Kommersant
Kommersant.png
Front page on 27 December 2010
TypeDaily newspaper
Owner(s)Alisher Usmanov
Founded1989; 33 years ago (1989)
LanguageRussian
HeadquartersMoscow
Circulation120,000–130,000 (July 2013)
Websitewww.kommersant.ru

Kommersant (Russian: Коммерсантъ, IPA: [kəmʲɪrˈsant], The Businessman or Commerce Man, often shortened to Ъ) is a nationally distributed daily newspaper published in Russia mostly devoted to politics and business. The TNS Media and NRS Russia certified July 2013 circulation of the daily was 120,000–130,000.[1] It is owned by Alisher Usmanov.[2]

History

In 1989, with the onset of press freedom in Russia, Kommersant was founded under the ownership of businessman and publicist Vladimir Yakovlev.[3][4] The first issue was released in January 1990.[5] It was modeled after Western business journalism.[4]

The newspaper's title is spelled in Russian with a terminal hard sign (ъ) – a letter that is silent at the end of a word in modern Russian, and was thus largely abolished by the post-revolution Russian spelling reform, in reference to a pre-Soviet newspaper of the same name active between 1909 and 1917.[5] This is played up in the Kommersant logo, which features a script hard sign at the end of somewhat more formal font. The newspaper also refers to itself or its redaction as "Ъ".

Founded as a weekly newspaper, it became popular among business and political elites.[5] It then became a daily newspaper in 1992.[5][6] It was owned by the businessman Boris Berezovsky from 1999 until 2006, when he sold it to Badri Patarkatsishvili.[4][6] In September 2006, it was sold to Alisher Usmanov.[6]

In January 2005, Kommersant published a protest at a court ruling ordering it to publish a denial of a story about a crisis at Alfa-Bank.[7]

In 2008, BBC News said Kommersant was one of Russia's leading liberal business broadsheets.[8]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Kommersant Website; (Russian)". 2013. Retrieved 1 September 2015.
  2. ^ Poberezhskaya, Marianna (1 January 2015). "Media coverage of climate change in Russia: Governmental bias and climate silence". Public Understanding of Science. 24 (1): 96–111. doi:10.1177/0963662513517848. ISSN 0963-6625.
  3. ^ "Kommersant; Presseurop (English)". Presseurop. 2012. Retrieved 13 April 2012.
  4. ^ a b c "Media Map". Index on Censorship. 37 (1): 183–189. 1 February 2008. doi:10.1080/03064220701882780. ISSN 0306-4220.
  5. ^ a b c d Arrese, Ángel (1 March 2017). "The role of economic journalism in political transitions". Journalism. 18 (3): 368–383. doi:10.1177/1464884915623172. ISSN 1464-8849.
  6. ^ a b c Koikkalainen, Katja (1 December 2007). "The local and the International in Russian business journalism: Structures and practices". Europe-Asia Studies. 59 (8): 1315–1329. doi:10.1080/09668130701655176. ISSN 0966-8136.
  7. ^ "Alfa-d Up". Kommersant. Moscow. 31 January 2005. Archived from the original on 6 June 2011. Retrieved 28 August 2009.
  8. ^ "The press in Russia". BBC News. 16 May 2008. Retrieved 29 November 2014.