This article may be expanded with text translated from the corresponding article in Spanish. (January 2011) Click [show] for important translation instructions. View a machine-translated version of the Spanish article. Machine translation like DeepL or Google Translate is a useful starting point for translations, but translators must revise errors as necessary and confirm that the translation is accurate, rather than simply copy-pasting machine-translated text into the English Wikipedia. Consider adding a topic to this template: there are already 4,746 articles in the main category, and specifying|topic= will aid in categorization. Do not translate text that appears unreliable or low-quality. If possible, verify the text with references provided in the foreign-language article. You must provide copyright attribution in the edit summary accompanying your translation by providing an interlanguage link to the source of your translation. A model attribution edit summary is Content in this edit is translated from the existing Spanish Wikipedia article at [[:es:Manuel Arellano]]; see its history for attribution. You should also add the template ((Translated|es|Manuel Arellano)) to the talk page. For more guidance, see Wikipedia:Translation.
Manuel Arellano
Born (1957-06-19) 19 June 1957 (age 64)
NationalitySpanish
Alma materLondon School of Economics
University of Barcelona
Known forArellano–Bond estimator
Spouse(s)Olympia Bover
Scientific career
FieldsEconometrics
InstitutionsCEMFI
Doctoral advisorDenis Sargan[1]

Manuel Arellano (born 19 June 1957) is a Spanish economist specialising in econometrics and empirical microeconomics. Together with Stephen Bond, he developed the Arellano–Bond estimator, a widely used GMM estimator for panel data. This estimator is based on the earlier article by Arellano's PhD supervisor, John Denis Sargan, and Alok Bhargava (Bhargava and Sargan, 1983). RePEc lists the paper about the Arellano-Bond estimator as the most cited article in economics.[2]

Biography

Manuel Arellano earned his undergraduate degree at Universidad de Barcelona in 1979. Later in 1982, he began graduate studies in Econometrics and Mathematical Economics at London School of Economics and completed a Ph.D. in economics in 1985.

After his graduation, he was employed as a research lecturer at University of Oxford from 1985 to 1989 and had a research fellow at Nuffield College, Oxford from 1986 to 1989. From 1989 to 1992, he was a lecturer in economics at London School of Economics. From 1991 until now, he is a professor of Econometrics at CEMFI, Madrid.[1]

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Further reading