Kerry-Lynne D. Findlay
Kerry-Lynne Findlay - 2017 (37989872485) (cropped).jpg
Findlay in 2017
Minister of National Revenue
In office
July 15, 2013 – November 4, 2015
Prime MinisterStephen Harper
Preceded byGail Shea
Succeeded byDiane Lebouthillier
Associate Minister of National Defence
In office
February 22, 2013 – July 15, 2013
Prime MinisterStephen Harper
Preceded byBernard Valcourt
Succeeded byJulian Fantino
Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice
In office
May 25, 2011 – February 21, 2013
MinisterRob Nicholson
Member of Parliament
for South Surrey—White Rock
Assumed office
October 21, 2019
Preceded byGordie Hogg
Member of Parliament
for Delta—Richmond East
In office
May 30, 2011 – August 4, 2015
Preceded byJohn Cummins
Succeeded byConstituency abolished
Personal details
Born (1955-01-12) January 12, 1955 (age 67)for
Ladysmith, British Columbia, Canada
Political partyConservative
Spouse(s)Brent Chapman
Residence(s)Surrey, British Columbia, Canada
ProfessionLawyer/Politician

Kerry-Lynne D. Findlay PC QC (born 12 January 1955) is a Canadian politician, who was elected as the MP for South Surrey—White Rock in the 2019 federal election. She previously sat in the House of Commons of Canada from the 2011 election until 2015.[1] She represented the electoral district of Delta—Richmond East as a member of the Conservative Party. She was appointed and sworn in as Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice on June 1, 2011, and as Associate Minister of National Defence on February 22, 2013.[2] She served as the Minister of National Revenue from July 15, 2013, until November 4, 2015.[3]

Education

Findlay graduated from the University of British Columbia in 1975 with a Bachelor of Arts in history and political science.[citation needed] She then graduated from the same university in 1978 with a law degree.

Legal career

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During her legal career, Findlay has been active in both the national and B.C. provincial branch of the Canadian Bar Association holding various positions in that organization including national and provincial chair of the Constitutional Law Section, member of the National Task Force on Court Reform in Canada, and elected president of the B.C. Branch for the 1997–1998 term[citation needed]. Findlay was appointed a Queen's Counsel in March 1999 by the Attorney-General of B.C. and served a five-year term as a Member of the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal by appointment of the Federal Minister of Justice (2006–2011). She has also been recognized with the Vancouver YWCA Woman of Distinction Award in the category of Management, Professions and Trades (May 2001) and the national Cecilia I. Johnstone Award (2011) that recognizes women who have achieved professional excellence in their field and influenced other women to pursue legal careers, supported other women in career advancement or opened doors for women lawyers in a variety of job settings that historically were closed to them[citation needed].

Political career

Party leader Andrew Scheer campaigning with Findlay in December 2017
Party leader Andrew Scheer campaigning with Findlay in December 2017

Findlay sat on a selection panel to help choose a replacement for Marie Deschamps of Quebec, who retired from the bench.[4]

She was defeated by Liberal candidate Carla Qualtrough in the 2015 election.

In 2017, Findlay announced her candidacy as the Conservative Party of Canada candidate in the South Surrey—White Rock by-election.[5] Findlay was defeated by Gordie Hogg, taking 42.1% of the vote to Hogg's 47.5%.[6] In 2019, Findlay ran again for Member of Parliament of South Surrey—White Rock as the Conservative Party candidate. Findlay won in the riding at that year's federal election with 42.6% of the vote, unseating Gordie Hogg who entered Parliament through a by-election.[7]

Findlay voted in support of Bill C-233 - an act to amend the Criminal Code (sex-selective abortion), which would make it an indictable or a summary offence for a medical practitioner to knowingly perform an abortion solely on the grounds of the child's genetic sex.[8][non-primary source needed]

In August 2020, she received backlash after she retweeted another user's Twitter post trying to connect Chrystia Freeland with George Soros. She deleted the tweet and apologized shortly after.[9]

Community

Findlay's volunteer posts, in addition to the Canadian Bar Association, have included chair of the Vancouver City Planning Commission, board member of Science World, executive member of the Junior Leagues of Canada, president of Delta Zeta chapter of Alpha Gamma Delta International Fraternity, and honorary counsel for the Chinese Benevolent Association of Canada.[citation needed] In 2016, she was named a Distinguished Citizen by Alpha Gamma Delta.[10]

Family

Findlay is married to actor Brent Chapman and has four children and four grandchildren.[11]

Electoral record

2021 Canadian federal election: South Surrey—White Rock
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Kerry-Lynne Findlay 24,158 42.5 -0.6
Liberal Gordie Hogg 22,166 39.0 +2.9
New Democratic June Liu 8,395 14.8 +2.5
People's Gary Jensen 2,186 3.8 +2.3
Total valid votes 56,905
Total rejected ballots 340 0.4 +4.3
Turnout 57,245 64.7 -6.7
Eligible voters 88,048
Conservative hold Swing -0.6
Source: Elections Canada[12][13]
2019 Canadian federal election: South Surrey—White Rock
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Kerry-Lynne Findlay 24,310 41.9 -0.24 $109,768.11
Liberal Gordie Hogg 21,692 37.4 -10.09 none listed
New Democratic Stephen Crozier 6,716 11.6 +6.72 none listed
Green Beverly Pixie Hobby 4,458 7.7 +3.58 none listed
People's Joel Poulin 852 1.5 $5,942.36
Total valid votes/expense limit 58,028 100.0
Total rejected ballots 326
Turnout 58,354 69.4
Eligible voters 84,138
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +3.3
Source: Elections Canada[14][15]


Canadian federal by-election, 2017: South Surrey—White Rock
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Gordie Hogg 14,369 47.49 +6.00
Conservative Kerry-Lynne Findlay 12,752 42.14 -1.89
New Democratic Jonathan Silveira 1,478 4.88 -5.53
Green Larry Colero 1,247 4.12 +0.70
Christian Heritage Rod Taylor 238 0.79
Libertarian Donald Wilson 89 0.29 -0.17
Progressive Canadian Michael Huenefeld 86 0.28 +0.09
Total valid votes/Expense limit 30,259 100.00
Total rejected ballots
Turnout 30,259 38.13 -36.60
Eligible voters 79,359
Liberal hold Swing +3.95
2015 Canadian federal election: Delta
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Liberal Carla Qualtrough 27,355 49.12 +30.55 $72,634.16
Conservative Kerry-Lynne Findlay 18,255 32.78 -15.17 $174,408.46
New Democratic Jeremy Leveque 8,311 14.92 -13.13 $59,352.24
Green Anthony Edward Devellano 1,768 3.17 -1.57
Total valid votes/expense limit 55,689 100.00   $206,935.20
Total rejected ballots 200 0.36
Turnout 55,889 74.47
Eligible voters 75,044
Liberal notional gain from Conservative Swing +22.86
Source: Elections Canada[16][17][18]
2011 Canadian federal election: Delta—Richmond East
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Kerry-Lynne Findlay 26,059 54.24 -1.51
New Democratic Nic Slater 11,181 23.27 +8.82
Liberal Alan Beesley 8,112 16.88 -5.14
Green Duane Laird 2,324 4.84 -2.94
Independent John Shavluk 220 0.46
Libertarian Jeff Monds 147 0.31
Total valid votes/Expense limit 48,043 100.00
Total rejected ballots 168 0.35 -0.03
Turnout 48,211 60.39 +0.39
Eligible voters 79,831
2000 Canadian federal election: Vancouver Quadra
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Liberal Stephen Owen 22,253 44.83 +2.69 $60,542
Alliance Kerry-Lynne Findlay 18,613 37.50 +9.91 $64,240
Progressive Conservative Bill Clarke 4,112 8.28 -8.59 $12,355
New Democratic Loretta Woodcock 2,595 5.22 -4.81 $10,844
Green Doug Warkentin 1,434 2.88 +0.30 $16,556
Canadian Action Chris Shaw 390 0.78 $5,683
Natural Law Steven Beck 126 0.25 -0.22
Marxist–Leninist Anne Jamieson 109 0.21 -0.09 $18
Total valid votes 49,632 100.0  
Total rejected ballots 194 0.40
Turnout 49,826 63.34 -4.32
Liberal hold Swing -3.61
Change for the Canadian Alliance is based on the Reform Party.

References

  1. ^ Election 2011: Delta—Richmond East Archived September 4, 2011, at the Wayback Machine. The Globe and Mail, May 2, 2011.
  2. ^ "PM Harper shuffles cabinet to fill aboriginal affairs gap". CBC News. February 22, 2013. Archived from the original on March 19, 2014. Retrieved March 13, 2014.
  3. ^ "Delta-Richmond East MP lands backbench role in Harper cabinet re-shuffle". Richmond News. July 15, 2013. Archived from the original on March 13, 2014. Retrieved March 13, 2014.
  4. ^ "MPs named to help choose new Supreme Court justice". CTV News. August 8, 2012. Archived from the original on August 13, 2012. Retrieved September 5, 2012.
  5. ^ "Conservatives choose Findlay for South Surrey-White Rock run". Peace Arch News. November 13, 2017. Archived from the original on November 16, 2017. Retrieved November 20, 2017.
  6. ^ "Liberals win 3 of 4 federal byelections, nab seat from Tories in B.C." CBC News. 12 December 2017. Archived from the original on 12 December 2017. Retrieved 12 December 2017.
  7. ^ "Federal election 2019 live results". Archived from the original on October 22, 2019. Retrieved October 22, 2019.
  8. ^ House of Commons (June 2, 2021). "2nd reading of Bill C-233, An Act to amend the Criminal Code (sex-selective abortion)". LEGISinfo. Retrieved June 28, 2022.((cite web)): CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  9. ^ Breen, Kerri (August 29, 2020). "B.C. Tory MP deletes tweet on 'closeness' of George Soros, Chrystia Freeland". Global News. Corus Entertainment. Archived from the original on August 29, 2020. Retrieved August 30, 2020.
  10. ^ "2016 Convention Distinguished Citizen - Kerry-Lynne Findlay". Vimeo. August 24, 2016. Archived from the original on July 25, 2020. Retrieved May 22, 2018.
  11. ^ "Hon. Kerry-Lynne D. Findlay". Archived from the original on January 25, 2021. Retrieved September 1, 2021.
  12. ^ "List of confirmed candidates – September 20, 2021 Federal Election". Elections Canada. Retrieved 2 September 2021.
  13. ^ Canada, Elections. "Election Night Results - Electoral Districts". enr.elections.ca. Retrieved 29 September 2021.
  14. ^ "List of confirmed candidates". Elections Canada. Retrieved October 4, 2019.
  15. ^ "Election Night Results". Elections Canada. Retrieved November 16, 2019.
  16. ^ Elections Canada – Confirmed candidates for Delta, 30 September 2015
  17. ^ Official Voting Results - Delta
  18. ^ "Elections Canada – Preliminary Election Expenses Limits for Candidates". Archived from the original on August 15, 2015.