Pat Dwyer
Biographical details
Born(1884-08-30)August 30, 1884
Fall Brook, Pennsylvania
DiedMarch 29, 1939(1939-03-29) (aged 54)
Philipsburg, Pennsylvania
Playing career
1906–1907Penn
Position(s)Center
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1908Auburn (assistant)
1911–1913LSU
1918–1920Scott HS (OH)
1922Detroit (assistant)
1923–1925Toledo
Head coaching record
Overall28–22–2 (college_
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
1 Northwest Ohio League (1923)

James K. "Pat" Dwyer (August 30, 1884 – March 29, 1939) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head coach at Louisiana State University (1911–1913)[1] and the University of Toledo (1923–1925),[2] compiling a career record of 28–22–2.

Playing career

Dwyer was a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania. He lettered in football two seasons, 1906 and 1907, for Penn under coach Carl Sheldon Williams.[3] In 1906, Dwyer helped the Quakers to a 7–2–3 record. In 1907, Penn went 11–1, and was retroactively awarded a national championship by Parke H. Davis with other organizations naming Yale as champion.[4] These Penn teams were led by All-Americans August Ziegler at guard and Dexter Draper at tackle.[5]

Coaching career

Dwyer coached football from 1918 to 1920 at Scott High School in Toledo Ohio.[6]

Death

Dwyer died in 1939 of a heart attack.[7]

Head coaching record

College

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
LSU Tigers (Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1911–1913)
1911 LSU 6–3 1–1
1912 LSU 4–3 1–3
1913 LSU 6–1–2 1–1–1
LSU: 16–7–2 3–5–1
Toledo Rockets (Northwest Ohio League) (1923–1925)
1923 Toledo 6–4 3–0 1st
1924 Toledo 5–3
1925 Toledo 1–8 1–0
Toledo: 12–15
Total: 28–22–2
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title or championship game berth

References

  1. ^ "LSU Year-by-Year Records" (PDF). lsusports.net. p. 107. Retrieved July 29, 2018.
  2. ^ "2009 Toledo Football Media Guide" (PDF). University of Toledo. August 1, 2009. p. 159. Retrieved April 11, 2010.
  3. ^ 2006 University of Pennsylvania Football Media Guide, p. 139, accessed February 4, 2007
  4. ^ 2006 University of Pennsylvania Football Media Guide, p. 15
  5. ^ 2006 University of Pennsylvania Football Media Guide, p. 135
  6. ^ "Pat Dwyer May Coach Wash. And Jeff. Next Fall". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. November 28, 1920. Retrieved September 3, 2020 – via Newspapers.com open access.
  7. ^ "James K. Dwyer". Wellsboro Agitator. Wellsboro, Pennsylvania. March 29, 1939. Retrieved January 18, 2016 – via Newspapers.com open access.