Ozark
Location of Ozark in Dale County, Alabama.
Location of Ozark in Dale County, Alabama.
Coordinates: 31°26′53″N 85°38′31″W / 31.44806°N 85.64194°W / 31.44806; -85.64194
CountryUnited States
StateAlabama
CountyDale
Settled1822
IncorporatedOctober 27, 1870
Government
 • TypeMayor/City Council
 • MayorMark Blankenship
Area
 • Total34.34 sq mi (88.94 km2)
 • Land34.10 sq mi (88.33 km2)
 • Water0.23 sq mi (0.61 km2)
Elevation
417 ft (127 m)
Population
 (2020)
 • Total14,368
 • Density421.30/sq mi (162.66/km2)
Time zoneUTC-6 (Central (CST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP codes
36360-36361
Area code(s)334
FIPS code01-57648
GNIS feature ID0152832
Websitewww.ozarkalabama.us

Ozark is a city in and the county seat of Dale County, Alabama, United States. As of the 2010 census, the population of the city was 14,907.[2]

Ozark is the principal city of the Ozark Micropolitan Statistical Area, as well as a part of the Dothan-Ozark Combined Statistical Area. Ozark was originally a part of Enterprise–Ozark micropolitan area before being split,[3] and for a longer while was originally part of the Dothan-Enterprise-Ozark combined statistical area but Enterprise is now its own separate primary statistical area in later censuses.[4][5] Fort Rucker, the primary flight training base for Army Aviation, abuts Ozark.

History

The Ozark area was originally inhabited by the Muscogee people. It is said that Ozark received its name after a traveler visited and was reminded of the Ozark Mountains in Arkansas.

The first known European settler in Ozark was John Merrick, Sr., a veteran of the Revolutionary War, in 1822. In honor of him, the town was named Merricks. It was later changed to Woodshop, which was its name when the town received its post office. The first appearance of the name Ozark was in 1855, when the citizens requested a name change.[6]

The county seat was moved from Newton to Ozark 1870.[6][7]

Ozark is home to three sites listed on the National Register of Historic Places: the Claybank Log Church, the Samuel Lawson Dowling House, and the J. D. Holman House.

Geography

Ozark is located at 31°26′53″N 85°38′31″W / 31.44806°N 85.64194°W / 31.44806; -85.64194 (31.448169, -85.642009).[8] It is part of the Wiregrass Region.

Major highways that run through the city include U.S. Route 231 and Alabama State Routes 27 and 249. US 231 runs northwest to southeast through the city, leading northwest 34 mi (55 km) to Troy and southeast 23 mi (37 km) to Dothan. SR 27 leads east 31 mi (50 km) to Abbeville and southwest 19 mi (31 km) to Enterprise.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 34.5 square miles (89 km2) of which 34.2 square miles (89 km2) is land and 0.2 square miles (0.52 km2) (0.70%) is water.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880512
18901,195133.4%
19001,57031.4%
19102,22942.0%
19202,51813.0%
19303,10323.2%
19403,60116.0%
19505,23845.5%
19609,53482.0%
197013,55542.2%
198013,188−2.7%
199012,922−2.0%
200015,11917.0%
201014,907−1.4%
202014,368−3.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[9]

2000 census

At the 2000 census, there were 15,119 people, 6,126 households, and 4,233 families living in the city. The population density was 441.5 inhabitants per square mile (170.5/km2). There were 6,955 housing units at an average density of 203.1 per square mile (78.4/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 68.28% White, 28.30% Black or African American, 0.67% Native American, 0.70% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.46% from other races, and 1.53% from two or more races. 2.08% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Of the 6,126 households 31.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.8% were married couples living together, 16.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.9% were non-families. 27.7% of households were one person and 10.6% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.40 and the average family size was 2.92.

The age distribution was 24.9% under the age of 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 26.0% from 25 to 44, 24.7% from 45 to 64, and 15.9% 65 or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 87.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.4 males.

The median household income was $29,330 and the median family income was $38,633. Males had a median income of $30,236 versus $19,564 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,984. About 14.8% of families and 19.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.0% of those under age 18 and 18.0% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

At the 2010 census, there were 14,907 people, 6,209 households, and 4,064 families living in the city. The population density was 440 inhabitants per square mile (170/km2). There were 6,920 housing units at an average density of 201.1 per square mile (77.6/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 64.8% White, 30.2% Black or African American, 0.7% Native American, 0.9% Asian, 0.0% Pacific Islander, 0.8% from other races, and 2.6% from two or more races. 3.2% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Bob Bunting, Mayor of Ozark
Bob Bunting, Mayor of Ozark

Of the 6,209 households 26.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.3% were married couples living together, 17.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.5% were non-families. 30.5% of households were one person and 12.0% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 2.91.

The age distribution was 23.1% under the age of 18, 8.4% from 18 to 24, 23.1% from 25 to 44, 28.2% from 45 to 64, and 17.2% 65 or older. The median age was 41.2 years. For every 100 females, there were 90.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.6 males.

The median household income was $41,079 and the median family income was $52,061. Males had a median income of $41,513 versus $28,227 for females. The per capita income for the city was $22,103. About 13.6% of families and 18.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.2% of those under age 18 and 14.4% of those age 65 or over.

2020 census

Ozark racial composition[10]
Race Num. Perc.
White (non-Hispanic) 8,147 56.7%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic) 4,760 33.13%
Native American 65 0.45%
Asian 151 1.05%
Pacific Islander 8 0.06%
Other/Mixed 671 4.67%
Hispanic or Latino 566 3.94%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 14,368 people, 5,946 households, and 3,651 families residing in the city.

Education

Ozark is served by the Ozark City Schools. Schools located in the city are Carroll High School (grades 9 through 12), Carroll Career Center (grades 9 through 12), D.A. Smith Middle School (grades 6 through 8), Harry N. Mixon Intermediate School (grades 3 through 5), and Joseph W. Lisenby Primary School (grades k through 2.)

There is one private school in Ozark – Harvest Christian School (K-12).

Post-secondary education is available at Enterprise State Community College's Alabama Aviation Center at Ozark. Programs are offered in aviation maintenance technology.

Media

Radio stations

Newspaper

Notable people

See also

References

  1. ^ "2020 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  2. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Ozark city, Alabama". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved October 2, 2015.[dead link]
  3. ^ "Table 1. Annual Estimates of the Population of Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2009 (CBSA-EST2009-01)". 2009 Population Estimates. United States Census Bureau, Population Division. 2010-03-23. Archived from the original (CSV) on 2010-03-26. Retrieved 2010-03-24.
  4. ^ www.2census.gov (PDF). US Census Bureau https://www2.census.gov/geo/maps/econ/ec2012/csa/EC2012_330M200US222M.pdf. Retrieved 14 December 2021. ((cite web)): Missing or empty |title= (help)
  5. ^ "OMB Bulletin No. 20-01: Revised Delineations of Metropolitan Statistical Areas, Micropolitan Statistical Areas, and Combined Statistical Areas, and Guidance on Uses of the Delineations of These Areas" (PDF). United States Office of Management and Budget. March 6, 2020. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  6. ^ a b Watson, Fred Shelton (1968). Forgotten trails: a history of Dale County, Alabama, 1824–1966. Birmingham, Alabama: Banner Press. p. 288.
  7. ^ Hoskins Morton, Patricia (10 December 2010). "Dale County". Encyclopedia of Alabama. Retrieved 1 February 2010.
  8. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  9. ^ United States Census Bureau. "Census of Population and Housing". Retrieved June 7, 2014.
  10. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved 2021-12-17.

Coordinates: 31°26′53″N 85°38′31″W / 31.448169°N 85.642009°W / 31.448169; -85.642009