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Gloucester light dory

The Gloucester dory is a variant of the Banks dory, a type of narrow-bottomed, slab-sided boat, common in the North Eastern United States. It is characteristically smaller and lighter, with less overhang, both bow and stern, and less freeboard.[1] It retains the Banks dory's slab sides. Gloucester dories were designed to be launched through the surf behind a breakwater for daily fishing and lobstering off the Massachusetts shore.

Because of its simple lines, a Gloucester dory is relatively easy to build. With the straight sides and flat bottom, stitch and glue techniques work well with this boat.[2]

See also

References

  1. ^ Jackson, Tom (21 October 2020). "The Gloucester Light Dory". Retrieved 20 January 2021.
  2. ^ "Old Wharf Dory, Row Boats". Retrieved 20 January 2021.

Books;