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Cape of Good Hope (left) and Cape Hangklip (right) in South Africa, from space
Cape Tisan in Mersin Province, Turkey
Cape Tindari and Marinello lagoons, Sicily

In geography, a cape is a headland, peninsula or promontory extending into a body of water, usually a sea.[1] A cape usually represents a marked change in trend of the coastline, often making them important landmarks in sea navigation. This also makes them prone to natural forms of erosion, mainly tidal actions, resulting in a relatively short geological lifespan. Capes can be formed by glaciers, volcanoes, and changes in sea level. Erosion plays a large role in each of these methods of formation.[citation needed]

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References

  1. ^ Whittow, John (1984). Dictionary of Physical Geography. London: Penguin, 1984, p. 80. ISBN 0-14-051094-X.