College World Series
College World Series logo
First played1947
Most recently played2023
Current championLSU

The College World Series (CWS), officially the NCAA Men's College World Series (MCWS), is a baseball tournament held each June in Omaha, Nebraska. The MCWS is the culmination of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Baseball Championship tournament—featuring 64 teams in the first round—which determines the NCAA Division I college baseball champion. The eight participating teams are split into two, four-team, double-elimination brackets, with the winners of each bracket playing in a best-of-three championship series.

History

The first edition of the College World Series was held in 1947 at Hyames Field in Kalamazoo, Michigan. The tournament was held there again in 1948, but was moved to Lawrence Stadium in Wichita, Kansas for the 1949 tournament. Since 1950, the College World Series (CWS) has been held in Omaha, Nebraska.[1][2] It was held at Rosenblatt Stadium from 1950 through 2010; starting in 2011, it has been held at Charles Schwab Field Omaha (formerly TD Ameritrade Park Omaha). The name "College World Series" is derived from that of the Major League Baseball World Series championship; it is currently an MLB trademark licensed to the NCAA.[3]

The event's official name was changed to "Men's College World Series" no later than 2008. The most recent hosting agreement between the NCAA and the city of Omaha and related entities, signed in that year, states, "The official name of the [championship] shall be the NCAA Men's College World Series". However, as of October 2021, the CWS logo still appeared on the NCAA's official D-I baseball tournament bracket, and on the front page of the NCAA's official CWS website, without the word "Men's".[4] The NCAA has since added "Men's" to the event's logo, and both the NCAA and College World Series of Omaha, Inc. (CWS Omaha), the nonprofit group that organizes the event, now consistently use the phrase "Men's College World Series" to describe it.[5]

On March 13, 2020, it was announced that the 2020 College World Series was canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the first time in the event's history it had been canceled.[6]

Contract extension

On June 10, 2008, the NCAA and CWS Omaha announced a new 25-year contract extension, keeping the MCWS in Omaha through 2035.[7] A memorandum of understanding had been reached by all parties on April 30.[8]

The currently binding contract began in 2011, the same year the tournament moved from Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium to the venue now known as Charles Schwab Field Omaha, a new ballpark across from CHI Health Center Omaha.

Format history and changes

See also: NCAA Division I Baseball Championship § Past formats

2006 College World Series Championship game (University of North Carolina versus Oregon State University) at Rosenblatt Stadium in Omaha, Nebraska.
Before expanding to 64 teams in 1999, the 1998 Division I tournament began with 48 teams, split into 8 six-team regionals. The 8 regional winners advanced to the College World Series. The regionals were a test of endurance, as teams had to win at least four games over four days, sometimes five if a team dropped into the loser's bracket, placing a premium on pitching. In the last two years of the six-team regional format, the eventual CWS champion – LSU in 1997 and Southern California in 1998 – had to battle back from the loser's bracket in the regional to advance to Omaha.

Results

Year Champion Coach Score Runner-up Most Outstanding Player Stadium City
1947 California Clint Evans 17–8, 8–7 Yale Hyames Field Kalamazoo, MI
1948 Southern California Sam Barry 3–1, 3–8, 9–2 Yale Hyames Field Kalamazoo, MI
1949 Texas Bibb Falk 10–3 Wake Forest Tom Hamilton, Texas Lawrence–Dumont Stadium Wichita, KS
1950 Texas Bibb Falk 3–0 Washington State Ray VanCleef, Rutgers Omaha Municipal Stadium Omaha, NE
1951 Oklahoma Jack Baer 3–2 Tennessee Sidney Hatfield, Tennessee Omaha Municipal Stadium Omaha, NE
1952 Holy Cross Jack Barry 8–4 Missouri James O'Neill, Holy Cross Omaha Municipal Stadium Omaha, NE
1953 Michigan Ray Fisher 7–5 Texas J.L. Smith, Texas Omaha Municipal Stadium Omaha, NE
1954 Missouri Hi Simmons 4–1 Rollins Tom Yewcic, Michigan State Omaha Municipal Stadium Omaha, NE
1955 Wake Forest Taylor Sanford 7–6 Western Michigan Tom Borland, Oklahoma A&M Omaha Municipal Stadium Omaha, NE
1956 Minnesota Dick Siebert 12–1 Arizona Jerry Thomas, Minnesota Omaha Municipal Stadium Omaha, NE
1957 California George Wolfman 1–0 Penn State Cal Emery, Penn State Omaha Municipal Stadium Omaha, NE
1958 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 8–7 Missouri Bill Thom, Southern California Omaha Municipal Stadium Omaha, NE
1959 Oklahoma State Toby Greene 5–3 Arizona Jim Dobson, Oklahoma State Omaha Municipal Stadium Omaha, NE
1960 Minnesota Dick Siebert 2–1 Southern California John Erickson, Minnesota Omaha Municipal Stadium Omaha, NE
1961 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 1–0 Oklahoma State Littleton Fowler, Oklahoma State Omaha Municipal Stadium Omaha, NE
1962 Michigan Don Lund 5–4 Santa Clara Bob Garibaldi, Santa Clara Omaha Municipal Stadium Omaha, NE
1963 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 5–2 Arizona Bud Hollowell, Southern California Omaha Municipal Stadium Omaha, NE
1964 Minnesota Dick Siebert 5–1 Missouri Joe Ferris, Maine Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1965 Arizona State Bobby Winkles 2–1 Ohio State Sal Bando, Arizona State Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1966 Ohio State Marty Karow 8–2 Oklahoma State Steve Arlin, Ohio State Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1967 Arizona State Bobby Winkles 11–2 Houston Ron Davini, Arizona State Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1968 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 4–3 Southern Illinois Bill Seinsoth, Southern California Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1969 Arizona State Bobby Winkles 10–1 Tulsa John Dolinsek, Arizona State Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1970 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 2–1 Florida State Gene Ammann, Florida State Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1971 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 7–2 Southern Illinois Jerry Tabb, Tulsa Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1972 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 1–0 Arizona State Russ McQueen, Southern California Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1973 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 4–3 Arizona State Dave Winfield, Minnesota Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1974 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 7–3 Miami (FL) George Milke, Southern California Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1975 Texas Cliff Gustafson 5–1 South Carolina Mickey Reichenbach, Texas Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1976 Arizona Jerry Kindall 7–1 Eastern Michigan Steve Powers, Arizona Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1977 Arizona State Jim Brock 2–1 South Carolina Bob Horner, Arizona State Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1978 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 10–3 Arizona State Rod Boxberger, Southern California Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1979 Cal State Fullerton Augie Garrido 2–1 Arkansas Tony Hudson, Cal State Fullerton Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1980 Arizona Jerry Kindall 5–3 Hawaii Terry Francona, Arizona Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1981 Arizona State Jim Brock 7–4 Oklahoma State Stan Holmes, Arizona State Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1982 Miami (FL) Ron Fraser 9–3 Wichita State Dan Smith, Miami (FL) Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1983 Texas Cliff Gustafson 4–3 Alabama Calvin Schiraldi, Texas Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1984 Cal State Fullerton Augie Garrido 3–1 Texas John Fishel, Cal State Fullerton Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1985 Miami (FL) Ron Fraser 10–6 Texas Greg Ellena, Miami (FL) Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1986 Arizona Jerry Kindall 10–2 Florida State Mike Senne, Arizona Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1987 Stanford Mark Marquess 9–5 Oklahoma State Paul Carey, Stanford Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1988 Stanford Mark Marquess 9–4 Arizona State Lee Plemel, Stanford Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1989 Wichita State Gene Stephenson 5–3 Texas Greg Brummett, Wichita State Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1990 Georgia Steve Webber 2–1 Oklahoma State Mike Rebhan, Georgia Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1991 LSU Skip Bertman 6–3 Wichita State Gary Hymel, LSU Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1992 Pepperdine Andy Lopez 3–2 Cal State Fullerton Phil Nevin, Cal State Fullerton Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1993 LSU Skip Bertman 8–0 Wichita State Todd Walker, LSU Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1994 Oklahoma Larry Cochell 13–5 Georgia Tech Chip Glass, Oklahoma Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1995 Cal State Fullerton Augie Garrido 11–5 Southern California Mark Kotsay, Cal State Fullerton Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1996 LSU Skip Bertman 9–8 Miami (FL) Pat Burrell, Miami (FL) Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1997 LSU Skip Bertman 13–6 Alabama Brandon Larson, LSU Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1998 Southern California Mike Gillespie 21–14 Arizona State Wes Rachels, Southern California Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
1999 Miami (FL) Jim Morris 6–5 Florida State Marshall McDougall, Florida State Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
2000 LSU Skip Bertman 6–5 Stanford Trey Hodges, LSU Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
2001 Miami (FL) Jim Morris 12–1 Stanford Charlton Jimerson, Miami (FL) Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
2002 Texas Augie Garrido 12–6 South Carolina Huston Street, Texas Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
2003 Rice Wayne Graham 4–310, 3–8, 14–2 Stanford John Hudgins, Stanford Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
2004 Cal State Fullerton George Horton 6–4, 3–2 Texas Jason Windsor, Cal State Fullerton Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
2005 Texas Augie Garrido 4–2, 6–2 Florida David Maroul, Texas Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
2006 Oregon State Pat Casey 3–4, 11–7, 3–2 North Carolina Jonah Nickerson, Oregon State Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
2007 Oregon State Pat Casey 11–4, 9–3 North Carolina Jorge Luis Reyes, Oregon State Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
2008 Fresno State Mike Batesole 6–7, 19–10, 6–1 Georgia Tommy Mendonca, Fresno State Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
2009 LSU Paul Mainieri 7–6, 1–5, 11–4 Texas Jared Mitchell, LSU Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
2010 South Carolina Ray Tanner 7–1, 2–111 UCLA Jackie Bradley Jr., South Carolina Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium Omaha, NE
2011 South Carolina Ray Tanner 2–111, 5–2 Florida Scott Wingo, South Carolina TD Ameritrade Park Omaha, NE
2012 Arizona Andy Lopez 5–1, 4–1 South Carolina Rob Refsnyder, Arizona TD Ameritrade Park Omaha, NE
2013 UCLA John Savage 3–1, 8–0 Mississippi State Adam Plutko, UCLA TD Ameritrade Park Omaha, NE
2014 Vanderbilt Tim Corbin 9–8, 2–7, 3–2 Virginia Dansby Swanson, Vanderbilt TD Ameritrade Park Omaha, NE
2015 Virginia Brian O'Connor 1–5, 3–0, 4–2 Vanderbilt Josh Sborz, Virginia TD Ameritrade Park Omaha, NE
2016 Coastal Carolina Gary Gilmore 0–3, 5–4, 4–3 Arizona Andrew Beckwith, Coastal Carolina TD Ameritrade Park Omaha, NE
2017 Florida Kevin O'Sullivan 4–3, 6–1 LSU Alex Faedo, Florida TD Ameritrade Park Omaha, NE
2018 Oregon State Pat Casey 1–4, 5–3, 5–0 Arkansas Adley Rutschman, Oregon State TD Ameritrade Park Omaha, NE
2019 Vanderbilt Tim Corbin 4–7, 4–1, 8–2 Michigan Kumar Rocker, Vanderbilt TD Ameritrade Park Omaha, NE
2020 Canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic
2021 Mississippi State Chris Lemonis 2–8, 13–2, 9–0 Vanderbilt Will Bednar, Mississippi State TD Ameritrade Park Omaha, NE
2022 Ole Miss Mike Bianco 10–3, 4–2 Oklahoma Dylan DeLucia, Ole Miss Charles Schwab Field Omaha, NE
2023 LSU Jay Johnson 4–311, 4–24, 18–4 Florida Paul Skenes, LSU Charles Schwab Field Omaha, NE

Teams reaching the finals

Teams reaching the finals
Team Titles Runners-up Finals
Appearances
Southern California 12 (1948, 1958, 1961, 1963, 1968, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1978, 1998) 2 (1960, 1995) 14
LSU 7 (1991, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2009, 2023) 1 (2017) 8
Texas 6 (1949, 1950, 1975, 1983, 2002, 2005) 6 (1953, 1984, 1985, 1989, 2004, 2009) 12
Arizona State 5 (1965, 1967, 1969, 1977, 1981) 5 (1972, 1973, 1978, 1988, 1998) 10
Arizona 4 (1976, 1980, 1986, 2012) 4 (1956, 1959, 1963, 2016) 8
Miami (FL) 4 (1982, 1985, 1999, 2001) 2 (1974, 1996) 6
Cal State Fullerton 4 (1979, 1984, 1995, 2004) 1 (1992) 5
Minnesota 3 (1956, 1960, 1964) 3
Oregon State 3 (2006, 2007, 2018) 3
South Carolina 2 (2010, 2011) 4 (1975, 1977, 2002, 2012) 6
Stanford 2 (1987, 1988) 3 (2000, 2001, 2003) 5
Vanderbilt 2 (2014, 2019) 2 (2015, 2021) 4
Michigan 2 (1953, 1962) 1 (2019) 3
Oklahoma 2 (1951, 1994) 1 (2022) 3
California 2 (1947, 1957) 2
Oklahoma State 1 (1959) 5 (1961, 1966, 1981, 1987, 1990) 6
Florida 1 (2017) 3 (2005, 2011, 2023) 4
Missouri 1 (1954) 3 (1952, 1958, 1964) 4
Wichita State 1 (1989) 3 (1982, 1991, 1993) 4
Wake Forest 1 (1955) 1 (1949) 2
Ohio State 1 (1966) 1 (1965) 2
Georgia 1 (1990) 1 (2008) 2
UCLA 1 (2013) 1 (2010) 2
Virginia 1 (2015) 1 (2014) 2
Mississippi State 1 (2021) 1 (2013) 2
Coastal Carolina 1 (2016) 1
Fresno State 1 (2008) 1
Holy Cross 1 (1952) 1
Ole Miss 1 (2022) 1
Pepperdine 1 (1992) 1
Rice 1 (2003) 1
Florida State 3 (1970, 1986, 1999) 3
Yale 2 (1947, 1948) 2
Southern Illinois 2 (1968, 1971) 2
Alabama 2 (1997, 1983) 2
North Carolina 2 (2006, 2007) 2
Arkansas 2 (1979, 2018) 2
Washington State 1 (1950) 1
Tennessee 1 (1951) 1
Rollins 1 (1954) 1
Western Michigan 1 (1955) 1
Penn State 1 (1957) 1
Santa Clara 1 (1962) 1
Houston 1 (1967) 1
Tulsa 1 (1969) 1
Eastern Michigan 1 (1976) 1
Hawaii 1 (1980) 1
Georgia Tech 1 (1994) 1

Best performances by conference

Rank Conference Titles
1 Pac-12 18
2 Southeastern (SEC) 15
3 Western Athletic (WAC) 7
4 Big Ten 6
4 PCC-CIBA 6
6 Independents 5
7 Big Eight 4
7 Southwest 4
9 Atlantic Coast (ACC) 2
9 Big 12 2
9 Big West (BWC) 2
9 Big West (SCBA) 2
13 Big South (BSC) 1
13 Missouri Valley (MVC) 1
13 West Coast (WCC) 1

Awards

The College World Series Most Outstanding Player award is presented to the best player at each College World Series finals (first awarded in 1949).[16]

An All-Tournament Team consisting of the best players of the tournament has also been announced for each tournament since 1958.

Records and statistics

All-time record for champions

Main article: List of College World Series appearances by team

Team Appearances First Last Wins Losses Pct. Titles
Texas 38 1949 2022 88 63 .583 6
Miami (FL) 25 1974 2016 48 42 .533 4
Arizona State 22 1964 2010 61 38 .616 5
Southern California 21 1948 2001 74 26 .740 12
Oklahoma State[a] 20 1954 2016 40 38 .513 1
LSU 19 1986 2023 46 29 .613 7
Stanford 19 1953 2023 41 31 .569 2
Arizona 18 1954 2021 43 32 .573 4
Cal State Fullerton 18 1975 2017 34 31 .523 4
Florida 13 1988 2023 21 24 .467 1
Mississippi State 12 1971 2021 18 24 .429 1
South Carolina 11 1975 2012 32 20 .615 2
Oklahoma 11 1951 2022 15 16 .484 2
Michigan 8 1953 2019 16 14 .533 2
Oregon State 7 1952 2018 20 12 .625 3
Wichita State 7 1982 1996 16 11 .593 1
Rice 7 1997 2008 10 13 .435 1
Missouri 6 1952 1964 18 11 .621 1
Ole Miss 6 1956 2022 10 11 .476 1
California 6 1947 2011 11 8 .579 2
Georgia 6 1987 2008 10 11 .476 1
Vanderbilt 5 2011 2021 20 10 .667 2
Minnesota 5 1956 1977 17 7 .708 3
Virginia 6 2009 2023 12 8 .600 1
UCLA 5 1969 2013 9 9 .500 1
Holy Cross 4 1952 1963 9 7 .563 1
Ohio State 4 1951 1967 9 7 .563 1
Fresno State 4 1959 2008 9 8 .529 1
Pepperdine 2 1979 1992 7 2 .778 1
Wake Forest 2 1949 2023 7 3 .700 1
Coastal Carolina 1 2016 2016 6 2 .750 1

Most appearances without an MCWS championship

Top 10
Rank School Appearances Wins MCWS Winning % Runner-up Wins Per Appearance
1 Florida State 23 30 .387 3 1.30
2 Clemson 12 12 .333 0 1.00
3 North Carolina 11 18 .439 2 1.64
3 Arkansas 11 15 .429 2 1.50
4 Northern Colorado 10 3 .130 0 0.30
5 Maine 7 7 .333 0 1.00
5 Texas A&M 7 3 .176 0 0.43
6 Western Michigan 6 9 .429 1 1.50
6 St. John's (NY) 6 6 .333 0 1.00
6 Auburn 6 3 .231 0 0.50

Most MCWS participants by one conference in a year

Minimum three participants
Number Year Conference Programs MCWS Winner
4 1997 SEC Alabama, Auburn, LSU, Mississippi State LSU
4 2004 SEC Arkansas, Georgia, LSU, South Carolina Cal State Fullerton
4 2006 ACC Clemson, Georgia Tech, Miami (FL), North Carolina Oregon State
4 2015 SEC Arkansas, Florida, LSU, Vanderbilt Virginia
4 2019 SEC Arkansas, Auburn, Mississippi State, Vanderbilt Vanderbilt
4 2022 SEC Arkansas, Auburn, Ole Miss, Texas A&M[b] Ole Miss
3 1988 Pac-12 Arizona State, California, Stanford Stanford
3 1990 SEC Georgia, LSU, Mississippi State Georgia
3 1996 SEC Alabama, Florida, LSU LSU
3 1998 SEC Florida, LSU, Mississippi State Southern California
3 2005 Big 12 Baylor, Nebraska, Texas Texas
3 2008 ACC Florida State, Miami (FL), North Carolina Fresno State
3 2011 SEC Florida, South Carolina, Vanderbilt South Carolina
3 2012 SEC Arkansas, Florida, South Carolina Arizona
3 2014 Big 12 TCU, Texas, Texas Tech Vanderbilt
3 2016 Big 12 Oklahoma State, TCU, Texas Tech Coastal Carolina
3 2017 SEC Florida, LSU, Texas A&M Florida
3 2018 SEC Arkansas, Florida, Mississippi State Oregon State
3 2021 SEC Vanderbilt, Mississippi State, Tennessee Mississippi State
3 2023 SEC Florida, LSU, Tennessee LSU
  1. ^ Before 1957, Oklahoma State University was known as Oklahoma A&M.
  2. ^ In addition to the four current SEC members, two other participants in that edition, Oklahoma and Texas, announced in 2021 that they would join the SEC no later than 2025 (2026 season). Both would later be confirmed as joining the SEC for the 2025 season.

See also

Notes

References

  1. ^ "College World Series of Omaha, Inc. - Creighton University". Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  2. ^ CWS History[permanent dead link]. CWS Omaha, Inc. Retrieved 2017-02-11.
  3. ^ NCAA Trademarks – NCAA.org Archived 2017-05-05 at the Wayback Machine, footnote at bottom: "College World Series and Women's College World Series: The NCAA is the exclusive licensee of these marks, registered by Major League Baseball, in connection with the NCAA Division I Men's Baseball Championship and the Division I Women's Softball Championship."
  4. ^ "NCAA External Gender Equity Review: Phase II". Kaplan Hecker & Fink LLP. October 25, 2021. p. 70. Retrieved November 2, 2021.
  5. ^ See, e.g., the NCAA Division I baseball home page, with linked stories consistently using "Men's College World Series"; the NCAA's official MCWS home page; and the CWS Omaha home page.
  6. ^ "2020 NCAA Tournament canceled due to growing threat of coronavirus pandemic".
  7. ^ "NCAA Men's College World Series 2008 - NCAA Signs 25-Year Agreement with College World Series of Omaha Inc". Archived from the original on 2008-06-12. Retrieved 2008-06-12. NCAA Signs 25-Year Agreement with College World Series of Omaha, Inc.
  8. ^ "NCAA Men's College World Series 2008 - NCAA Memorandum of Understanding Paves the Way for Extending the Road to Omaha through 2035". Archived from the original on 2008-06-12. Retrieved 2008-06-12. NCAA Memorandum of Understanding...
  9. ^ "General CWS Records, All-Time Won-Lost by Conference, Pg 19" (PDF). NCAA.org. Retrieved June 12, 2016.
  10. ^ "Big 12 National Championships". NeuLion, Inc. Retrieved 1 July 2017.
  11. ^ "The College Football Report's Long (Somewhat) And Illustrious (Kind Of) History Of The Big Six". The Beachwood Media Company. 23 September 2011. Retrieved 1 July 2017.
  12. ^ "Western Athletic Conference Official Site - National Champions". Western Athletic Conference. Archived from the original on 14 October 2016. Retrieved 1 July 2017.
  13. ^ "Western Athletic Conference Official Site - WAC Timeline". Western Athletic Conference. Archived from the original on 26 June 2017. Retrieved 1 July 2017.
  14. ^ "Baseball_Tournament_Records.pdf" (PDF). Western Athletic Conference. Retrieved 1 July 2017.[permanent dead link]
  15. ^ "Coastal Carolina to join Sun Belt Conference in July 2016". Ncaa.com.
  16. ^ "General CWS Records" (PDF). NCAA. Retrieved April 17, 2022.