Road Overpass of Route 7/15 Bypass Leesburg, Loudoun County, Virginia: Management Summary" (PDF). Virginia Department of Transportation. p. 2. Archived (PDF) from the original on September 27, 2012. Retrieved January 26, 2020.
    (2) Dutton + Associates, LLC., Midlothian, Virginia (October 2016). "VDHR #053-0276: Washington & Old Dominion Railroad Historic District (Eligible)" (PDF). Pre-Application Analysis for Cultural Resources of the Idylwood Substation at Shreve Road Project. Virginia State Corporation Commission. p. 5-1. Archived (PDF) from the original on January 26, 2020. Retrieved January 26, 2020.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
    (3) Schlupp, Catherine; Staton, Heather Dollins (Dovetail Cultural Resource Group, Fredericksburg, Virginia) (October 2016). "Phase IB Architectural Survey of the Proposed Soapstone Connector, Fairfax County Virginia" (PDF). Fairfax County, Virginia government. p. 5. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 26, 2018.
    (4) "Transform I-66 Inside the Beltway: Eastbound Widening Environmental Assessment: Architectural Phase I Survey Report" (PDF). United States Department of Transportation: Federal Highway Administration and Virginia Department of Transportation. November 2016. p. 7. Archived (PDF) from the original on January 26, 2020. Retrieved January 26, 2020.
  69. ^ Neville, Ashley M. (Gray & Pape, Inc., Richmond, Virginia) (July 25, 2000). "United States Department of the Interior: National Park Service: National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Washington & Old Dominion Railroad Historic District (Virginia Department of Historic Resources (DHR) No. 053-0276)" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on January 26, 2020. Retrieved January 26, 2020. In Appendix J of Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority - Pre-filed Direct Testimony of Mr. Hafner, Mr. Mcray and Mr. Simmons, November 30, 2005 (Part 4), Case No. PUE-2005-00018, Virginia State Corporation Commission. Obtained in "Case Docket Search". Virginia State Corporation Commission. Retrieved September 28, 2017.
  70. ^ (1) David, Elizabeth S., Historic Preservation Planner, Fairfax County Office of Comprehensive Planning (April 1979). "Herndon Depot" (PDF). United States Department of the Interior: National Park Service: National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form. Richmond, Virginia: Virginia Department of Historic Resources. Archived (PDF) from the original on January 28, 2021. Retrieved July 23, 2010.
    (2) "Herndon Depot: National Register Information System ID: 79003039". NPGallery Digital Asset Management System. United States Department of the Interior: National Park Service. Retrieved January 28, 2020.
    (3) Greenberg, Ronald M. (Acting Chief, National Register of Historic Places). "Virginia: Herndon. Herndon Depot, Elden St." (PDF). Federal Register: March 18, 1980: Part II: Department of the Interior: Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service: National Register of Historic Places; Annual Listing of Historic Properties. 45 (54): 17484. Retrieved January 28, 2020.
    (4) "Herndon Depot". National Register of Historic Places: Virginia – Fairfax County. National Register of Historic Places.com. Archived from the original on September 6, 2015. Retrieved January 28, 2020.
  71. ^ (1) Kalbian, Maral S; Peters, Margaret T. (November 20, 2009). "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form (United States Department of the Interior: National Park Service): Purcellville Train Station" (PDF). Richmond, Virginia: Virginia Department of Historic Resources. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 27, 2018. Retrieved October 27, 2018. and accompanying five photos
    (2) Director, National Park Service (June 4, 2010). "Weekly list of actions taken on properties for the National Register of Historic Places: 5/24/10 through 5/28/10" (PDF). National Register of Historic Places 2010 Weekly Lists. United States Department of the Interior: National Park Service. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 28, 2019. Retrieved January 28, 2020.
    (3) "Purcellville Train Station: National Register Information System ID: 10000307". NPGallery Digital Asset Management System. United States Department of the Interior: National Park Service. Retrieved January 28, 2020.
    (4) "Purcellville Train Station". National Register of Historic Places: Virginia – Loudoun County. National Register of Historic Places.com. Archived from the original on February 18, 2017. Retrieved January 28, 2020.
  72. ^ (1) "235-0001 Herndon Depot". Richmond, Virginia: Virginia Department of Historic Resources. August 29, 2018. Archived from the original on January 16, 2021. Retrieved January 28, 2020.
    (2) "286-5001-0233 Purcellville Train Station". Richmond, Virginia: Virginia Department of Historic Resources. January 22, 2020. Archived from the original on September 27, 2020. Retrieved January 28, 2020.
  73. ^ (1) Williams, p. 43.
    (2) Washington and Old Dominion Railway timetables:
    Bluemont Division: Williams, pp. 40, 68.
    Great Falls Division: Williams, p. 67.
  74. ^ a b c Harwood p. 112.
  75. ^ (1) Sullivan, Patricia (September 29, 2012). "GenOn power plant in Alexandria is set to close". Local. The Washington Post. Archived from the original on June 15, 2018. Retrieved June 15, 2018.
    (2) Sullivan, Patricia (September 25, 2013). "Sale of Robinson Terminal warehouses to bring development to Alexandria waterfront". Local. The Washington Post. Archived from the original on June 15, 2018. Retrieved June 15, 2018.
  76. ^ Stone, Jim. "The Washington & Old Dominion Railroad in Del Ray". Alexandria, VA: Del Ray Citizens Association. Archived from the original on March 29, 2008. Retrieved January 17, 2010.
  77. ^ Harwood, pp. 108–109, 112.
  78. ^ Harwood, pp. 39-46.
  79. ^ Harwood, pp. 101, 106.
    (2) Williams, pp. 107, 131.
  80. ^ (1) "Bluemont Junction Caboose". Arlington County, Virginia: Arlington County Department of Parks and Recreation. Archived from the original on March 4, 2021. Retrieved March 13, 2021.
    (2) "Bluemont Junction Park". Arlington County, Virginia: Arlington County Department of Parks and Recreation. Archived from the original on March 4, 2021. Retrieved March 13, 2021.
    (3) "Events Set for Third Annual Arlington Neighborhood Day". News Release. Arlington County, Virginia government. October 16, 1999. Archived from the original on September 28, 2013. Retrieved March 4, 2013. Several park events have been planned as well, including dedication of the Bluemont Junction Caboose and Railroad Display at Bluemont Park ....
    (4) Coordinates of caboose at Bluemont Junction:38°52′23″N 77°07′57″W / 38.87306°N 77.132564°W / 38.87306; -77.132564 (Bluemont Junction caboose)
    (3) Coordinates of intersection of Bluemont Junction Trail and Washington and Old Dominion Railroad Trail: 38°52′19″N 77°07′56″W / 38.8718317°N 77.1321047°W / 38.8718317; -77.1321047 (intersection of Bluemont Junction Trail and Washington and Old Dominion Railroad Trail)
  81. ^ Copy of Southern Railway records in album inside Bluemont Junction caboose.
  82. ^ a b c d e "Rolling Stock of the Utah State Railroad Museum: Cargill 6751: SW1". Utah State Railroad Museum: Spencer S. & Dolores Doré Eccles Rail Center. Ogden, Utah: Ogden Union Station. 2018. Archived from the original (photograph) on September 3, 2018. Retrieved October 31, 2018. This locomotive began life as Baltimore & Ohio 213, and later became B&O 8413. It was sold to Arco Petroleum in Carson, California, and renumbered 8417, then later Arco 6971. Sold to General American Tank Car (GATX) in Colton, California, keeping the same number. Cargill purchased the unit from Western Railway Supply, a used equipment dealer, and moved it to Ogden in August 1993 for use at the company’s Globe Mill. In 2010 it was replaced by a Trackmobile, and Cargill donated it to the museum. It was delivered on May 21, 2011, free of charge thanks to Utah Central and Union Pacific. It is one of the first SW1s to be built, and when sold to the B&O was classified as an NS1.
    While out of service at the elevator, vandals stripped the wiring from the traction motors, as well as from inside the cab which remained unlocked. Cargill funded the complete repainting and restoration of the locomotive to operation. Painting was completed in November 2011. Located on Track 1.
  83. ^ a b c d e Harwood, p. 137.
  84. ^ Van Cleve, Jeff (July 4, 1996). "Cargill 6751" (photograph). RR Picture Archives.net. Ogden, Utah. Retrieved December 20, 2013. Archived October 29, 2018, at the Wayback Machine.
  85. ^ a b c "Pictures of CRGX 6751" (photographs). RR Picture Archives.net. November 27, 2020. Retrieved November 27, 2020. Archived November 27, 2020, at the Wayback Machine.
  86. ^ (1) "Cargill EMD SW1 #6751" (photograph). Utah State Railroad Museum Locomotives. Retrieved June 7, 2019. Archived June 7, 2019, at the Wayback Machine.
    (2) "Cargill EMD SW1 #6751" (photograph). rgusmrail.com. March 1, 2019. Retrieved June 7, 2019. This SW1 unit was built by EMD in 1940 as #213 for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. The unit was subsequently renumbered BO #8413. It was sold to Arco Petroleum at Carson, CA, where it was renumbered #6971. It next went to the locomotive leasing company General American Transportation Corporation at Colton, CA. After the lease expired, the unit was stored at the GATX facility until it was sold through the dealer, Western Railway Supply, to Cargill. It moved to the Horizon Milling Company in Ogden in mid August 1993 and was repainted, lettered and renumbered #6751. It was replaced by a Trackmobile in 2010. Donated to the Utah State Railroad Museum in April 2011, it was moved to Union Station on 21st May 2011. Archived June 7, 2019, at the Wayback Machine.
    (3) Daniels, Roger (June 27, 2020). "CRGX 6751(SW1)" (photograph). RR Picture Archives.net. Ogden, Utah. Retrieved November 27, 2020. Archived November 27, 2020, at the Wayback Machine.
  87. ^ (1) Kerr, James (November 20, 2009). "Columbia & Reading ALCO S2 CORY 2-26" (photograph). RailPictures.Net. Frank Sahd Salvage Center, Columbia, Pennsylvania. Retrieved January 28, 2014. Archived February 3, 2014, at the Wayback Machine.
    (2) k41361 (February 24, 2010). "Columbia & Reading S2.AVI" (video). Retrieved June 29, 2016. Video of CORY 2-26 crossing Route 262 in Columbia, Pennsylvania. Archived June 29, 2016, at the Wayback Machine.
    (3) "Columbia & Reading Railway No. 2-26" (photograph). Green Initiatives. Columbia, Pennsylvania: Sahd Metal Recycling. Retrieved December 20, 2013. Archived September 27, 2013, at the Wayback Machine.
    (4) Walker, Craig (September 27, 2013). "Columbia & Reading ALCO S2 CORY 2-26" (photograph). RailPictures.Net. Columbia, Pennsylvania. Retrieved January 28, 2014. Tucked away in a scrap yard in Columbia, Pennsylvania, is Columbia & Reading S2 2-26. This 1946-built Alco has put in the miles for a number of railroads, starting with the Chesapeake & Ohio (#5015, then #9165) followed by stints as GEX 106, FCIN 106, PVRR 27, CCCR 27 and JCNX 27. Archived 2015-06-04 at the Wayback Machine.
    (5) "Pictures of CORY 2-26" (photographs). Columbia, Pennsylvania: RR Pictures Archive.Net. Retrieved December 23, 2017. Archived December 23, 2017, at the Wayback Machine.
    (6) Central PA Locos (April 26, 2014). "CORY 2-26" (photographs). Pictures of CORY 2-26. Columbia, Pennsylvania: RR Pictures Archive.Net. Retrieved May 25, 2015. Archived May 25, 2015, at the Wayback Machine.
    (7) Darnell, Tim (July 28, 2016). "CORY 2-26" (photograph). Pictures of CORY 2-26. Columbia, Pennsylvania: RR Pictures Archive.Net. Retrieved January 27, 2017. Archived January 27, 2017, at the Wayback Machine.
    (8) Painter, Kevin (October 27, 2017). "CORY 2-26(S2)" (photograph). Pictures of CORY 2-26. Columbia, Pennsylvania: RR Pictures Archive.Net. Retrieved December 23, 2017. Archived December 23, 2017, at the Wayback Machine.
    (9) Painter, Kevin (February 13, 2019). "CORY 2-26(S2)" (photograph). Pictures of CORY 2-26. Columbia, Pennsylvania: RR Pictures Archive.Net. Retrieved June 7, 2019. Archived June 7, 2019, at the Wayback Machine.
    (10) "HD Columbia and Reading ALCO S2 2 26 around Columbia,PA" (video). Alex Gillespie Rail Productions. February 14, 2019. Retrieved November 27, 2020 – via YouTube. (9:38 minutes)
    (11) Painter, Kevin (January 21, 2020). "CORY 2-26 (S2)" (photograph). Pictures of CORY 2-26. Columbia, Pennsylvania: RR Pictures Archive.Net. Retrieved November 27, 2020. Archived November 27, 2020, at the Wayback Machine.
  88. ^ (1) Harwood, pp. 131, 137.
    (2) 1941 and 1946 photographs of W&OD 47: Harwood, pp. 83, 88.
  89. ^ a b c "GE 44-Ton Number 30" (photographs). Number 30. The Fonda Johnstown & Gloversville Railroad. Retrieved June 29, 2016. Photographs of the former W&OD 47 as FJGRR 30, on the Great Western Railway of Colorado and as BJRY 44. Archived August 8, 2016, at the Wayback Machine.
  90. ^ Zygmunt, Chris (June 8, 2012). "BJRY 44" (photograph). LocoPhotos: Comprehensive Locomotive Archiving. Burlington, Iowa: Jack Hilton. Archived from the original on September 18, 2014. Retrieved September 17, 2014. Lineage: ex GWR 44, ex Cargill, ex FJG 30, ex WOD 47
  91. ^ a b (1) Zygmunt, Chris (June 8, 2012). "Burlington Junction Railway No. 44 (with 2013-02-24 comment by Jack M. Jakeman: "This was the locomotive that the railroad was started with.")" (photograph). RailPictures.Net. Burlington, Iowa. Retrieved December 20, 2013. Archived December 21, 2013, at the Wayback Machine.
    (2) Zygmunt, Chris (June 8, 2012). "BJRY 44" (photograph). LocoPhotos: Comprehensive Locomotive Archiving. Burlington, Iowa: Jack Hilton. Archived from the original on September 18, 2014. Retrieved September 17, 2014. Lineage: ex GWR 44, ex Cargill, ex FJG 30, ex WOD 47
    (3) "Profiles of Railroads Operating in Iowa". Rail System Plan: Appendix A. Ames, Iowa: Iowa Department of Transportation. Retrieved September 17, 2014. Archived February 5, 2012, at the Wayback Machine.
  92. ^ (1) Lewis, Edward A. (1996). Burlington Junction Railway. American Shoreline Railway Guide (5th ed.). Waukesha, Wisconsin: Kalmbach Publishing Company. p. 53. ISBN 0890242909. LCCN 96215170. OCLC 35286187. Retrieved December 23, 2017 – via Google Books.
    (2) Miller, Gerry; Sink, Tom; Zygmunt, Chris (June 8, 2012). "Photographs of BJRY 44" (photograph). RailPictures.Net. Burlington and West Burlington, Iowa. Retrieved December 17, 2014. Archived October 30, 2013, at the Wayback Machine.
    (3) Rumbut, Kris (September 11, 2014). "BJRY 44" (photograph). Pictures of BJRY 44. Burlington, Iowa: RR Pictures Archive.Net. Retrieved May 25, 2015. Archived May 25, 2015, at the Wayback Machine.
    (4) Mackey, Dan (August 5, 2018). "BRJY 44" (photograph). Burlington, Iowa: Flickr. Archived from the original on June 7, 2019. Retrieved June 7, 2019.
    (5) Zygmunt, Chris (June 8, 2012). "BJRY 44" (photograph). LocoPhotos: Comprehensive Locomotive Archiving. Burlington, Iowa: Jack Hilton. Archived from the original on September 18, 2014. Retrieved September 17, 2014. Lineage: ex GWR 44, ex Cargill, ex FJG 30, ex WOD 47
  93. ^ (1) Harwood, pp. 68, 135.
    (2) Blake, Henry W.; Bozell, Harold V., eds. (June 25, 1921). "Manufacturers and the Markets: Rolling Stock". Electric Railway Journal. New York: McGraw-Hill Company, Inc. 57 (28): 917. ISSN 0095-9715. OCLC 2021289. Retrieved September 28, 2017 – via Google Books. Description of 50-ton Baldwin-Westinghouse electric locomotive purchased by the Mononghahela Valley Traction Company, Fairmont, West Virginia, circa 1921 and similar to W&OD 50.
    (3) 1922 and 1940 photographs of W&OD 50: Harwood, p. 71.
    (4) Rice, Leonard. "W&OD electric freight locomotive 50 in the Rosslyn shop yard" (photograph). Archived December 24, 2013, at the Wayback Machine. In McCray, Paul. "Washington & Old Dominion Railroad, 1847 to 1968: A Photographic History". Retrieved December 2, 2015. Archived December 10, 2015, at the Wayback Machine.
    (5) Guillaudeu, 2013, p. 114. "This photograph from March 25, 1944, is one of the last images of Locomotive No. 50 in use on the W&OD Railroad. ... (Photograph by Leonard W. Rice.)"
  94. ^ a b Harwood, p. 135.
  95. ^ (1) Harper, James P. (April 7, 1947). "Washington & Old Dominion 50 at Cedar Rapids, IA" (photograph). Don's Rail Photos. Don Ross Group. Retrieved September 18, 2014. Archived October 23, 2012, at the Wayback Machine.
    (2) Ross, Don (September 25, 1954). "CR&IC 58 at Cedar Rapids, IA" (photograph). Don's Rail Photos. Don Ross Group. Retrieved September 18, 2014. Archived 2012-10-23 at the Wayback Machine.(3)
  96. ^ (1) Harwood, p. 135.
    (2) Ross, Don (March 1960). "Kansas City Kaw Valley 507 at Bonner Springs, KS" (photograph). Don's Rail Photos. Don Ross Group. Retrieved September 18, 2014. Archived October 23, 2012, at the Wayback Machine.
    (3) McDowell, Mark (May 1, 1960). "Motor 507 switching Lone Star Cement, 1960" (photograph). Pictures of KVW 507. Bonner Springs, Kansas: RR Pictures Archives.net. Retrieved November 2, 2020. Archived November 2, 2020, at the Wayback Machine.
  97. ^ (1) the_trainman407 (July 14, 2012). "IATR 50" (photograph). RailPictures.Net. AGP Ethanol Plant, Mason City, Iowa. Retrieved December 23, 2017. Iowa traction number 50 is a 50-ton steeplecab, built by Baldwin-Westinghouse in 1920 as Washington & Old Dominion Number 50. It was acquired by the Cedar Rapids & Iowa City in 1947, was rebuilt and renumbered number 58. In 1955 it was sold to the Kansas City-Kaw Valley Railroad and became their number 507. Finally, in 1962 it was sold to the Iowa Terminal and renumbered 53, later becoming IATR 50. The unit is seen here switching out Mason City's AGP plant Archived December 23, 2017, at the Wayback Machine.
    (2) "Iowa Traction Railway Locomotive Roster". Iowa Traction Railway. American-Rails.com. 2020. Retrieved November 2, 2020. Builder: Baldwin-Westinghouse; Model Type: Steeple Cab; Road Number: 50; Notes: Built as Washington & Old Dominion #50 in October, 1920. Acquired by the Cedar Rapids & Iowa City (Crandic) in 1947 as #58 and sold again to the Kansas City Kaw Valley Railroad (KCKV) in 1955 as #507. Finally, it was purchased by the Iowa Terminal in 1962, and renumbered #50 a year later. Archived September 20, 2020, at the Wayback Machine.
    (3) Ross, Don (October 22, 1962). "Iowa Terminal RR 50 at Mason City, IA" (photograph). Don's Rail Photos. Don Ross Group. Retrieved September 18, 2014. Archived October 22, 2012, at the Wayback Machine.
    (4) Schneider, Lynn (June 28, 1980). "Iowa Terminal RR 50 at Mason City, IA" (photograph). Don's Rail Photos. Don Ross Group. Retrieved September 18, 2014. Archived October 23, 2012, at the Wayback Machine.
    (5) Rueber, James (May 24, 1986). "IAT 50 at Mason City, IA" (photograph). Don's Rail Photos. Don Ross Group. Retrieved September 18, 2014. Archived October 23, 2012, at the Wayback Machine.
    (6) Menge, George (September 3, 1992). "IATR 50 at Emery, IA" (photograph). Don's Rail Photos. Don Ross Group. Retrieved September 18, 2014. Archived October 22, 2012, at the Wayback Machine.
    (7) Richards, John (December 2001). "Iowa Traction RR 50 at Mason City, IA" (photograph). Don's Rail Photos. Don Ross Group. Retrieved September 18, 2014. Archived October 23, 2012, at the Wayback Machine.
    (8) Blaszczyk, Andrew (September 24, 2008). "IATR 50" (photograph). RailPictures.Net. Mason City, Iowa. Retrieved September 18, 2014. Archived September 18, 2014, at the Wayback Machine.
    (9) R., Ryan; R., Jim (March 15, 2010). "IATR 50" (photograph). RailPictures.Net. Mason City, Iowa. Retrieved December 21, 2017. Archived December 21, 2017, at the Wayback Machine.
    (10) "Pictures of IATR 50" (photograph). RR Pictures Archive.net. Retrieved May 25, 2015. Archived May 25, 2015, at the Wayback Machine.
    (11) "Pictures with BLW Serial No 53784 in them: Locomotive IATR 50 (Steeple Cab)" (photographs). RR Pictures Archive.Net. Retrieved May 25, 2015. Archived September 24, 2015, at the Wayback Machine.
    (12) Guillaudeu, 2013, p. 115 Photograph legend: "A railfan pretends to operate the Class B Baldwin-Westinghouse Locomotive No. 50 on September 20, 2009, where it is still in use on the Iowa Traction Railroad, almost 90 years after it was finished, in February 1921."
  98. ^ Videos of IATR 50 in operation:
    (1) jfreelan1964 (September 16, 2010). "Iowa Traction Empty Gondola Movement" (video). Retrieved December 21, 2017 – via YouTube. (14:39 minutes)
    (2) jfreelan1964 (September 16, 2010). "Iowa Traction Scrap Metal Arrives at the UP Interchange" (video). Retrieved December 21, 2017 – via YouTube. (12:04 minutes)
    (3) Chicagojoe28 (July 31, 2015). "Iowa Traction RR: The Last Electrified freight in the US" (video). Retrieved December 21, 2017 – via YouTube. (10:40 minutes)
    (4) airailimages (August 1, 2015). "Iowa Traction Action - 27 July 2015" (video). Retrieved December 21, 2017 – via YouTube. (4:42 minutes)
    (5) jfreelan1964 (February 3, 2017). "Iowa Traction Railway Winter 2016" (video). Retrieved December 21, 2017 – via YouTube. (23:49 minutes)
  99. ^ (1) "Progressive Rail acquires Iowa Traction Railroad". ProgressiveRailroading.com. October 16, 2012. Retrieved November 13, 2012. Archived December 22, 2013, at the Wayback Machine.
    (2) "Freight Tariff IATR 9001" (PDF). Iowa Traction Railway Company. October 4, 2012. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 22, 2013. Retrieved December 20, 2013.
    (3) Nelson, Jacob (June 3, 2013). "IATR 50" (photograph). RR Pictures Archives.net. Mason City, Iowa. Retrieved February 6, 2016. Archived February 6, 2016, at the Wayback Machine.
    (4) Terry, Jeff (January 29, 2014). "IATR 50" (photograph). RailPictures.Net. CP Interchange, Mason City, Iowa. Retrieved September 18, 2014. Iowa Traction 50 shoves four hoppers back to the CP interchange track near Clear Lake Junction. Archived September 18, 2014, at the Wayback Machine.
    (5) Schumann, John (December 6, 2015). "IATR 50" (photograph). RR Pictures Archives.net. Clear Lake, Iowa. Retrieved March 30, 2016. Archived March 30, 2016, at the Wayback Machine.
    (6) Smith, Nick (June 21, 2016). "IATR 50" (photograph). RailPictures.Net. IATR AGP Elevator Lead, Mason City, Iowa. Retrieved January 27, 2017. Iowa Traction RR IATR 50 is tied down at Mason City on the main outside the UP interlocking. IATR built for the Washington & Old Dominion in 1920 and spent time on the Cedar Rapids & Iowa City and the Kansas City Kaw Valley & Western RR before coming to Mason City. Archived January 27, 2017, at the Wayback Machine.
    (7) Guillaudeu and McCray, 2016, pp. 85, 90-93.
    (8) Ebright, Dick (June 24, 2017). "IATR 50" (photograph). RailPictures.Net. AGProcessing spur, Mason City, Iowa. Retrieved September 27, 2017. IATR #50, seen here on the spur to the AGP soybean facility, was built by Baldwin in 1920; 97 years old and still in revenue service. Archived September 27, 2017, at the Wayback Machine.
    (9) mtnclimberjoe (August 18, 2017). "IATR 50" (photograph). RailPictures.Net. AGP Facility, Mason City, Iowa. Retrieved December 23, 2017. The Iowa Traction railroad uses BLW steeple cab electric number 50 to shove a large cut of covered hoppers into the AGP corn processing facility in Mason City, Iowa. Archived December 23, 2017, at the Wayback Machine.
    (10) mtnclimberjoe (August 18, 2017). "IATR 50" (photograph). RailPictures.Net. Mason City, Iowa. Archived from the original on February 14, 2019. Retrieved February 14, 2018. The Iowa Traction has just finished switching out the Renewable Energy Group ethanol facility and heads east with a big cut of tank cars.
    (11) Leach, Paul (April 12, 2018). "IATR 50 (Steeple Cab)" (photograph). RR Picture Archives.net. Mason City, Iowa. Retrieved June 13, 2018. Preparing to move grain cars Archived June 14, 2018, at the Wayback Machine.
    (12) Junges, Olaf (August 29, 2018). "IATR 50". RR Picture Archives.net. Mason City, Iowa. Retrieved June 14, 2018. Heavy action day with 3 (!) Steeple Caps on duty. Archived February 14, 2019, at the Wayback Machine.
    (13) Williams, Craig (March 11, 2019). "IATR 50" (photograph). RailPictures.Net. Mason City, Iowa. Archived from the original on June 6, 2019. Retrieved June 6, 2019.
    (14) Leach, Paul (March 15, 2019). "IATR 50 (Steeple Cab)" (photograph). RR Picture Archives.net. Mason City, Iowa. Archived from the original on June 6, 2019. Retrieved June 6, 2019. Working at the interchange
    (15) POTB 101 (October 17, 2020). "Iowa Traction 50" (photograph). Mason City, Iowa: Railroadforums.com. Archived from the original on November 2, 2020. Retrieved November 2, 2020.
    (16) T. rex Roadtrip (October 22, 2020). Iowa Traction Autumn Day One. Retrieved October 8, 2021. (16:53 minutes) on YouTube. 2020 video showing IATR 50 in operation.
    (17) Leach, Paul (December 21, 2020). "IATR 50 (Steeple Cab)" (photograph). RR Picture Archives.net. Mason City, Iowa. Archived from the original on January 22, 2021. Retrieved January 22, 2021. Tied down for the day
  100. ^ Jaw Tooth (August 19, 2021). RARE Last Electric America Freight Railway, Swapping Cars W/ Union Pacific Railroad At Interchange!: Mason City. Retrieved October 8, 2021. (13:00 minutes) on YouTube. 2021 video showing IATR 50 in operation.

References

In Appendix K of Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority - Pre-filed Direct Testimony of Mr. Hafner, Mr. Mcray and Mr. Simmons, November 30, 2005 (Parts 4 and 5), Case No. PUE-2005-00018, Virginia State Corporation Commission. Obtained in "Case Docket Search". Virginia State Corporation Commission. Retrieved September 28, 2017. Archived September 28, 2017.

Further reading