Supreme Court of Brunei Darussalam
Supreme Court Building
Map
4°53′27″N 114°56′06″E / 4.8907136°N 114.9349087°E / 4.8907136; 114.9349087
Established1963; 61 years ago (1963)
Coordinates4°53′27″N 114°56′06″E / 4.8907136°N 114.9349087°E / 4.8907136; 114.9349087
Authorized byConstitution of Brunei
Websitejudiciary.gov.bn
Chief Justice of Brunei
CurrentlySteven Chong Wan Oon
Since30 June 2018

The Supreme Court of Brunei Darussalam is the highest court of Brunei Darussalam, though its decisions are subject to appeal in civil cases to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council.[1] The Chief Justice and other Judges of the Supreme Court are appointed by the Sultan of Brunei to sit in judgment of the most acrimonious contentions in the country.[2]

Supreme Court Building

The Supreme Court of Sarawak, North Borneo, and Brunei was replaced by the Supreme Court of Brunei Darussalam in 1963. The High Court and Court of Appeal that make up the new Supreme Court have the same authority as the previous Supreme Court. The Supreme Court Building has had several locations since it was founded, including Kuala Belait. Both the former Secretariat Building and the old Lapau Building were partially occupied by it.[3]

The new Supreme Court Building was the subject of an architectural competition that the government held in 1978. Sungai Kedayan to the east and Jalan Tutong to the north border the building's chosen location. The building's construction started in February 1981 and was finished in 1983. The structure cost B$20 million to construct and has a 96,500 square foot floor space. The Supreme Court Building's ribbon-cutting event took place on 15 March 1984.[3]

Judges

Judges of the Supreme Court of Hong Kong were granted permission by the government of Hong Kong to serve as Judges of the Supreme Court of Brunei Darussalam. It was standard procedure to appoint Supreme Court of Hong Kong judges as Judicial Commissioners of the Supreme Court of Brunei Darussalam for a three-year term. In 1993, this long-standing legal agreement with Hong Kong came to an end. When it comes to filling vacancies on the Brunei Supreme Court, Brunei have still continued to use the services of former Hong Kong justices.[4]

The Chief Justice of Hong Kong would frequently be named as the Chief Justice of Brunei Darussalam. Although Sir Denys Tudor Emil Roberts, the previous Chief Justice of Hong Kong, retired from his position as Chief Justice of Hong Kong with effect from 15 March 1988, he continued to serve as Chief Justice of Brunei Darussalam. On 24 May 1988, Yang Ti-liang, the Chief Justice of Hong Kong, was chosen to lead the Court of Appeals. Until May 16th, 1993, he served as the Court of Appeals' President. Kutlu Tekin Fuad, a retired judge from the Hong Kong Court of Appeal, was chosen to lead the Court of Appeal on 17 May.[4]

Chief justices

Portrait Minister Term start Term end Time in office Ref.
Geoffrey Gould Briggs 1963 18 June 1979 16 years, 168 days [5][6]
Denys Tudor Emil Roberts 18 June 1979 1 August 2001 22 years, 44 days [4][7]
Mohammad Saied 1 August 2001 4 August 2009 8 years, 3 days [8]
Kifrawi Kifli 4 August 2009 30 June 2018 8 years, 330 days [9]
Steven Chong Wan Oon 30 June 2018 Incumbent 5 years, 196 days [10]

References

  1. ^ Court, The Supreme. "Role of the JCPC - Judicial Committee of the Privy Council (JCPC)". www.jcpc.uk. Retrieved 2022-08-02.
  2. ^ "OVERVIEW OF BRUNEI LEGAL SYSTEM". Council of ASEAN Chief Justices.
  3. ^ a b "History of the Supreme Court Building – CACJ". Retrieved 2022-12-31.
  4. ^ a b c "archive.ph". archive.ph. Retrieved 2022-12-31.
  5. ^ "Briggs, Sir Geoffrey (Gould)". Who's Who. doi:10.1093/ww/9780199540884.013.U171329.
  6. ^ Inc, IBP (2017-12-24). Brunei Political, Constitutional System and Procedures Handbook - Strategic Information and Regulations. Lulu.com. p. 214. ISBN 978-1-5145-1648-5. ((cite book)): |last= has generic name (help)
  7. ^ Supreme Court of Brunei Darussalam (c. 2000). "Rules to The Supreme Court (Amendment) (No. 3) Rules, 2000" (PDF). Retrieved 11 March 2022.
  8. ^ USA, IBP (2009-03-20). Brunei Country Guide Volume 1 Strategic Information and Developments. Lulu.com. p. 128. ISBN 978-1-4387-0630-6.
  9. ^ "Sultanate - News | Negara Brunei Darussalam | Sultan appoints first Bruneian Chief Justice". www.sultanate.com. Retrieved 2022-12-31.
  10. ^ Bandial, Ain (2018-06-29). "Dato Steven Chong named chief justice of Supreme Court". The Scoop. Retrieved 2022-12-31.