Zhang Xiaoming
张晓明
Zhang Xiaoming
Deputy Director of the Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office
Assumed office
13 February 2020
DirectorXia Baolong
Director of the Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office
In office
23 September 2017 – 13 February 2020[1]
PremierLi Keqiang
LeaderZhang DejiangHan Zheng
Preceded byWang Guangya
Succeeded byXia Baolong
Director of the Liaison Office of the Central People's Government in Hong Kong
In office
18 December 2012 – 22 September 2017
PremierWen Jiabao
Li Keqiang
LeaderZhang Dejiang
Preceded byPeng Qinghua
Succeeded byWang Zhimin
Personal details
Born (1963-09-03) 3 September 1963 (age 57)
Taizhou, Jiangsu, China
Political partyCommunist Party of China
Alma materSouthwest University of Political Science & Law
Renmin University of China
Chinese name
Traditional Chinese
Simplified Chinese

Zhang Xiaoming (Chinese: 张晓明; born 3 September 1963) is a Chinese politician and former director of the Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office. He rose to that post from directorship of the Liaison Office of the Central People's Government in Hong Kong and left it by way of demotion to deputy director in 2020.

Early life

Zhang was born in Taizhou, Jiangsu in September 1963. He graduated from Southwest University of Political Science & Law and Renmin University of China in 1984, where he majored in law. He studied under Gao Mingxuan (高铭暄), who is a famous jurist in China. Zhang received an LLM from Renmin University of China in 1986.[2]

Party politician

In 1986, Zhang was assigned to Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office as a secretary for Liao Hui. On 18 December 2012, Zhang started serving as director of the Liaison Office of the Central People's Government in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region and spearheaded the CCP's efforts against the democratic movement in the former British colony. In a widely reported incident he stated to pro-democratic legislative council member Leung Yiu-chung that "the fact that you are allowed to stay alive already shows the country's inclusiveness".[3]

In September 2015, Zhang stirred controversy in Hong Kong after claiming that the Chief Executive of Hong Kong had a "special legal position which overrides administrative, legislative and judicial organs" and that separation of powers is "not suitable for Hong Kong".[4] Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying subsequently affirmed that his position is "transcendent" of the branches of the state.[4]

He continued as director of the Liaison Office till 2017, when he was promoted to director of the Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office. He was demoted, in February 2020, during the widespread anti-government protests and the COVID-19 pandemic affecting Hong Kong, to a deputy directorship of that office.[1] Zhang is an alternate member of the 18th Central Committee of the Communist Party of China.[5]

In November 2020, following the expulsion of 4 pro-democracy lawmakers from the Legislative Council, Zhang said "Hong Kong’s administrators must be patriots... and people who are anti-China and cause trouble in Hong Kong must be kicked out. This is a political rule under 'one country, two systems', and has become a legal requirement now."[6]

Also in November 2020, Zhang called for judicial reformation in Hong Kong.[7] In January 2021, Chief Justice Geoffrey Ma responded and said that the judiciary should not be reformed simply due to the pro-Beijing party being unhappy with the court's rulings.[7]

US sanctions

In August 2020, Zhang and ten other officials were sanctioned by the United States Department of the Treasury under Executive Order 13936 by President Trump for undermining Hong Kong's autonomy.[8][9][10]

On October 14, 2020, the United States Department of State released a report on 10 individuals who materially contributed to the failure of the China to meet its obligations under the Sino–British Joint Declaration and Hong Kong's Basic Law. Zhang was on the list. [11]

References

  1. ^ a b "China replaces head of its Hong Kong and Macau affairs office". Reuters. Retrieved 12 February 2020.
  2. ^ "黃京平". ruc.edu.cn (in Chinese). Retrieved 17 March 2013.
  3. ^ China asserts paternal rights over Hong Kong in democracy clash, James Pomfret, Reuters, 11 September 2014.
  4. ^ a b Cheng, Kris (21 September 2015). "Failure to de-colonise 'caused many problems' for Hong Kong, says former Beijing official". Hong Kong Free Press.
  5. ^ "彭王任中委張曉明晉候補委員". Sing Tao Daily (in Chinese). 14 November 2012. Retrieved 17 March 2013.
  6. ^ "Top Beijing official moves to set record straight over Hong Kong autonomy". South China Morning Post. 17 November 2020. Retrieved 17 November 2020.
  7. ^ a b "Give us details of reforms required, Hong Kong chief justice tells critics". South China Morning Post. 5 January 2021. Retrieved 5 January 2021.
  8. ^ "US sanctions Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam, police chief and 9 other top officials for 'undermining autonomy'". Hong Kong Free Press HKFP. 7 August 2020. Retrieved 7 August 2020.
  9. ^ Macias, Amanda (7 August 2020). "U.S. sanctions Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam for carrying out Chinese 'policies of suppression'". CNBC. Retrieved 7 August 2020.
  10. ^ "Treasury Sanctions Individuals for Undermining Hong Kong's Autonomy". United States Department of the Treasury. 7 August 2020. Retrieved 7 August 2020.
  11. ^ U.S. Department of State. "Identification of Foreign Persons Involved in the Erosion of the Obligations of China Under the Joint Declaration or the Basic Law". Archived from the original on 14 October 2020. Retrieved 14 October 2020.
Government offices
Preceded by
Peng Qinghua
Director of Liaison Office of the Central People's Government in Hong Kong
2012-2017
Succeeded by
Wang Zhimin
Preceded by
Wang Guangya
Director of Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office
2017-2020
Succeeded by
Xia Baolong