Waupaca
City
Waupaca City Hall/Library Building
Waupaca City Hall/Library Building
Location of Waupaca in Waupaca County, Wisconsin.
Location of Waupaca in Waupaca County, Wisconsin.
Waupaca is located in Wisconsin
Waupaca
Waupaca
Location within the state of Wisconsin
Coordinates: 44°21′18″N 89°4′54″W / 44.35500°N 89.08167°W / 44.35500; -89.08167Coordinates: 44°21′18″N 89°4′54″W / 44.35500°N 89.08167°W / 44.35500; -89.08167
CountryUnited States
StateWisconsin
CountyWaupaca
Area
 • Total8.21 sq mi (21.27 km2)
 • Land7.92 sq mi (20.51 km2)
 • Water0.29 sq mi (0.75 km2)
Population
 • Total6,069
 • Estimate 
(2019)[3]
5,969
 • Density753.66/sq mi (291.01/km2)
Time zoneUTC-6 (Central (CST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
54981
Area code(s)715 & 534
FIPS code55-84375
Websitewww.cityofwaupaca.org
Looking north at Waupaca during sesquicentennial celebration on May 5, 2007
Looking north at Waupaca during sesquicentennial celebration on May 5, 2007
Looking south at downtown Waupaca in 1908
Looking south at downtown Waupaca in 1908

Waupaca is a city in and the county seat of Waupaca County in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. The population was 6,069 at the 2010 census.

The city is located mostly within the Town of Waupaca, and it is politically independent of the town. A portion extends west into the adjacent Town of Farmington, and there is also a noncontiguous area of the city in the Town of Lind to the south. The city is divided into natural areas, city areas, and industrial areas.

History

Native American mound builders lived in the area prior to European settlement. At one time there were 72 earthwork mounds in the area, some of them ancient prehistoric works.[4]

“Waupaca” is an Menominee word, Wāpahkoh, which means Place of Tomorrow Seen Clearly. For more than 10,000 years, the Menominee occupied about 10 million acres, including Waupaca and the Chain O’Lakes area. The Menominee in the Waupaca area moved between large villages on Taylor and Otter Lakes and camps along the falls on the Waupaca River.

In a series of seven treaties, the Menominee ceded their lands to the United States. The final treaty, in 1848, relinquished the last of the Menominee’s land, which included Waupaca.

The first white settlers, five men from Vermont, came to Waupaca looking for “the falls” in 1849. The settlers made camp near the end of what is now North Main Street with plans to harness the power of the falls and establish a community.

By 1852, a post office had been established and the settlement was officially named Waupaca. Waupaca was incorporated as a village on May 4, 1857 by an act of the Wisconsin State Legislature.[5] This act was repealed on April 7, 1862,[6] but revived on June 17 of the same year.[7] Waupaca was incorporated as a city by the legislature on March 5, 1875.[8]

Beginning in the 1960s and continuing to the present, the city has expanded its population and area through annexation.

Geography

Waupaca is located at 44°21′17″N 89°4′54″W / 44.35472°N 89.08167°W / 44.35472; -89.08167 (44.354922, -89.081775).[9]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 8.11 square miles (21.00 km2), of which, 7.82 square miles (20.25 km2) is land and 0.29 square miles (0.75 km2) is water.[10]

Transportation

US 10.svg
U.S. 10 Eastbound US 10 routes to Appleton. Westbound, US 10 routes to Stevens Point.
WIS 22.svg
WIS 22 travels north to Clintonville and south to Wild Rose.
WIS 49.svg
WIS 49 routes northbound to Iola. Southbound, it runs concurrent with US 10 and routes to Berlin.
WIS 54.svg
WIS 54 travels east to New London and west to Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin.

From 1899 to 1926, streetcar service was provided by the Waupaca Electric Light and Railway Company.

Airport

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18801,392
18902,12752.8%
19002,91236.9%
19102,789−4.2%
19202,8391.8%
19303,13110.3%
19403,45810.4%
19503,92113.4%
19603,9841.6%
19704,3429.0%
19804,4723.0%
19904,95710.8%
20005,67614.5%
20106,0696.9%
2019 (est.)5,969[3]−1.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[11]

2010 census

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 6,069 people, 2,702 households, and 1,356 families residing in the city. The population density was 776.1 inhabitants per square mile (299.7/km2). There were 2,996 housing units at an average density of 383.1 per square mile (147.9/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 96.6% White, 0.9% African American, 0.7% Native American, 0.3% Asian, 0.5% from other races, and 1.0% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.3% of the population.

There were 2,702 households, of which 25.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 34.9% were married couples living together, 10.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.4% had a male householder with no wife present, and 49.8% were non-families. 42.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 20.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.10 and the average family size was 2.92.

The median age in the city was 40.1 years. 22.1% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.4% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 24.7% were from 25 to 44; 24.6% were from 45 to 64; and 20.1% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 47.5% male and 52.5% female.

2000 census

At the 2000 census,[12] there were 5,676 people, 2,364 households and 1,302 families residing in the city. The population density was 947.0 per square mile (365.9/km2). There were 2,543 housing units at an average density of 424.3 per square mile (163.9/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 96.26% White, 0.33% Black or African American, 0.86% Native American, 0.25% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 1.39% from other races, and 0.88% from two or more races. 3.42% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 2,364 households, of which 29.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.5% were married couples living together, 10.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 44.9% were non-families. 38.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 18.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.25 and the average family size was 3.01.

Age distribution was 25.4% under the age of 18, 9.5% from 18 to 24, 27.0% from 25 to 44, 17.9% from 45 to 64, and 20.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 88.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.9 males.

The median household income was $31,095, and the median family income was $45,128. Males had a median income of $32,488 versus $21,651 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,890. About 7.1% of families and 10.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.9% of those under age 18 and 12.0% of those age 65 or over.

Business and industry

Waupaca, taken at 3:09:47 A.M. CDT on March 28, 2012 from an altitude of 211 nautical miles (391 km) during ISS Expedition 30.
Waupaca, taken at 3:09:47 A.M. CDT on March 28, 2012 from an altitude of 211 nautical miles (391 km) during ISS Expedition 30.

Waupaca Foundry is the largest employer in the city, employing over 1500 workers in three plants in or around the city. Most of the employees live within 20 miles (32 km) of the city.[13] Gusmer Enterprises, Inc., with a manufacturing plant on Ware Street, produces products for the food and beverage, industrial and pharmaceutical markets.[14]

Notable people

Sister cities

Waupaca has two sister cities:[15]

Images

See also

Waupaca Railroad Depot

References

  1. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  2. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-11-18.
  3. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  4. ^ "History of Waupaca". Waupaca Area Chamber of Commerce. Archived from the original on August 4, 2009. Retrieved 2010-01-08.
  5. ^ Private and Local Laws of the State of Wisconsin, 1857, chapter 264 http://sos.nmtvault.com/pdf/THEOSOS_025/images/00013923.pdf
  6. ^ Private and Local Laws of the State of Wisconsin, 1862, chapter 321 http://sos.nmtvault.com/pdf/THEOSOS_025/images/00013924.pdf
  7. ^ Id., chapter 365 http://sos.nmtvault.com/pdf/THEOSOS_025/images/00013924.pdf
  8. ^ An Act to incorporate the city of Waupaca
  9. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  10. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-25. Retrieved 2012-11-18.
  11. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  12. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  13. ^ "Archived copy". www.wisinfo.com. Archived from the original on 9 February 2013. Retrieved 3 February 2022.((cite web)): CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  14. ^ "City of Waupaca Economic Development". City of Waupaca. Retrieved 2012-08-05.
  15. ^ "City of Waupaca: Sister City". City of Waupaca, Wisconsin. Retrieved September 6, 2020.

Further reading