Wuert Engelmann
No. 33, 25
Position:Back
Personal information
Born:(1908-02-11)February 11, 1908
Miller, South Dakota, U.S.
Died:January 8, 1979(1979-01-08) (aged 70)
Green Bay, Wisconsin, U.S.
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:191 lb (87 kg)
Career information
High school:Miller (South Dakota)
College:South Dakota State
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Rushing attempts:58
Rushing yards:263
Total touchdowns:6
Player stats at PFR

Wuert Engelmann (also spelled Weert[1]) (February 11, 1908 – January 8, 1979) was an American professional football player who played back for four seasons for the Green Bay Packers. He played college football at South Dakota State University before playing professional football. After his career, he worked for 36 years for the Northern Paper Mill.

Early life and college

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Wuert Engelmann was born on February 11, 1908, in Miller, South Dakota, to Weert and Lena Engelmann.[2] The elder Engelmann was a retired farmer and breeder.[1] He attended Miller High School and then South Dakota State University.[3] At South Dakota State, he played varsity football for three years and was team captain for one of those years.[4] He also competed in track and field in college, taking part in three conference championships and barely falling short of qualifying for the United States Olympic decathlon team for the 1928 Summer Olympics.[5]

Professional career

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Engelmann played as a back for four seasons for the Green Bay Packers.[3] During his time with the Packers he teamed up with Johnny "Blood" McNally and was well-known for his speed.[6] He earned the nickname "The South Dakota Jackrabbit" because of his skills for eluding defenders and quickly getting around the edge of the offensive line.[4] Engelmann was released by Packers head coach Curly Lambeau near the end of 1933.[7] During his time with the Packers, Engelmann was part of two NFL Champion teams in 1930 and 1931, with the 1931 victory making the Packers the first team to win 3 straight championships.[8][9] Engelmann was inducted into the South Dakota Sports Hall of Fame in 1974.[5] In 1999, Sports Illustrated named Engelmann one of the 50 greatest sports figures from South Dakota.[10]

Personal life

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Engelmann married Geraldine Gillaume in 1933.[11] After his football career, he worked for Northern Paper Mill for 36 years. He was a member of the Packers Alumni Association, the local Elks Club and the Woodside Country Club. Engelmann was married and had two children. After a brief illness, he died on January 8, 1979.[2]

References

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  1. ^ a b "Father of Packers Halfback Ends Entertainment and Pleasure In Football, Fair". Green Bay Press-Gazette (clipping). October 26, 2023. p. 12. Archived from the original on August 2, 2023. Retrieved August 2, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  2. ^ a b "Weert Engelmann". Green Bay Press-Gazette (clipping). January 9, 1979. p. B-9. Archived from the original on August 2, 2023. Retrieved August 2, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ a b "Wuert Engelmann Stats". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Archived from the original on October 13, 2022. Retrieved August 2, 2023.
  4. ^ a b "Engelmann to Play Again on Packer Squad". Green Bay Press-Gazette (clipping). August 3, 1933. p. 9. Archived from the original on August 2, 2023. Retrieved August 2, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  5. ^ a b "Weert Engelmann - Inducted 1974". SDSHOF.com. Archived from the original on March 27, 2023. Retrieved August 7, 2023.
  6. ^ "Engelmann, Former Packer, Dies". Green Bay Press-Gazette (clipping). January 9, 1979. p. B-2. Archived from the original on August 2, 2023. Retrieved August 2, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ Calhoun, George Whitney (November 28, 1933). "Stapleton is Next Opponent of Green Bay". Green Bay Press-Gazette (clipping). p. 11. Archived from the original on August 2, 2023. Retrieved August 2, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ "Still Champs". Green Bay Press-Gazette (clipping). January 29, 2011. p. 3. Archived from the original on August 2, 2023. Retrieved August 2, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ "Contested Decision". Green Bay Press-Gazette (clipping). January 29, 2011. p. 3. Archived from the original on August 2, 2023. Retrieved August 2, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ "The 50 Greatest Sports Figures from South Dakota". Sports Illustrated. December 27, 1999. Archived from the original on June 26, 2022. Retrieved August 7, 2023.
  11. ^ "Do You Remember?". Green Bay Press-Gazette (clipping). August 11, 1934. p. 9. Archived from the original on August 2, 2023. Retrieved August 2, 2023 – via Newspapers.com.