Welcome to Arrow Beach
Directed byLaurence Harvey
Written byLaurence Harvey
Jack Gross, Jr.
Based onstory by Wallace Bennett
Produced byLaurence Harvey
Jack Cushingham
StarringLaurence Harvey
Joanna Pettet
Meg Foster
Stuart Whitman
John Ireland
CinematographyGerald Perry Finnerman
Music byTony Camillo
Production
company
Brut Productions
Distributed byWarner Bros.
Release date
May 1974
Running time
85 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

Welcome to Arrow Beach is a 1974 American horror film directed by and starring Laurence Harvey.

Plot

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Robbin Stanley, a young hitchhiker, left stranded after a car crash and wandering on a California beach, is taken in by Jason Henry, a photographer and Korean War veteran, who lives in a nearby beach front house with his sister Grace. After Jason confides that Grace has some mental problems, Robbin soon begins to suspect that the opposite applies and that the mansion is home to some very strange goings-on.

Cast

Production

Filming began in February 1973. Harvey was very ill during the shoot from cancer. Harvey died in late 1973 before the film's release.[1] Lou Rawls sings the opening song "Who Can Tell Us Why".

Reception

The film took a year to be released. The Los Angeles Times called the film "a dreary, tedious tale".[2]

Harvey said the film was "vaguely reminiscent of Suddenly Last Summer... it could be labeled a contemporary parable about innocence in a very sick world".[3] He later called the film a thriller "which makes no comment on anything."[4]

References

  1. ^ Norma Lee Browning (6 Aug 1973). "Laurence Harvey as active as ever". Chicago Tribune. p. c11.
  2. ^ Thomas, Kevin. (Dec 17, 1976). "As the Worm Turns: 'Squirm'". Los Angeles Times. p. g21.
  3. ^ A. H. WEILER (Feb 4, 1973). "This Is 'Front Page' News: CARRY ON, CARRYCOT! AFTER "CABARET" SOME WELCOME! This Is Front Page' News". New York Times. p. 117.
  4. ^ Louise Sweeney Film critic of The (Oct 15, 1973). "Laurence Harvey: Boy Scout figures are gone". Christian Science Monitor. p. 9.