Cambridge, Wisconsin
Downtown Cambridge looking west on Highway 12
Location of Cambridge in Jefferson County, Wisconsin.
Coordinates: 43°0′15″N 89°1′2″W / 43.00417°N 89.01722°W / 43.00417; -89.01722Coordinates: 43°0′15″N 89°1′2″W / 43.00417°N 89.01722°W / 43.00417; -89.01722
Country United States
State Wisconsin
CountiesDane, Jefferson
Government
 • TypeVillage Board of Trustees
 • PresidentMark McNally
Area
 • Total1.48 sq mi (3.83 km2)
 • Land1.47 sq mi (3.81 km2)
 • Water0.01 sq mi (0.02 km2)
Elevation850 ft (259 m)
Population
 • Total1,457
 • Estimate 
(2019)[4]
1,535
 • Density1,042.80/sq mi (402.54/km2)
Time zoneUTC-6 (Central (CST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-5 (CDT)
Area code(s)608
FIPS code55-12225[5]
GNIS feature ID1562561[2]
Websitewww.ci.cambridge.wi.us
Looking east while entering Cambridge on Highway 12/18
Looking east while entering Cambridge on Highway 12/18

Cambridge is a village in Dane (mostly) and Jefferson counties in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. The population was 1,457 at the 2010 census.[6] Of this, 1,348 were in Dane County, and 109 were in Jefferson County.

The Dane County portion of Cambridge is part of the Madison Metropolitan Statistical Area, while the Jefferson County portion is part of the WatertownFort Atkinson Micropolitan Statistical Area.

History

Settlement–1890

The settlement of Cambridge dates back to October 15, 1847, when the farmer Joseph Keyes filed plans with the Register of Deeds of Dane County. The first structure in the area was a dam on the northern part of Koshkonong Creek. By the late 1880s, Cambridge had grown into a community of about 700 people with shops, hotels, and a post office. Future inventor Ole Evinrude lived there. In 1890 a devastating fire broke out, destroying most of the businesses and parts of Main Street.[7]

Oldest Scandinavian Methodist Church
Oldest Scandinavian Methodist Church
Lake Ripley in Cambridge, WI
Lake Ripley in Cambridge, WI

1900s–2000s

The town was rebuilt by 1910, following the fire, and the invention of the automobile ignited tourism. Nearby Lake Ripley became a destination for many Chicago travelers.

Rowe Pottery, a staple of downtown Cambridge, Wisconsin
Rowe Pottery, a staple of downtown Cambridge, Wisconsin

During the 1980s and 1990s, Cambridge was touted as the "salt glaze pottery capital of the world" because of the potteries located there.[8]

2000s–present

After Cambridge lost much of its pottery draw,[clarification needed] the village began to draw mountain bikers from southeastern Wisconsin. CamRock County Park offers trails for hiking and cross-country skiing, and a 16-mile mountain bike track.[9]

Geography

Cambridge is located at 43°0′15″N 89°1′2″W / 43.00417°N 89.01722°W / 43.00417; -89.01722 (43.004089, -89.017201).[10]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 1.44 square miles (3.73 km2), of which 1.43 square miles (3.70 km2) is land and 0.01 square miles (0.03 km2) is water.[11] Koshkonong Creek runs through the center of the village, flowing south to Lake Koshkonong.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880303
189045249.2%
1910507
1920490−3.4%
19305002.0%
194057715.4%
1950552−4.3%
19606059.6%
197068913.9%
198084422.5%
199096314.1%
20001,10114.3%
20101,45732.3%
2019 (est.)1,535[4]5.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[12]

2010 census

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 1,457 people, 615 households, and 397 families living in the village. The population density was 1,018.9 inhabitants per square mile (393.4/km2). There were 654 housing units at an average density of 457.3 per square mile (176.6/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 96.8% White, 0.9% African American, 0.3% Native American, 0.5% Asian, 0.5% from other races, and 1.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.7% of the population.

There were 615 households, of which 32.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.4% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 35.4% were non-families. 28.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 14.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.37 and the average family size was 2.93.

The median age in the village was 41.3 years. 24.4% of residents were under the age of 18; 6.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 25.1% were from 25 to 44; 30.2% were from 45 to 64; and 14.1% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 48.2% male and 51.8% female.

2000 census

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 1,101 people, 470 households, and 303 families living in the village. The population density was 1,238.5 people per square mile (477.6/km2). There were 483 housing units at an average density of 543.3 per square mile (209.5/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 98.55% White, 0.09% African American, 0.18% Native American, 0.27% Asian, 0.45% from other races, and 0.45% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.00% of the population.

There were 470 households, out of which 32.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.8% were married couples living together, 7.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.5% were non-families. 29.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 17.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.89.

In the village, the population was spread out, with 24.3% under the age of 18, 5.5% from 18 to 24, 29.5% from 25 to 44, 21.1% from 45 to 64, and 19.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 91.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.1 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $52,039, and the median income for a family was $57,895. Males had a median income of $37,986 versus $29,018 for females. The per capita income for the village was $22,599. About 0.6% of families and 4.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.4% of those under age 18 and 7.1% of those age 65 or over.

Media

Cambridge is home to a weekly newspaper, The Cambridge News and Deerfield Independent, covering as its name suggests both communities.

Notable people

Images

References

  1. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  3. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-11-18.
  4. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  5. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  6. ^ "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (DP-1): Cambridge village, Wisconsin". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 5, 2012.
  7. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-07-21. Retrieved 2013-08-08.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  8. ^ "Our history". Village of Cambridge. Retrieved April 18, 2018.
  9. ^ "CamRock County Park". Dane County Land & Water Resources Department. Retrieved April 18, 2018.
  10. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  11. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-07-02. Retrieved 2012-11-18.
  12. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  13. ^ "Allen, Carolyn Blanchard 1921". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved November 26, 2019.
  14. ^ "Cambridge: From Farms to Tourism". Wisconsin State Journal. April 19, 1993. p. 24. Retrieved November 26, 2019 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  15. ^ "Inventor of Outboard Motor, Ole Evinrude, Dies Suddenly". The Journal Times. July 13, 1934. p. 7. Retrieved November 26, 2019 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  16. ^ "Halfway Home". The La Crosse Tribune. July 4, 2003. p. 11. Retrieved November 26, 2019 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  17. ^ "Legreid, Blacksmith, Dies in Cambridge". Wisconsin State Journal. April 18, 1944. p. 7. Retrieved November 26, 2019 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  18. ^ "Ex-Assemblyman Porter Dies". Wisconsin State Journal. January 7, 1941. p. 7. Retrieved November 27, 2019 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  19. ^ "Schuler's Team Surviving without Big Budget". The Capital Times. June 28, 2003. p. 19. Retrieved November 27, 2019 – via Newspapers.com. open access