Queensland Performing Arts Centre
QPAC
QPAC Exterior.jpg
View of the western side of the Queensland Performing Arts Centre
Coordinates27°28′30″S 153°01′12″E / 27.47500°S 153.02000°E / -27.47500; 153.02000Coordinates: 27°28′30″S 153°01′12″E / 27.47500°S 153.02000°E / -27.47500; 153.02000
Public transitSouth Brisbane railway station
Cultural Centre busway station
South Bank 1 & 2 ferry wharf
TypePerforming arts center
Capacity
  • Lyric Theatre: 2,000
  • Concert Hall: 1,800
  • Playhouse: 850
  • Cremorne Theatre: 300
Construction
Opened1985 (1985)
Renovated2011-2012
Architect
BuilderBarclay Mowlem[1]
Website
www.qpac.com.au

The Queensland Performing Arts Centre (also known as QPAC) is part of the Queensland Cultural Centre and is located on the corner of Melbourne Street and Grey Street in Brisbane's South Bank precinct. Opened in 1985, it includes the Lyric Theatre, Concert Hall, Playhouse and Cremorne Theatre.

History

QPAC was designed by local architect Robin Gibson in the mid-1970s, after State Cabinet formally recognised in 1972 the need for a new Queensland Art Gallery and a new major performing arts centre, in addition to a new location for the Queensland Museum and State Library. It was opened by the Duke of Kent in 1985.

Although originally opened as the “Queensland Performing Arts Complex”, after years of resisting the popular mis-naming of the building, it was officially changed to the “Queensland Performing Arts Centre” and all signage was altered to match.

Opening with only 3 stages, the Lyric Theatre, the Concert Hall and the Cremorne Theatre, the Centre was designed with expansion in mind. In 1998 the Playhouse was opened, ending the original extension plans. A fifth and likely final Theatre (seating 1500-1700) was announced in late May 2018 with a budget of $125 million. Completion is aimed for 2022. Currently tenders are being sought for its design.[2]

In 2017, QPAC hosted more than 1.3 million visitors to more than 1,200 performances, given the city population of Brisbane at 2.4 million, with the South East Queensland area's population sitting at 3.5 million and the entire State of Queensland at 5 million.

Programming

Each year QPAC hosts over 1,200 performances across its four theatres and outdoor spaces. The centre's versatile venues accommodate a wide variety of performance including dance, musicals, theatre, opera, comedy and contemporary and classical music concerts featuring leading Queensland, Australian and international actors, dancers, musicians, artists and companies. In addition, QPAC co-produces and invests in some of Australia's most innovative and successful shows and free outdoor programs.

In recent years, QPAC has presented some of the world's leading artists and companies in the QPAC International Series[3] including Paris Opera Ballet in 2020, Bolshoi Ballet in 2019, La Scala Theatre Ballet in 2018, The Royal Ballet in 2017, Bolshoi Ballet in 2013, Hamburg Ballet, Hamburg State Opera and Hamburg Philharmonic in 2012 and American Ballet Theatre in 2014.

QPAC produces the Out of the Box Festival for children 8 years and under,[4] and Clancestry program,[5] as part of the QPAC First Nations Program[6] which recognises the significant role First Nations Peoples have contributed and continue to contribute to Queensland’s historical, creative and cultural landscapes.

QPAC is the performance home for Queensland's leading performing arts companies – Queensland Ballet, Queensland Theatre Company, Opera Queensland, Queensland Youth Orchestras and Queensland Symphony Orchestra. In addition, QPAC regularly hosts many of Australia's leading performing arts companies including The Australian Ballet, Sydney Dance Company, Australian Chamber Orchestra and Bangarra Dance Theatre.

Performance spaces

QPAC Concert Hall
QPAC Concert Hall
Name Capacity Main performances
Lyric Theatre 2,000
  • Musical
  • Opera
  • Ballet
Concert Hall 1,600–1,800
  • Orchestra
  • Concert
Playhouse 850
  • Theatre
  • Ballet
Cremorne Theatre 277
  • Theatre
  • Comedy
  • Cabaret
New Performing Arts Venue Hall

(Under Construction)

1,500
  • Musical
  • Opera
  • Ballet

In May 2018, the Queensland Government and QPAC announced funding had been secured for The New Performing Arts Venue to be located on the Playhouse Green, adjacent to the current complex.[11] The new theatre is projected to be completed by late 2022, and will seat a minimum of 1,500 patrons.[12]

Associated organisations

Groups with programs at QPAC include:

References

  1. ^ "Obituary: Clyde Ian Barclay". The Courier-Mail. 10 October 2011. Retrieved 19 June 2022.
  2. ^ Crockford, Toby (27 May 2018). "New $150m theatre to help 'bursting at the seams' QPAC host world premieres". Brisbane Times. Archived from the original on 15 June 2018. Retrieved 8 August 2018.
  3. ^ "QPAC International Series". Archived from the original on 7 March 2020. Retrieved 10 March 2020.
  4. ^ "Out of the Box Festival". www.outoftheboxfestival.com.au. Archived from the original on 29 February 2016. Retrieved 28 March 2016.
  5. ^ [1]))
  6. ^ "QPAC Firsts Nations Program". Archived from the original on 8 March 2020. Retrieved 10 March 2020.
  7. ^ Description with photos of the Lyric Theatre on the company's website Archived 19 December 2010 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved 7 November 2010
  8. ^ Description with photos of the Concert Hall on the company's website Archived 23 December 2010 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved 7 November 2010
  9. ^ Description with photos of the Playhouse on the company's website Archived 19 October 2010 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved 7 November 2010
  10. ^ Description with photos of the Cremorne Theatre on the company's website Archived 17 October 2010 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved 7 November 2010
  11. ^ "Building a new state of the art theatre for Queensland". Arts Queensland. Archived from the original on 6 March 2019. Retrieved 20 April 2019.
  12. ^ "New Performing Arts Venue | QPAC". www.qpac.com.au. Archived from the original on 29 March 2019. Retrieved 20 April 2019.
  13. ^ Description of the Choir on the company's website Archived 21 December 2009 at the Wayback Machine Retrieved 7 November 2010