Tsuen Wan Chinese Permanent Cemetery.
Tsuen Wan Chinese Permanent Cemetery.
Tsuen Wan Chinese Permanent Cemetery.
Tsuen Wan Chinese Permanent Cemetery.
Tsuen Wan Chinese Permanent Cemetery viewed across Rambler Channel.
Tsuen Wan Chinese Permanent Cemetery viewed across Rambler Channel.

Tsuen Wan Chinese Permanent Cemetery (Chinese: 荃灣華人永遠墳場) is a cemetery in Kwai Chung, Hong Kong located adjacent to the Kwai Chung Public Mortuary. It is managed by The Board of Management of the Chinese Permanent Cemeteries (Chinese: 華人永遠墳場管理委員會).[1] It is the second Chinese permanent cemetery in Hong Kong after Aberdeen Chinese Permanent Cemetery and it lies on the slopes between Riviera Gardens and Tsuen Wan Abattoir, facing Gin Drinkers Bay and Rambler Channel.

In terms of administrative divisions, Tsuen Wan District and Kwai Tsing District are bounded by Texaco Road and Tsing Tsuen Bridge. The cemetery is located to the south of the boundary line, so it belongs to Kwai Tsing District.

History

On 9 August 1935, the Hong Kong Government had approved the land in Tsuen Wan with an area of about 120,000 m2. It was opened on 19 June 1941 and is one of the four Chinese Permanent Cemeteries in Hong Kong.[2]

In order to provide more niches to meet demand, the two columbariums in the cemetery were completed in 1974 and 1987 respectively and the expansion of the first columbarium was completed in 2015, in order to cope with the popularity of cremation niches to bring in high demand.[2]

Notable burials

See also

References

  1. ^ Location of Burial. Centre on Behavioral Health (CBH) of the University of Hong Kong
  2. ^ a b "華人永遠墳場管理委員會–關於華永會–墳場典故–荃灣華人永遠墳場". The Board of Management of The Chinese Permanent Cemeteries. 2015. Retrieved 29 March 2021.
  3. ^ Singapore, National Library Board. "Eu Tong Sen | Infopedia". eresources.nlb.gov.sg. Retrieved 29 March 2021.
  4. ^ "Admiral Chan Chak - Escape from Hong Kong". Escape from Hong Kong. Retrieved 29 March 2021.
  5. ^ "殷商梁顯利出殯 安葬荃灣永遠墳塲 致祭者千餘人備極哀榮". 工商晚報 [The Kung Sheung Evening News] (in Chinese (Hong Kong)). Hong Kong. 19 January 1961. p. 4 – via HK Public Libraries MMIS.
  6. ^ "歐陽儉昨逝世生前曾向友好微露托孤之意死後故人情重多有慨助喪資". Ta Kung Pao (in Chinese (Hong Kong)). Hong Kong. 10 October 1961. p. 4 – via HK Public Libraries MMIS.
  7. ^ Bell, Murray (1 January 2004). "Alan Li Fook-sum | South China Morning Post". South China Morning Post. Retrieved 29 March 2021.

Coordinates: 22°21′33″N 114°06′59″E / 22.359168°N 114.11634°E / 22.359168; 114.11634