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Xenon oxytetrafluoride
Ball-and-stick model of xenon oxytetrafluoride
Space-filling model of xenon oxytetrafluoride
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
  • InChI=1S/F4OXe/c1-6(2,3,4)5 checkY
    Key: ONRYXFFHIXYZMZ-UHFFFAOYSA-N checkY
  • InChI=1/F4OXe/c1-6(2,3,4)5
    Key: ONRYXFFHIXYZMZ-UHFFFAOYAY
  • F[Xe](F)(F)(F)=O
Properties
XeOF4
Molar mass 223.23 g/mol
Appearance colorless liquid
Density 3.17 g/cm3, liquid
Melting point −46.2 °C (−51.2 °F; 227.0 K)
Reacts with water
Structure
square pyramidal[1][2]
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
☒N verify (what is checkY☒N ?)

Xenon oxytetrafluoride (XeOF
4
) is an inorganic chemical compound. It is a colorless stable liquid[2][3] with a melting point of −46.2 °C (−51.2 °F; 227.0 K)[4] that can be synthesized by partial hydrolysis of XeF
6
, or the reaction of XeF
6
with silica[3] or NaNO
3
:[5]

NaNO
3
+ XeF
6
NaF + XeOF
4
+ FNO
2

A high-yield synthesis proceeds by the reaction of XeF
6
with POF
3
at −196 °C (−320.8 °F; 77.1 K).[6]

As are most xenon oxides, it is extremely reactive and unstable, and hydrolyses in water to give dangerously hazardous and corrosive products, including hydrogen fluoride:

2 XeOF
4
+ 4 H
2
O
→ 2 Xe + 8 HF + 3 O
2

In addition, some ozone and fluorine is formed.

Reactions

XeOF
4
reacts with H
2
O
in the following steps:

XeOF
4
+ H
2
O
XeO
2
F
2
+ 2 HF
XeO
2
F
2
+ H
2
O
XeO
3
+ 2 HF

The XeO
3
formed is a dangerous explosive, decomposing explosively to Xe and O
2
:

2 XeO
3
→ 2 Xe + 3 O
2

In its liquid form, XeOF
4
exhibits amphoteric behaviour, forming complexes with both strong Lewis bases like CsF and strong Lewis acids like SbF
5
.[7] It forms a 1:1 adduct with XeF
2
, isostructural with XeF
2
·IF
5
,[8] as well as various heavy alkali metal fluorides.[4]

The reaction of XeOF
4
with XeO
3
provides a convenient synthesis route for XeO
2
F
2
.[9]

References

  1. ^ Martins, Joseph; Wilson, E. Bright, Jr. (1964). "Microwave Spectrum of Xenon Oxytetrafluoride". The Journal of Chemical Physics. 41 (570): 570–571. Bibcode:1964JChPh..41..570M. doi:10.1063/1.1725910. ISSN 0021-9606.
  2. ^ a b Smith, D. F. (1963-05-24). "Xenon Oxyfluoride". Science. 140 (3569): 899–900. Bibcode:1963Sci...140..899S. doi:10.1126/science.140.3569.899. ISSN 0036-8075. JSTOR 00368075. LCCN 17024346. OCLC 1644869. PMID 17810680. S2CID 42752536.
  3. ^ a b Ibers, James A. (October 1965). "Molecular Structure". Annual Review of Physical Chemistry. 16: 375–396. Bibcode:1965ARPC...16..375I. doi:10.1146/annurev.pc.16.100165.002111. ISSN 0066-426X. LCCN a51001658. OCLC 1373069.
  4. ^ a b Selig, Henry (1966-02-01). "Complexes of Xenon Oxide Tetrafluoride". Inorganic Chemistry. 5 (2): 183–186. doi:10.1021/ic50036a004. ISSN 0020-1669.
  5. ^ Christe, Karl O.; Wilson, William W. (April 1988). "Convenient synthesis of xenon oxide tetrafluoride". Inorganic Chemistry. 27 (7): 1296–1297. doi:10.1021/ic00280a043. ISSN 0020-1669.
  6. ^ Nielsen, Jon B.; Kinkead, Scott A.; Eller, P. Gary (1990-09-01). "A New Synthesis of Xenon Oxytetrafluoride, XeOF4". Inorganic Chemistry. 29 (18): 3621–3622. doi:10.1021/ic00343a063. ISSN 0020-1669.
  7. ^ Martin-Rovet, D.; Angelié, C.; Cauchetier, M.; Schrobilgen, G. J. (September 1982). "Various aspects of the reactivity of the xenon(VI) oxyfluoride: XeOF4". Journal of Fluorine Chemistry. 21 (1): 10. doi:10.1016/S0022-1139(00)85330-0. ISSN 0022-1139.
  8. ^ Bartlett, N.; Wechsberg, M. (October 1971). "The Xenon Difluoride Complexes XeF2 · XeOF4; XeF2 · XeF6 · AsF5 and XeF2 · 2 XeF6 · 2 AsF5 and Their Relevance to Bond Polarity and Fluoride Ion Donor Ability of XeF2 and XeF6". Zeitschrift für anorganische und allgemeine Chemie. 385 (1). doi:10.1002/zaac.19713850103. ISSN 0044-2313. OCLC 1770423.
  9. ^ Huston, John L. (September 1967). "Xenon dioxide difluoride: isolation and some properties". The Journal of Physical Chemistry A. 71 (10): 3339–3341. doi:10.1021/j100869a035. ISSN 1089-5639.