Trabeculae carneae
Details
Identifiers
Latintrabeculae carneae cordis
TA98A12.1.00.020
A12.1.02.021
A12.1.04.011
TA24049, 4071, 4024, 4056
FMA76525
Anatomical terminology

The trabeculae carneae (columnae carneae or meaty ridges) are rounded or irregular muscular columns which project from the inner surface of the right and left ventricle of the heart.[1] These are different from the pectinate muscles, which are present in the atria of the heart. In development, trabeculae carneae are among the first of the cardiac structures to develop in the embryonic cardiac tube. Further, throughout development some trabeculae carneae condense to form the myocardium, papillary muscles, chordae tendineae, and septum.[2]

Types

There are two kinds:

Function

Trabeculae lie at the interface between intracardiac flow and the compact myocardium. Their fractal branching pattern helps to maintain cardiac performance in both healthy and failing hearts by increasing contractility and stroke work.[3] Trabecular morphology is also important to intraventricular conduction, suggesting these complex structures are involved in cardiac electrophysiology as well as mechanical function.[4] A condensation of trabecular fibres forms the moderator band which carries the right branch of the bundle of His.

The trabeculae carneae also serve a function similar to that of papillary muscles in that their contraction pulls on the chordae tendineae, preventing inversion of the mitral (bicuspid) and tricuspid valves towards the atrial chambers, which would lead to subsequent leakage of the blood back into the atria. By this action on the atrioventricular valves, backflow of the blood from the ventricles into the atria is prevented.

The trabeculae carneae and the papillary muscles make up a significant percentage of the ventricular mass in the heart (12-17% in normal human adult hearts), and are correlated with ventricular end diastolic volume.[5] Trabeculae ratios of capillary-to myocyte differ between the walls of the right and left ventricle. In the left ventricle, each capillary delivers oxygen to one myocyte. However, in the right ventricle the capillary-to myocyte ratio is 0.8 because the right ventricle tissues have a lower oxygen consumption due to a weaker afterload.[6]

See also

References

Public domain This article incorporates text in the public domain from page 532 of the 20th edition of Gray's Anatomy (1918)

  1. ^ Moore, K.L., & Agur, A.M. (2007). Essential Clinical Anatomy: Third Edition. Baltimore: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. 90-94. ISBN 978-0-7817-6274-8
  2. ^ Fatemifar, Fatemeh; Feldman, Marc; Oglesby, Meagan; Han, Hai-Chao (February 2019). "Comparison of Biomechanical Properties and Microstructure of Trabeculae Carneae, Papillary Muscles, and Myocardium in the Human Heart". Journal of Biomechanical Engineering. 141 (2): 0210071–02100710. doi:10.1115/1.4041966. PMC 6298537. PMID 30418486. Retrieved 16 November 2022.
  3. ^ Meyer HV, Dawes TJW, Serrani M, Bai W, Tokarczuk P, Cai J; et al. (2020). "Genetic and functional insights into the fractal structure of the heart". Nature. 584 (7822): 589–594. Bibcode:2020Natur.584..589M. doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2635-8. PMC 7116759. PMID 32814899.((cite journal)): CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  4. ^ Olejníčková V, Šaňková B, Sedmera D, Janáček J (2018). "Trabecular Architecture Determines Impulse Propagation Through the Early Embryonic Mouse Heart". Front Physiol. 9: 1876. doi:10.3389/fphys.2018.01876. PMC 6331446. PMID 30670981.((cite journal)): CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  5. ^ Fatemifar, Fatemeh; Feldman, Marc; Oglesby, Meagan; Han, Hai-Chao (February 2019). "Comparison of Biomechanical Properties and Microstructure of Trabeculae Carneae, Papillary Muscles, and Myocardium in the Human Heart". Journal of Biomechanical Engineering. 141 (2): 0210071–02100710. doi:10.1115/1.4041966. PMC 6298537. PMID 30418486. Retrieved 16 November 2022.
  6. ^ Goo, Soyeon; Joshi, Purva; Sands, Greg; Gerneke, Dane; Taberner, Andrew; Dollie, Qaaism; LeGrice, Ian; Loiselle, Denis (2009). "Trabeculae carneae as models of the ventricular walls: implications for the delivery of oxygen". Journal of General Physiology. 134 (4): 339–350. doi:10.1085/jgp.200910276. PMC 2757768. PMID 19752188. Retrieved 16 November 2022.