A sequence of still images has been stitched together to show the path taken by Takeshi Yasutoko doing an Alley-Oop Liu-Kang Flatspin 540
A sequence of still images has been stitched together to show the path taken by Takeshi Yasutoko doing an Alley-Oop Liu-Kang Flatspin 540

Vert skating or vertical skating is a discipline using skates like inline skates or roller skates on a vert ramp, a style of half-pipe. In vert skating, the skater is able to achieve more air-time as compared to other styles of skating, meaning skaters can perform complicated aerial maneuvers and acrobatic tricks, such as spins and flips.

The intent of vert skating is to ride higher than the coping (the metal pipe on top of the ramp) and perform spins or flips.[1] It focuses on complicated aerial maneuvers, such as spins and flips.[2] The intent of the skater is to build speed until they are of sufficient height above the edge of the ramp to perform various aerial acrobatics.[3] In competitions skaters have limited time, often less than a minute, to impress the judges by landing numerous and difficult tricks, having a good flow and consistency, having creativity with the routine and most importantly having a good style.[4]

The first X Games, in 1995, featured four inline skating events: best trick/big air, men's and women's vert, men's street, and men's downhill.[5] At its heyday in 1998, inline skating had the most events of any sport at the X Games, featuring vert triples (a three-person team based vert event), women's street, and women's downhill in addition to the original events.[6]

However, the sport soon fell out of fashion and by 2004, vert skating was the only remaining event at the X Games – including just one men's and women's combined contest.[7] For the 2005 X Games, aggressive inline was dropped entirely and the vert competition was replaced by women's skateboarding.[8]

Vert skating is considered a challenging sport: as of 2012 there are fewer than 15 professional vert skaters attending competitions.[citation needed]

X Games results

Men's vert

Year 1st place, gold medalist(s) 2nd place, silver medalist(s) 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
1995 Tom Fry (AUS) Cesar Mora (AUS) Manuel Billiris (AUS)
1996 Rene Hulgreen (DNK) Tom Fry (AUS) Chris Edwards (USA)
1997 Tim Ward (AUS) Taïg Khris (FRA) Chris Edwards (USA)
1998 Cesar Mora (AUS) Matt Salerno (AUS) Taïg Khris (FRA)
1999 Eito Yasutoko (JPN) Cesar Mora (AUS) Matt Salerno (AUS)
2000 Eito Yasutoko (JPN) Takeshi Yasutoko (JPN) Cesar Mora (AUS)
2001 Taïg Khris (FRA) Takeshi Yasutoko (JPN) Shane Yost (AUS)
2002 Takeshi Yasutoko (JPN) Eito Yasutoko (JPN) Marc Englehart (USA)
2003 Eito Yasutoko (JPN) Takeshi Yasutoko (JPN) Record not available

Sources:[6][9][10][11]

Women's vert

Year 1st place, gold medalist(s) 2nd place, silver medalist(s) 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
1995 Tash Hodgeson (NZL) Angie Walton (USA) Laura Connery (USA)
1996 Fabiola da Silva (BRA) Jodie Tyler (AUS) Tash Hodgeson (NZL)
1997 Fabiola da Silva (BRA) Claudia Trachsel Ayumi Kawasaki (JPN)
1998 Fabiola da Silva (BRA) Ayumi Kawasaki (JPN) Maki Komori (JPN)
1999 Ayumi Kawasaki (JPN) Fabiola da Silva (BRA) Maki Komori (JPN)
2000 Fabiola da Silva (BRA) Ayumi Kawasaki (JPN) Merce Borrull (ESP)
2001 Fabiola da Silva (BRA) Ayumi Kawasaki (JPN) Record not available
2002 Records not available
2003 Records not available

Sources:[6][12][13][14][15][16]

Vert triples

Vert triples was a mixed-gender team AIL vert event and was included at two X Games, 1998 in San Diego and 1999 in San Francisco. Fabiola da Silva and Ayumi Kawasaki competed on a triples team with Andre Englehart in 1999. Maki Komori is the only woman to have medaled in vert triples at the X Games, winning bronze as part of a team with the Yasutoko brothers, Takeshi and Eito, in 1999.

Year 1st place, gold medalist(s) 2nd place, silver medalist(s) 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
1998
  • Paul Malina (AUS)
  • Sam Fogarty (AUS)
  • Viorel Popa (USA)
  • Cesar Mora (AUS)
  • Mike Budnik (USA)
  • Matt Salerno (AUS)
1999
  • Taïg Khris (FRA)
  • Javier Bujanda (ESP)
  • Sven Boekhorst (NLD)
  • Cesar Mora (AUS)
  • Mike Budnik (USA)
  • Matt Salerno (AUS)
  • Takeshi Yasutoko (JPN)
  • Eito Yasutoko (JPN)
  • Maki Komori (JPN)

Sources:[6][9][15][17][18][19]

Vert

Men's and women's vert were combined at the 2004 X Games in Los Angeles. Fabiola da Silva was the only woman to qualify for participation in the event and placed sixth in the finals.

Year 1st place, gold medalist(s) 2nd place, silver medalist(s) 3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
2004 Takeshi Yasutoko (JPN) Record not available Eito Yasutoko (JPN)

Sources:[9][10]

Other notable vert skaters

Main category: Vert skaters

Skaters who participated in vert events at the X Games but did not medal or who participated at other major international events include:

See also

References

  1. ^ "Vert Skating". Aggressive Skaters Association. Archived from the original on 26 October 2012. Retrieved 13 November 2012.
  2. ^ Williams, Carlesa. "What is vertical aggressive inline skating". liveabout.com. Retrieved 15 November 2012.
  3. ^ "Aggressive Skating". Inline Planet. Retrieved 13 November 2012.
  4. ^ "Yasutoko's new trick blows away competition". Kia X Games Asia. 1 May 2011. Archived from the original on 21 September 2011. Retrieved 13 November 2012.
  5. ^ Condor, Bob (20 June 1996). "Are these the next Olympians?". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 14 December 2020.
  6. ^ a b c d "Summer X Games almanac (1995–1998)". ESPN. 15 August 2000. Retrieved 14 December 2020.
  7. ^ "The Death (and return?) of Aggressive Inline". Rad Rat Video. 25 August 2016. Retrieved 14 December 2020.
  8. ^ "Inline No Longer X Games Competition". ESPN. 8 March 2005. Retrieved 14 December 2020.
  9. ^ a b c "Eito Yasutoko". EXPN.com. 2004. Archived from the original on 9 October 2007. Retrieved 14 December 2020.
  10. ^ a b "Takeshi Yasutoko's official X Games athlete biography". X Games. Retrieved 14 December 2020.
  11. ^ "Shane Yost's official X Games athlete biography". X Games. Retrieved 14 December 2020.
  12. ^ "Fabiola da Silva's official X Games athlete biography". X Games. Retrieved 14 December 2020.
  13. ^ "Photos > X Games 2000 > Women's Vert". ESPNEventMedia.com. 30 July 2010. Archived from the original on 30 July 2010. Retrieved 14 December 2020.
  14. ^ "Ayumi Kayaki's official X Games athlete biography". X Games. Retrieved 14 December 2020.
  15. ^ a b "1999 Summer X Games results". ESPN. Archived from the original on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 15 December 2020.
  16. ^ "Merce Borrull's official X Games athlete biography". X Games. Retrieved 15 December 2020.
  17. ^ "Matt Salerno's official X Games athlete biography". X Games. Retrieved 14 December 2020.
  18. ^ "Sven Boekhorst's official X Games athlete biography". X Games. Retrieved 14 December 2020.
  19. ^ "TAIG KHRIS". The Invisible Inliner. 29 October 2006. Retrieved 14 December 2020.
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  25. ^ Garrett, Chris (1994). "Mike Giancinti". Daily Bread. 3: 24–25. Retrieved 15 December 2020 – via Issuu.
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  33. ^ "Paul Malina's official X Games athlete biography". X Games. Retrieved 15 December 2020.
  34. ^ "Randy Marino's official X Games athlete biography". X Games. Retrieved 15 December 2020.
  35. ^ "Elmer Pillon's official X Games athlete biography". X Games. Retrieved 15 December 2020.
  36. ^ "Shawn Robertson's official X Games athlete biography". X Games. Retrieved 15 December 2020.
  37. ^ "Vinicius Rosa's official X Games athlete biography". X Games. Retrieved 15 December 2020.
  38. ^ "1999 B3: Bikes, Boards & Blades: Aggressive In-line skating". ESPN. 3 August 1999. Retrieved 15 December 2020.
  39. ^ Weinstein, Brad (3 July 1999). "Da Silva an Inspiration on Wheels". SFGATE. Retrieved 15 December 2020.