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A mountain ridge in Japan
A mountain ridge in Japan
A stratigraphic ridge within the Appalachian Mountains.
A stratigraphic ridge within the Appalachian Mountains.
The edges of tuyas can form ridges.
The edges of tuyas can form ridges.
Pirin Mountain main ridge – view from Koncheto knife-edge ridge towards the pyramidal peaks Vihren and Kutelo
Pirin Mountain main ridge – view from Koncheto knife-edge ridge towards the pyramidal peaks Vihren and Kutelo

A ridge or a mountain ridge is a geographical feature consisting of a chain of mountains or hills that form a continuous elevated crest for an extended distance. The sides of the ridge slope away from the narrow top on either side. The lines along the crest formed by the highest points, with the terrain dropping down on either side, are called the ridgelines. Ridges are usually termed hills or mountains as well, depending on size.

Types

The Pyynikki Ridge in Tampere, Finland

There are several main types of ridges:

See also

References

  1. ^ "How Volcanoes Work - lava flow features". www.geology.sdsu.edu. Retrieved 2019-01-13.
  2. ^ "Capitol Reef National Park – Geology". Capitol Reef National Park web site. U.S. National Park Service. 2007. Retrieved January 17, 2009.
  3. ^ Van Cott, John W. (1990). Utah place names : a comprehensive guide to the origins of geographic names : a compilation. Salt Lake City, Utah: University of Utah Press. p. 65. ISBN 9780874803457. Retrieved 2 June 2022.