Scholastic Corporation
FormerlyScholastic Inc. (1981–2011)
Company typePublic
NasdaqSCHL
S&P 600 Component
IndustryChildren's literacy and education
FoundedOctober 22, 1920; 103 years ago (1920-10-22), in Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania, U.S.
FounderMaurice Robinson
HeadquartersScholastic Building
557 Broadway, New York City, New York 10012,
United States
Key people
ProductsBooks, magazines, pre-K to grade 12 instructional programs, classroom magazines, films, television
RevenueIncrease US$1.7 billion (2022)[1]
Number of employees
8,900 (2019)[2]
DivisionsImprints and corporate divisions
Websitewww.scholastic.com/home Edit this at Wikidata

Scholastic Corporation is an American multinational publishing, education, and media company that publishes and distributes books, comics, and educational materials for schools, teachers, parents, children, and other educational institutions. Products are distributed via retail and online sales and through schools via reading clubs and book fairs. Clifford the Big Red Dog, a character created by Norman Bridwell in 1963, is the mascot of the company.

Company history

Richard Robinson served as the corporation's CEO and president from 1975 until his death in 2021

Scholastic was founded in 1920 by Maurice R. Robinson near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to be a publisher of youth magazines. The first publication was The Western Pennsylvania Scholastic. It covered high school sports and social activities; the four-page magazine debuted on October 22, 1920, and was distributed in 50 high schools.[3] In the 1940s, Scholastic entered the book club business. In the 1960s, scholastic international publishing locations were added in England 1964, New Zealand 1964, and Sydney 1968.[4] Also in the 1960s, Scholastic entered the book publishing business. In the 1970s, Scholastic created its TV entertainment division.[3] From 1975 until his death in 2021, Richard Robinson, who was the son of the corporation's founder, served as CEO and president.[5] In 2000, Scholastic purchased Grolier for US$400 million.[6][7] Scholastic became involved in a video collection in 2001. In February 2012, Scholastic bought Weekly Reader Publishing from Reader's Digest Association, and announced in July 2012 that it planned to discontinue separate issues of Weekly Reader magazines after more than a century of publication, and co-branded the magazines as Scholastic News/Weekly Reader.[8] Scholastic sold READ 180 to Houghton Mifflin Harcourt in 2015. in December 2015, Scholastic launched the Scholastic Reads Podcasts. On October 22, 2020, Scholastic celebrated its 100th anniversary. In 2005, Scholastic developed FASTT Math with Tom Snyder to help students with their proficiency with math skills, specifically being multiplication, division, addition, and subtraction through a series of games and memorization quizzes gauging the student's progress.[9] In 2013, Scholastic developed System 44 with Houghton Mifflin Harcourt to help students encourage reading skills. In 2011, Scholastic developed READ 180 with Houghton Mifflin Harcourt to help students understand their reading skills. Scholastic Reference publishes reference books.[10]

Company structure

The business has three segments: Children's Book Publishing and Distribution, Education Solutions, and International. Scholastic holds the perpetual US publishing rights to the Harry Potter and Hunger Games book series.[11][12] Scholastic is the world's largest publisher and distributor of children's books and print and digital educational materials for pre-K to grade 12.[13] In addition to Harry Potter and The Hunger Games, Scholastic is known for its school book clubs and book fairs, classroom magazines such as Scholastic News and Science World, and popular book series: Clifford the Big Red Dog, Goosebumps, Horrible Histories, Captain Underpants, Animorphs, The Baby-Sitters Club, and I Spy. Scholastic also publishes instructional reading and writing programs, and offers professional learning and consultancy services for school improvement. Clifford the Big Red Dog serves as the official mascot of Scholastic.[14]

Marketing initiatives

The Scholastic Art & Writing awards was Founded in 1923 by Maurice R. Robinson, The Scholastic Art & Writing Awards,[15] administered by the Alliance for Young Artists & Writers, is a competition which recognizes talented young artists and writers from across the United States.[16]

The success and enduring legacy of the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards can be attributed in part to its well-planned and executed marketing initiatives. These efforts have allowed the competition to adapt to the changing times, connect with a wider audience, and continue its mission of nurturing the creative potential of the nation's youth.

Imprints and corporate divisions

"Omnibus Books" redirects here. For the independent publisher, see Omnibus Press.

In 2005, Scholastic developed FASTT Math with Tom Snyder to help students with their proficiency with math skills, specifically being multiplication, division, addition, and subtraction through a series of games and memorization quizzes gauging the student's progress.[24] In 2013, Scholastic developed System 44 with Houghton Mifflin Harcourt to help students encourage reading skills. In 2011, Scholastic developed READ 180 with Houghton Mifflin Harcourt to help students understand their reading skills. Scholastic Reference publishes reference books.[25][26]

Scholastic Entertainment

Scholastic Entertainment (formerly Scholastic Productions and Scholastic Media) is a corporate division[27] led by Deborah Forte since 1995. It covers "all forms of media and consumer products, and is comprised of four main groups – Productions, Marketing & Consumer Products, Interactive, and Audio." Weston Woods is its production studio, acquired in 1996, as was Soup2Nuts (best known for Dr. Katz, Professional Therapist, Science Court and Home Movies) from 2001 to 2015 before shutting down.[28] Scholastic has produced audiobooks such as the Caldecott/Newbery Collection;[29] Scholastic has been involved with several television programs and feature films based on its books. In 1985, Scholastic Productions teamed up with Karl-Lorimar Home Video, a home video unit of Lorimar Productions, to form the line Scholastic-Lorimar Home Video, whereas Scholastic would produce made-for-video programming, and became a best-selling video line for kids, and the pact expired for two years, whereas Scholastic would team up with leading independent family video distributor and a label of International Video Entertainment, Family Home Entertainment, to distribute made-for-video programming for the next three years.[30]

Filmography

Series

Title Year(s) Network Co-production with
Voyagers! 1982–1983 NBC James D. Parriott Productions and Universal Television (owner)
Charles in Charge 1984–1985
1987–1990
CBS
Syndication
Al Burton Productions and Universal Television (owner)
Scholastic's Blue Ribbon Storybook Video 1986 Direct-to-video Nelvana and Karl-Lorimar Home Video (owner)
Clifford the Big Red Dog 1988 Nelvana
My Secret Identity 1988–1991 CTV (Canada)
Syndication (U.S.)
Sunrise Films (owner), MCA TV
Parent Survival Guide 1989 Lifetime
The Baby-Sitters Club 1990–1993 Direct-to-video
HBO
Amber Films, Ltd.
The Magic School Bus 1994–1997 PBS Kids Nelvana, South Carolina ETV
Goosebumps 1995–1998 Fox Kids Protocol Entertainment
Animorphs 1998–1999 Nickelodeon (U.S.)
YTV/Global (Canada)
Protocol Entertainment
Dear America 1999–2000 HBO Family
Clifford the Big Red Dog 2000–2003 PBS Kids Mike Young Productions
Horrible Histories 2000–2001 CITV Mike Young Productions and Telegael
I Spy 2002–2003 HBO Family The Ink Tank (season 1) and JWL Entertainment Productions (season 2)
Clifford's Puppy Days 2003–2006 PBS Kids Mike Young Productions (season 1)
Maya & Miguel 2004–2007 PBS Kids Go!
The Amazing Colossal Adventures of WordGirl (interstitial series) 2006–2007 PBS Kids Soup2Nuts
WordGirl 2007–2015 Soup2Nuts
Turbo Dogs 2008–2011 Kids' CBC (Canada)
Qubo (U.S.)
Smiley Guy Studios, Huhu Studios, CCI Entertainment (owner)
Sammy's Story Shop 2008–2009 Qubo
Astroblast! 2014–2015 PBS Kids Sprout Soup2Nuts
The Magic School Bus Rides Again 2017–2021 Netflix 9 Story Media Group and Brown Bag Films
His Dark Materials 2019–2022 BBC One
HBO
BBC Studios, Bad Wolf (owner), New Line Productions
Clifford the Big Red Dog 2019–2021 Prime Video
PBS Kids
9 Story Media Group, Brown Bag Films and 100 Chickens
Stillwater 2020–2023 Apple TV+ Gaumont Animation
Puppy Place 2021–2022
Eva the Owlet 2023 Brown Bag Films
Goosebumps 2023–present Disney+/Hulu Original Film, Stoller Global Solutions and Sony Pictures Television (owner)

Specials

Title Airdate Network Notes
Mystery at Fire Island November 27, 1981 CBS
The Haunted Mansion Mystery January 8-15, 1983 ABC
The Magic of Herself the Elf July 30, 1983 Syndication Nelvana, Those Characters from Cleveland (owner)
The Great Love Experiment February 8, 1984 ABC
A Different Twist March 10, 1984 ABC
The Almost Royal Family October 24, 1984 ABC
The Exchange Student January 22, 1985 CBS
The Adventures of a Two-Minute Werewolf February 23-March 2, 1985 ABC
High School Narc December 4, 1985 ABC
Getting Even: A Wimp's Revenge March 19, 1986 ABC
The Incredible Ida Early May 29, 1987 NBC
Read Between the Lines June 3, 1987 ABC
Song City USA
More Song City USA
September 1989 Direct-to-video
Floor Time: Tuning In to Each Child 1990 Direct-to-video
Riding the Magic School Bus with Joanna Cole and Bruce Degen September 1992 Direct-to-video
The Very Hungry Caterpillar and Other Stories 1993 Direct-to-video U.S. version of The World of Eric Carle
Stellaluna 2002 Direct-to-video

Films

Release date Title Notes
July 14, 1995 The Indian in the Cupboard co-production with Paramount Pictures, Columbia Pictures, and The Kennedy/Marshall Company
August 18, 1995 The Baby-Sitters Club co-production with Columbia Pictures and Beacon Pictures
October 9, 1998 The Mighty co-production with Miramax Films
October 11, 2002 Tuck Everlasting co-production with Walt Disney Pictures and Beacon Pictures
February 20, 2004 Clifford's Really Big Movie co-production with Warner Bros. Pictures and Big Red Dog Productions
December 5, 2007 The Golden Compass co-production with New Line Cinema and Ingenious Film Partners
October 16, 2015 Goosebumps co-production with Columbia Pictures, Sony Pictures Animation, LStar Capital, Village Roadshow Pictures, and Original Film
October 12, 2018 Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween co-production with Columbia Pictures, Sony Pictures Animation, Original Film, and Silvertongue Films
December 6, 2018 Mortal Engines co-production with Universal Pictures, MRC, Silvertongue Films, Perfect World Pictures, and WingNut Films
April 4, 2020 You're Bacon Me Crazy television movie; co-production with Bar None Productions
November 10, 2021 Clifford the Big Red Dog co-production with Paramount Pictures, Entertainment One, New Republic Pictures, and The Kerner Entertainment Company
May 17, 2024 Thelma the Unicorn co-production with Netflix Animation
Upcoming
August 2, 2024 Harold and the Purple Crayon co-production with Columbia Pictures, and Davis Entertainment

Book fairs

Scholastic Book Fairs began in 1981. Scholastic provides book fair products to schools, which then conduct the book fairs. Schools can elect to receive books, supplies and equipment or a portion of the proceeds from the book fair.[31]

In the United States, during fiscal 2023, revenue from the book fairs channel ($553.1 millions) accounted for half of the company's revenue in the "Total Children's Book Publishing and Distribution" segment ($1,038 millions),[32] and schools earned over $210 million in proceeds in cash and incentive program credits.[33]

In October 2023, Scholastic created a separate category for books dealing with "race, LGBTQ and other issues related to diversity", allowing schools to opt out of carrying these types of books. Scholastic defended the move, citing legislation in multiple states seeking to ban books dealing with LGBTQ issues or race.[34] After public backlash from educators, authors, and free speech advocacy groups, Scholastic reversed course, saying the new category will be discontinued, writing: "It is unsettling that the current divisive landscape in the U.S. is creating an environment that could deny any child access to books, or that teachers could be penalized for creating access to all stories for their students".[35][36]

Book clubs

Scholastic book clubs are offered at schools in many countries. Typically, teachers administer the program to the students in their own classes, but in some cases, the program is administered by a central contact for the entire school. Within Scholastic, Reading Clubs is a separate unit (compared to, e.g., Education). Reading clubs are arranged by age/grade.[37] Book club operators receive "Classroom Funds" redeemable only for Scholastic Corporation products.[38][39][40]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Scholastic Form 10-K Annual Report". Scholastic Corporation. Archived from the original on April 18, 2017. Retrieved April 17, 2017.
  2. ^ "Annual Report 2019" (PDF). Archived from the original on February 28, 2020. Retrieved February 28, 2020.
  3. ^ a b Neary, Lynn (July 15, 2013). "How Scholastic Sells Literacy to Generations Of New Readers". NPR. Archived from the original on May 4, 2021. Retrieved May 4, 2021.
  4. ^ "United States Securities and Exchange Commission Form 10-K Annual Report pursuant to section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities exchange Act of 1934, For the fiscal year ended May 31, 2002, Commission File No. 0-19860: Scholastic Corporation". 2002. pp. 6, 7. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved September 12, 2015.
  5. ^ "Richard Robinson". Scholastic.com. Archived from the original on June 7, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  6. ^ "French Plan to Sell Grolier", Publishers Weekly, 11/29/1999
  7. ^ "Scholastic to Acquire Grolier", press release, Scholastic Inc., 4/13/2000.
  8. ^ "Scholastic to End Independent Publication of Weekly Reader". Bloomberg. July 23, 2012. Archived from the original on July 31, 2012. Retrieved November 16, 2012.
  9. ^ Grodd, Wolfgang. ABSTRACT MATHEMATICAL COGNITION EDITED BY : Philippe Chassy and Wolfgang Grodd PUBLISHED IN : Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.
  10. ^ "READ 180: Evidence and Efficacy for Students with Disabilities and English Learners". www.hmhco.com. Retrieved March 8, 2024.
  11. ^ "Scholastic profit rises on Hunger Games sales". Reuters. July 19, 2012. Archived from the original on March 6, 2016. Retrieved October 18, 2012.
  12. ^ Reaney, Patricia (July 31, 2012). "J.K. Rowling launches Harry Potter book club online". Reuters. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved October 18, 2012.
  13. ^ "Global Publishing Leaders 2018: Scholastic". Publishers Weekly. Archived from the original on November 6, 2019. Retrieved November 6, 2019.
  14. ^ Croot, James (December 29, 2021). "Clifford the Big Red Dog: Doggone it - this predictable canine caper disappoints". Stuff. Retrieved January 8, 2023.
  15. ^ Williams, John (September 20, 2017). "Richard Robinson of Scholastic Honored for Lifetime of Work in Children's Publishing". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on June 7, 2021. Retrieved March 30, 2021.
  16. ^ "Scholastic Art and Writing Awards Baltimore Office of Promotion & the Arts". www.promotionandarts.org. Archived from the original on October 15, 2019. Retrieved July 8, 2021.
  17. ^ "Welcome To Arthur A. Levine Books!". Arthur A. Levine Books!. Archived from the original on January 9, 2016. Retrieved January 3, 2016.
  18. ^ "Potter Publisher Predicted Literary Magic". NPR. Archived from the original on May 31, 2018. Retrieved April 5, 2018.
  19. ^ "The Wizardly Editor Who Caught the Golden Snitch". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on May 31, 2018. Retrieved December 19, 2017.
  20. ^ Whyte, Alexandra (March 13, 2019). "Harry Potter publisher leaves Scholastic". Kidscreen. Archived from the original on May 15, 2019. Retrieved July 20, 2019.
  21. ^ "Graphix".
  22. ^ "Publishing Channel". www.scholastic.com.au. Scholastic Australia. Archived from the original on June 25, 2015. Retrieved September 12, 2015.
  23. ^ "Children's Press". Archived from the original on June 17, 2017. Retrieved July 16, 2022.
  24. ^ "Tom Snyder Products Announces FASTT Math". PR Newswire. April 7, 2005. ProQuest 451492696.
  25. ^ Hobbs, Nancy (December 27, 1996). "Under The Covers; Reviews Of Children's Books". The Salt Lake Tribune. Archived from the original on March 13, 2023. Retrieved March 13, 2023.
  26. ^ Bookman, Julie (September 11, 1999). "Books for Kids: 'Wow' facts give young historians frame of reference - Family Pages". The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Archived from the original on March 13, 2023.
  27. ^ "Welcome". About Scholastic. Scholastic Corporation. Archived from the original on April 11, 2012. Retrieved April 20, 2012.
  28. ^ "Media & The Mission". About Scholastic. Scholastic Corporation. Archived from the original on April 20, 2012. Retrieved April 20, 2012.
  29. ^ "Weston Woods Caldecott/Newbery Collection". English language teaching: listening practice. Scholastic Corporation. Archived from the original on April 23, 2012. Retrieved April 20, 2012.
  30. ^ "Kidvid Forces Link To Attack Market". Variety. August 19, 1987. p. 47.
  31. ^ "2023 Annual Report, page 9". investor.scholastic.com. Retrieved October 6, 2023.
  32. ^ "2023 Annual Report, page 56". investor.scholastic.com. Retrieved October 6, 2023.
  33. ^ "2023 Annual Report, page 13". investor.scholastic.com. Retrieved October 6, 2023.
  34. ^ Picchi, Aimee (October 17, 2023). "Scholastic book fairs, a staple at U.S. schools, accused of excluding diverse books". CBS News. Retrieved December 18, 2023.
  35. ^ Treisman, Rachel (October 25, 2023). "Scholastic backtracks, saying it will stop separating diverse books for fairs in 2024". NPR. Retrieved December 18, 2023.
  36. ^ Horton, Adrian (October 25, 2023). "Scholastic reverses decision to separate books on race, gender and sexuality". The Guardian. Retrieved December 18, 2023.
  37. ^ "Our Businesses". scholastic.com. Archived from the original on June 7, 2021. Retrieved June 10, 2021.
  38. ^ "Terms & Services". scholastic.com. Archived from the original on April 4, 2021. Retrieved June 10, 2021.
  39. ^ "Raise Classroom Funds". scholastic.com. Archived from the original on April 28, 2021. Retrieved June 10, 2021.
  40. ^ "FAQ: Raising Money for Your Classroom". Scholastic Corporation. Salesforce. Archived from the original on June 10, 2021. Retrieved June 10, 2021. Where can classroom funds be spent? Classroom Funds can be spent online only at Scholastic Book Clubs (clubs.scholastic.com)