Mount Whymper
Highest point
Elevation2,844 m (9,331 ft)[1]
Prominence263 m (863 ft)[1]
Coordinates51°13′28″N 116°05′55″W / 51.22444°N 116.09861°W / 51.22444; -116.09861Coordinates: 51°13′28″N 116°05′55″W / 51.22444°N 116.09861°W / 51.22444; -116.09861[1]
Geography
Mount Whymper
Mount Whymper
Kootenay National Park, British Columbia, Canada
Parent rangeCanadian Rockies
Topo mapNTS 82N1 Mount Goodsir
Climbing
First ascent1901 by Edward Whymper Joseph Bossoney, Christian Kaufmann, Christian Klucker, and Joseph Pollinger
Mt. Whymper seen from Highway 93
Mt. Whymper seen from Highway 93

Mount Whymper, 2,844 m, is a mountain located in the Canadian Rockies, British Columbia, Canada, in the Vermilion Pass area in Kootenay National Park.

The mountain is named for its first conqueror, the English alpinist, explorer, writer and engraver Edward Whymper.

In 1901, Whymper and his four guides (Joseph Bossoney, Christian Kaufmann, Christian Klucker, and Joseph Pollinger)[2][3] first climbed Mount Whymper.[1][3][4][5] It was renamed to honour him. It had been named "Mount Lefroy".[1] Whymper was exploring the area sponsored by Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR)[2][6] to promote the Canadian Rocky Mountains and the railway in his conferences.[7][8]

There is another Mount Whymper, (1539 m – 48°57′04″N 124°09′43″W / 48.95111°N 124.16194°W / 48.95111; -124.16194) in British Columbia, on Vancouver Island, named for Edward's brother Frederick Whymper.[9][10][11]

Geology

Mount Whymper is composed of sedimentary rock laid down during the Precambrian to Jurassic periods.[12] Formed in shallow seas, this sedimentary rock was pushed east and over the top of younger rock during the Laramide orogeny.[13]

Climate

Based on the Köppen climate classification, Mount Whymper is located in a subarctic climate zone with cold, snowy winters, and mild summers.[14] Temperatures can drop below −20°C with wind chill factors below −30°C.

References

  1. ^ a b c d e "Mount Whymper British Columbia #1562". Bivouac.com. Retrieved 2 June 2012.
  2. ^ a b "Edward Whymper". PeakFinder.com. Retrieved 14 September 2019.
  3. ^ a b "Mount Whymper". Peakware.com. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 2 June 2012.
  4. ^ "Mount Whympher". BC Geographical Names. Retrieved 14 September 2019.
  5. ^ "Mount Whymper". summitpost.org. Retrieved 2 June 2012.
  6. ^ Henry, Emil William (2011). Triumph and Tragedy: The Life of Edward Whymper. Leicester: Matador – Troubadour Publishing. ISBN 978-1848765-788. Retrieved 22 June 2012.
  7. ^ Dave Jones, ed. (1987). "Whymper's Antiques Fueled Many a Conversation". CP Rail News. Retrieved 2 June 2012.
  8. ^ Sanford, Emerson; Sanford Beck, Janice (2008). Life of the Trail 2: Historic Hikes in Northern Yoho National Park. Surrey BC: Rocky Mountain Books. pp. 102–116. ISBN 978-1-897522-00-4.
  9. ^ "Mount Whymper (Frederick)". BC Geographical Names. Retrieved 14 September 2019.
  10. ^ "Mount Whymper British Columbia #1333". Bivouac.com. Retrieved 2 June 2012.
  11. ^ "Mt Whymper". SummitPost.org. Retrieved 2 June 2012.
  12. ^ Belyea, Helen R. (1960). The Story of the Mountains in Banff National Park (PDF). parkscanadahistory.com (Report). Ottawa: Geological Survey of Canada. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2 October 2015. Retrieved 13 September 2019.
  13. ^ Gadd, Ben (2008). Geology of the Rocky Mountains and Columbias.
  14. ^ Peel, M. C.; Finlayson, B. L.; McMahon, T. A. (2007). "Updated world map of the Köppen−Geiger climate classification". Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. 11: 1633–1644. ISSN 1027-5606.

Further reading