This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. (Learn how and when to remove these template messages) This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed.Find sources: "Munch" BDSM – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (July 2008) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) This article possibly contains original research. Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding inline citations. Statements consisting only of original research should be removed. (August 2015) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

A munch (derived from "burger munch") is a casual social gathering for people involved in or interested in kink, BDSM, alternative relationship lifestyles, or fetishes.[1] No BDSM, kink, or fetish activities take place, however.

Characteristics

Munches often take place at a restaurant, bar, coffee shop, or other public setting. A munch organizer usually reserves a large table, a back area, or a private room. People are free to arrive and leave within the specified hours. The primary purpose is socializing and meeting like-minded individuals. Munches are intended as opportunities for those who are curious about kink to meet others, become more comfortable, and better informed. Munches that involve alcohol are sometimes called "sloshes" or pub nights. Unlike a play party, munches are informal affairs that discourage fetish attire or BDSM play, though wearing of subtle collars or leather items may be permissible if they are nondescript.[2] Munches can be geared towards specific groups, such as LGBTIQA or BIPOC, while others may be focused on specific kinks such as Master/slave or submissive roundtables. Etiquette and rules tend to vary across munches.

Marketing

Munch organizers may post their event information on social networking sites, or use e-mail or mailing lists. Local BDSM/Kink groups may announce a munch in-person at a meeting, on a community calendar or newsletter, or on their own websites.

History

The USENET group alt.sex.bondage was a common meeting ground online; as was a San Francisco-area email list known as BABES (Bay Area Bondage Enthusiasts Society). While organizations such as the Society of Janus and the BackDrop Club existed, there were few informal ways to meet others socially within the fetish scene. After that initial meeting, an informal rotation of organizers and locations were instituted, with widely varying amounts of success.

The Kirk's Burger Munch attracted a large and often spirited crowd, some of which participated in discreet play. As time went on, the atmosphere became more overtly fetish and BDSM play oriented, and people started bringing in outside food. Ultimately, the management insisted that the group stop meeting there. Many of the original participants organized another social gathering just down the street, though STella (a member of BABES) requested they not use the name "burger munch". The name was shortened to "munch".

The term "Burger Munch" was also used in Boston in 1993.[3]

See also

References

  1. ^ Shorb, David (2019-07-02). "The BDSM Gathering Known As A Munch". Medium. Retrieved 2020-07-12.
  2. ^ "Munch: A Kink & BDSM Social Gathering". KYNK 101. Retrieved 2022-09-25.
  3. ^ "Boston Burgermunch - Google Groups". Usenet (Google Groups). 1993-09-04. As with all Burger Munches, this is open to *everyone*!