Coin of Zeionises (c. 10 BCE – 10 CE).Obv: King on horseback holding whip, with bow behind. Corrupted Greek legend MANNOLOU UIOU SATRAPY ZEIONISOU "Satrap Zeionises, son of Manigul". Buddhist Triratna symbol.Rev: King on the left, receiving a crown from a city goddess holding a cornucopia. Kharoshthi legend MANIGULASA CHATRAPASA PUTRASA CHATRAPASA JIHUNIASA "Satrap Zeionises, son of Satrap Manigul". South Chach mint.
Coin of Zeionises (c. 10 BCE – 10 CE).
Obv: King on horseback holding whip, with bow behind. Corrupted Greek legend MANNOLOU UIOU SATRAPY ZEIONISOU "Satrap Zeionises, son of Manigul". Buddhist Triratna symbol.
Rev: King on the left, receiving a crown from a city goddess holding a cornucopia. Kharoshthi legend MANIGULASA CHATRAPASA PUTRASA CHATRAPASA JIHUNIASA "Satrap Zeionises, son of Satrap Manigul". South Chach mint.

Zeionises (Greek: Ζειονίσης Zeionísēs, ΖΕΙΟΝΙϹΟΥ Zeionisou (epigraphic); Kharosthi: 𐨗𐨁𐨱𐨂𐨣𐨁𐨀 Ji-hu-ni-a, Jihunia,[1] 𐨗𐨁𐨱𐨆𐨞𐨁𐨐 Ji-ho-ṇi-ka, Jihoṇika;[2] from Saka *Jihonyaka, meaning "benefactor".[3]) was an Indo-Scythian satrap of the area of southern Chach (Kashmir) for king Azes II.

He then became king, and ruled in parts of the Indian subcontinent around 10 BCE – 10 CE, but apparently lost his territory to the invasion of the Indo-Parthians.

His coins bear the Buddhist Triratna symbol on the obverse, and adopt representations of Greek divinities such as the city goddess Tyche.

A silver jug found at Taxila (Konow 1929: 81-83) indicates that Zeionises was "satrap of Chuksa, son of Manigula, brother of the great king", but who this king was remains uncertain.

Indo-Scythian Zeionises. Circa 45-35 to 5 BCE. Uncertain mint in Chukhsa (Chach)
Indo-Scythian Zeionises. Circa 45-35 to 5 BCE. Uncertain mint in Chukhsa (Chach)

See also

References

  1. ^ Gardner, Percy, The Coins of the Greek and Scythic Kings of Bactria and India in the British Museum, p. 110-111
  2. ^ Konow, Sten, Kharoshṭhī Inscriptions with the Exception of Those of Aśoka, Corpus Inscriptionum Indicarum, Vol. II, Part I. Calcutta: Government of India Central Publication Branch, p. 82
  3. ^ Harmatta, Janos 1999, Languages and scripts in Graeco-Bactria and the Saka kingdoms in Harmatta, J, BNPuri and GF Etemadi (eds), History of civilizations of Central Asia,volume II, The development of sedentary and nomadic civilizations: 700 BC to AD 250, Motilal Banarsidas, Delhi, p. 400.
Preceded by
Azes II
Indo-Scythian Ruler
(c. 10 BCE – 10 CE)
Succeeded by
Indo-Scythian satrap
Kharahostes

Kushan King:
Heraios