Oregon Ducks baseball
2023 Oregon Ducks baseball team
Founded1877, 146 years ago
UniversityUniversity of Oregon
Head coachMark Wasikowski (4th season)
ConferencePac-12
LocationEugene, Oregon
Home stadiumPK Park
(Capacity: 5,000)
NicknameDucks
ColorsGreen and yellow[1]
   
College World Series appearances
1954
NCAA regional champions
2012, 2023
NCAA Tournament appearances
1954, 1964, 2010, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2021, 2022, 2023
Conference tournament champions
2023
Regular season conference champions
1918, 1928, 1934, 1935, 1937, 1939, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1946, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1957

The Oregon Ducks baseball team represents the University of Oregon in NCAA Division I college baseball in the Pac-12 Conference. The home games are played on campus at PK Park.[2]

History

Oregon played its first baseball game in 1877 and established the program in 1885.[3]

The UO team made one College World Series appearance, in 1954, and was eliminated from the tournament after losing to Arizona and Massachusetts. A decade later in 1964, in the re-organized Athletic Association of Western Universities, Oregon was once again North Division champions,[4][5][6] but lost at defending national champion USC in the district finals (today's super-regionals).[7]

After the 1981 season, baseball and three other varsity sports were dropped by the university (men's gymnastics, women's golf, and women's soccer) due to a budget crisis,[3][8][9] and baseball became a club sport in March 1983.[10]

In July 2007, the university announced that it would again field a varsity baseball team, beginning with the 2009 season. One reason was the success of the rival Oregon State Beavers,[11][12][13] who had repeated as College World Series champions a month earlier.

In the Ducks' first game in PK Park, they defeated the defending national champions, the Fresno State Bulldogs, 1–0 on a walk-off single by senior Andrew Schmidt. A sellout crowd of 2,777 was on hand for the game.[14] After his eleventh season in 2019, head coach George Horton and the Ducks mutually agreed to part ways on May 28.[15] Two weeks later on June 11, it was announced that Mark Wasikowski was the successor; he was previously an assistant at Oregon from 2012 through 2016, then was the head coach at Purdue in the Big Ten Conference.[16] In his first full season as head coach of the Ducks, they hosted a regional as the 13th seed and finished second behind LSU.

Stadium

Hosting BYU in March 2011

The Ducks previously played baseball at Howe Field (44°02′28″N 123°04′26″W / 44.041°N 123.074°W / 44.041; -123.074),[9] south of McArthur Court, named in 1936 for Dr. Herbert Crombie Howe (1872–1940), the former chairman of the English department. Howe started teaching at UO in 1901 and was its original faculty representative to the Pacific Coast Conference in 1915, partially responsible for the league's founding.[17] When the university dropped baseball after the 1981 season, the succeeding club team continued at Howe; the field was converted to use by the Ducks' women's softball team in 1987.[18][19] Softball was formerly played at Amazon Park.[20]

Baseball became a club sport in 1983 and Oregon was the only Pac-10 school without a varsity baseball program through 2008. Following the reinstatement of baseball, announced in 2007,[11] the university built PK Park, directly northeast of Autzen Stadium, formerly paved parking spaces. It opened for the Ducks in 2009 and since 2010, the park is also home for the minor league Eugene Emeralds of the short season Northwest League,[2] whose season runs from mid-June through August.

Yearly Awards

Pac-12 Player of the Year

Pac-12 Pitcher of the Year

Yearly results

Oregon notes their first year of baseball as 1877, with 1906 as the first recorded season.[21]

Year Coach Record Notes
1906 J. B. Knapp
1907 Hugo Bezdek
1908 H. B. Leonard
1909 Tom Kelly 6–3–1
1910 Tom Kelly 6–4–1
1911 Tom Kelly 9–6
1912 Homer Jamison 8–0
1913 Homer Jamison
1914 Hugo Bezdek 11–3
1915 Hugo Bezdek 6–3
1916 Hugo Bezdek 5–4
1917 Hugo Bezdek
1918 Dean Walker 10–2
1919 Shy Huntington 1–6
1920 Shy Huntington 11–9
1921 George Bohler 6–13
1922 George Bohler 2–15
1923 George Bohler 3–15
1924 William Reinhart 6–12–1
1925 William Reinhart 5–7
1926 William Reinhart 4–4
1927 William Reinhart 3–9
1928 William Reinhart 11–4
1929 William Reinhart 8–9
1930 William Reinhart 15–7
1931 William Reinhart 8–10
1932 William Reinhart 5–10
1933 William Reinhart 7–6
1934 William Reinhart 16–6
1935 William Reinhart 14–8
1936 Howard Hobson 13–11
1937 Howard Hobson 13–3
1938 Howard Hobson 17–9
1939 Howard Hobson 20–7
1940 Howard Hobson 17–11
1941 Howard Hobson 15–6
1942 Howard Hobson 20–5
1943 Howard Hobson 15–7
1944 Howard Hobson
1945 Howard Hobson
1946 Howard Hobson 18–9–1
1947 Howard Hobson 19–7
1948 Don Kirsch 12–6
1949 Don Kirsch 18–7
1950 Don Kirsch 12–11
1951 Don Kirsch 14–14
1952 Don Kirsch 19–12
1953 Don Kirsch 15–4
1954 Don Kirsch 18–8 11–5 in PCC North Div., 1st place,[22] District 8 champion (now super regional),[23] College World Series, 7th (tie)
1955 Don Kirsch 18–8
1956 Don Kirsch 18–8
1957 Don Kirsch 24–9–1
1958 Don Kirsch 19–8
1959 Don Kirsch 19–11
1960 Don Kirsch 12–7
1961 Don Kirsch 19–9
1962 Don Kirsch 29–9–1
1963 Don Kirsch 25–7
1964 Don Kirsch 31–11 11–5 in AAWU North Div., 1st place,[4] runner-up in District 8 (now super regional)[7]
1965 Don Kirsch 27–8–1
1966 Don Kirsch 21–18
1967 Don Kirsch 16–14
1968 Don Kirsch 25–15–1
1969 Don Kirsch 22–19
1970 Don Kirsch
1971 Mel Krause 19–18
1972 Mel Krause 24–13
1973 Mel Krause 23–13
1974 Mel Krause 26–19
1975 Mel Krause 20–19
1976 Mel Krause 20–18
1977 Mel Krause 14–27
1978 Mel Krause 23–24
1979 Mel Krause 29–27–1
1980 Mel Krause 19–21
1981 Mel Krause 16–21 does not include 2 wins vs. Lane CC – dropped program[3][8]
No varsity team from 1982–2008 (27 seasons), club sport only
2009 George Horton 14–42 4–23 in Pac-10, 10th place
2010 George Horton 40–24 13–14 in Pac-10, 5th place (tie), second at Regional
2011 George Horton 33–26 11–16 in Pac-10, 8th place
2012 George Horton 46–19 19–11 in Pac-12, 3rd place, hosted Regional and Super Regional
2013 George Horton 48–16 22–8 in Pac-12, 2nd place, hosted Regional
2014 George Horton 44–20 18–12 in Pac-12, 4th place, second at Regional
2015 George Horton 38–25 16–14 in Pac-12, 6th place, third at Regional
2016 George Horton 29–26 14–16 in Pac-12, 8th place (tie)
2017 George Horton 30–25 12–18 in Pac-12, 8th place
2018 George Horton 26–29 12–18 in Pac-12, 8th place (tie)
2019 George Horton 27–29 10–19 in Pac-12, 9th place
2020 Mark Wasikowski 8–7 0–0 in Pac-12, *Season cancelled due to Covid-19
2021 Mark Wasikowski 39–16 20–10 in Pac-12, 2nd Place, hosted Regional
2022 Mark Wasikowski 36–25 18–12 in Pac-12, 4th place, third at Regional
2023 Mark Wasikowski 41–22 16–14 in Pac-12, 6th Place, hosted Super Regional

Oregon in the Pac-12 tournament

Year Record Pct Seed Notes
2022 0-2 .00 4th
2023 4-0 1.00 6th Won the tournament

Oregon in the NCAA tournament

Year Record Pct Nat'l
seed
Notes
1954 3–2 .600   District 8 champion, College World Series (7th)
1964 0–2 .000   District 8 runner-up (super regional)
2010 2–2 .500   finished second in Regional
2012 4–2 .667 5 Regional and Super Regional host
2013 3–2 .600 8 Regional host
2014 2–2 .500   finished second in Regional
2015 1–2 .333 finished third in Regional
2021 2–2 .500 13 Regional host
2022 1–2 .333 finished third in Regional
2023 4–2 .667 Super Regional host
TOTALS 22–20 .524  

Current roster

Name Number Position Year
Isaac Ayon 1 Right-handed Pitcher Sophomore
Jack Scanlon 2 Catcher Sophomore
Brennan Milone 3 Infielder Sophomore
Josh Kasevich 4 Infielder Sophomore
Gavin Grant 5 Infielder Junior
Christian Ciuffetelli 7 Right-handed Pitcher Junior
Sam Novitske 9 Infielder Junior
Taylor Holder 11 Outfielder Redshirt Freshman
Matt Dallas 12 Right-handed Pitcher Junior
Drew Cowley 15 Infielder Junior
Bennett Thompson 16 Catcher Freshman
Chase Meggers 19 Catcher Freshman
Logan Mercado 20 Right-handed Pitcher Sophomore
Jace Stoffal 21 Right-handed Pitcher Sophomore
Andrew Mosiello 23 Right-handed Pitcher Sophomore
Kolby Somers 24 Left-handed Pitcher Senior
Jacob Walsh 25 First Baseman Freshman
Colby Shade 26 Outfielder Sophomore
Josiah Cromwick 27 Catcher Sophomore
Bryce Boettcher 28 Utility Sophomore
Rio Britton 30 Left-handed Pitcher Sophomore
Tanner Smith 31 Outfielder Junior
Jacob Hughes 33 Right-handed Pitcher Freshman
Scott Ellis 34 Right-handed Pitcher Sophomore
Anthony Hall 35 Outfielder Sophomore
Caleb Sloan 36 Right-handed Pitcher Junior
Tyler Ganus 37 Utility Sophomore
William Riley 39 Utility Senior
Garrett Cutting 41 Infielder Freshman
Logan Paustian 43 Catcher Freshman
Dylan Sabia 45 Right-handed Pitcher Senior
Aiden Van Rensum 46 Infielder Freshman
Tommy Brandenburg 47 Right-handed Pitcher Freshman
Cho Tofte 50 Right-handed Pitcher Freshman
Adam Maier 51 Right-handed Pitcher Sophomore
Stone Churby 52 Right-handed Pitcher Junior
RJ Gordon 66 Right-handed Pitcher Sophomore
Anson Aroz 77 Catcher Freshman

Former players

See also

References

  1. ^ "Web Colors". University of Oregon Brand and Style Guide. Retrieved December 10, 2019.
  2. ^ a b May, Jacob (January 31, 2008). "Oregon unveils Duck baseball's Field of Dreams". Oregon Daily Emerald. (Eugene). Retrieved June 9, 2008.
  3. ^ a b c Rodman, Bob (May 7, 1981). "A gloomy day for Ducks' oldest program". Eugene-Register Guard. (Oregon). p. 1C.
  4. ^ a b Harvey, Paul, III (May 23, 1964). "Ducks clinch ND title". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). p. 1B.((cite news)): CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  5. ^ Strite, Dick (May 25, 1964). "Ducks can be as good as '54 team". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). p. 3B.
  6. ^ Harvey, Paul, III (May 28, 1964). "Oregon, USC nines seek district crown". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). p. 2B.((cite news)): CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  7. ^ a b Harvey, Paul, III (May 31, 1964). "USC dumps Oregon". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). p. 3B.((cite news)): CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  8. ^ a b "UO axes baseball, gymnastics". Eugene-Register Guard. (Oregon). May 7, 1981. p. 1C.
  9. ^ a b Rodman, Bob (May 27, 1982). "The question isn't what for Howe". Eugene-Register Guard. (Oregon). p. 1C.
  10. ^ Rodman, Bob (March 1, 1983). "Oregon baseball* returns this weekend". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). p. 5C.
  11. ^ a b "Baseball's back". Eugene Register-Guard. Oregon. (editorial). July 14, 2007. p. A14.
  12. ^ "University of Oregon is bringing back baseball". Moscow-Pullman Daily News. (Idaho-Washington). Associated Press. July 14, 2007. p. 1B.
  13. ^ Smith, Jeff (July 14, 2007). "Baseball no longer a dead Duck". The Oregonian. (Portland). Retrieved July 14, 2007.
  14. ^ "Schmidt's Walk-Off Upsets Defending Champs". GoDucks.com. February 27, 2009. Retrieved February 28, 2009.
  15. ^ James Crepea (May 28, 2019). "Oregon Ducks, baseball coach George Horton parting ways". www.oregonlive.com. Oregon Live LLC. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  16. ^ James Crepea (June 11, 2019). "Oregon Ducks hire Purdue's Mark Wasikowski, former UO assistant, as baseball coach". www.oregonlive.com. Oregon Live LLC. Retrieved June 12, 2019.
  17. ^ "Now it's Howe Field". Eugene Register-Guard. Oregon. April 25, 1936. p. 2.
  18. ^ "Howe Field". University of Oregon Athletics. Retrieved November 11, 2015.
  19. ^ Kayfes, Dave (April 4, 1985). "UO baseball, out at home?". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). p. 1B.
  20. ^ "Wet weather stops baseball, softball". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). April 26, 1978. p. 6C.
  21. ^ "2018 Record Book" (PDF). goducks.com. Oregon Ducks Athletics. pp. 1, 44. Retrieved March 10, 2018.
  22. ^ Strite, Dick (May 23, 1954). "Oregon blanks OSC nine for NCAA spot". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). p. 1C.
  23. ^ Strite, Dick (June 1, 1954). "Oregon wins regional title". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). p. 2B.