2021 Census

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General information
CountryAustralia
Topics
Census topics
  • Location
  • Sex and gender
  • Households and families
  • Indigenous Australians
  • Income and work
  • Unpaid work and care
  • Education and training
  • Disability and carers
  • Cultural diversity
  • Religion
Trial census27 October 2020
AuthorityAustralian Bureau of Statistics
Websitecensus.abs.gov.au
Results
Total population25,422,788 (Increase 8.6%)
Most populous ​state or territoryNew South Wales
Least populous ​state or territoryNorthern Territory

The 2021 Australian census, simply called the 2021 Census, was the eighteenth national Census of Population and Housing in Australia. The 2021 Census took place on 10 August 2021, and was conducted by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).[1][2] The total population of the Commonwealth of Australia was counted as 25,422,788 – an increase of 8.6 per cent or 2,020,896 people over the previous 2016 census.[3]

Results from the 2021 census were released to the public on 28 June 2022 from the Australian Bureau of Statistics website. A small amount of additional 2021 census data will be released in October 2022 and in 2023.[4] Australia's next census is scheduled to take place in 2026.

Overview

In Australia, completing the census is compulsory for all people in Australia on census night, only excluding foreign diplomats and their families.[5] Census data is used to "help governments, businesses, not for profit and community organisations across the country make informed decisions", including helping governments to plan the provision of services.[2] An independent report from Lateral Economics found that for every $1 of investment on the census, $6 of benefits are created in the Australian economy.[6]

Since the 2001 Census, all households have the option of allowing their census data, including personal information such as names and addresses, to be stored by the National Archives of Australia (NAA) for 99 years. 99 years after Census Night, the NAA will release that data to the public in a Census Time Capsule. Censuses stored by the NAA cannot by accessed, amended, or retrieved by anyone, including courts and tribunal, until their release, the first of which will occur in 2100.[7]

The 2020 Census Test occurred on 27 October 2020 with around 100,000 households from Sydney, Adelaide, Darwin, and Canberra, as well as communities in Karratha, Warrnambool, and Alice Springs Town Camps.[8]

Topics

Every census, the ABS makes a recommendation to the Australian Government on the topics to be included, based on the benefit that data would provide to Australia. Through the Census and Statistics Amendment (Statistical Information) Regulations 2020, the federal parliament approves topics that may be included. For the 2021 census, the ABS had been authorised to include questions relating to long-term health conditions and service in the Australian Defence Force, and would not continue asking questions about home internet access considering the rise of mobile devices. This represented the first significant change to census topics since 2006.[9]

Alongside these two new topics, the 2021 Census continued to ask questions related to:[9]

Consultations

Through late 2017, the ABS began discussions with major census data users on what was needed. From 3 April to 30 June 2018, a formal consultation process occurred on the online "ABS Consultation Hub", with the ABS receiving 450 submissions, 315 of which were published with consent.[10]

Collection

Since 2006, the ABS has allowed the census to be completed online, moving in 2016 to be digital-first. Like 2016, the 2021 Census was primarily collected online, with paper census forms being available on request for any household. In 2016, around a third of all households requested and completed their census using the paper form. It was planned that in late October 2019, the ABS would publish a market opportunity to seek a commercial partner to build the 2021 Census Digital Service.[11]

Population and dwellings

The population counts for Australian states and territories were that New South Wales remains the most populous state, with 8,072,163 people counted, ahead of Victoria (6,503,491) and Queensland (5,156,138). The total population of Australian as counted in the 2021 census by state and external territories are:[12][13][14][15]

States and territories Male Female Total % change
New South Wales 3,984,166 4,087,995 8,072,163 Increase 7.9%
Victoria 3,200,963 3,302,528 6,503,491 Increase 9.7%
Queensland 2,540,404 2,615,736 5,156,138 Increase 9.6%
Western Australia 1,322,855 1,337,171 2,660,026 Increase 7.5%
South Australia 878,592 902,924 1,781,516 Increase 6.3%
Tasmania 273,765 283,804 557,571 Increase 9.3%
Australian Capital Territory 224,361 230,140 454,499 Increase 14.4%
Northern Territory 117,526 115,075 232,605 Increase 9.7%
External Territories
Christmas Island TBD TBD 1,692 Decrease
Norfolk Island TBD TBD 2,188 Increase
Cocos (Keeling) Islands TBD TBD TBD Decrease
Jervis Bay Territory TBD TBD 310 Decrease
Australia 12,545,154 12,877,635 25,422,788 8.7

Country of birth

Country of birth of Australian residents at 2021 census[16]
Country of birth of Australian residents at 2021 census[16]

Of all residents over two-thirds (72.4% or 18,235,690) were born in Australia. Over a quarter of the population (27.6% or 7,502,450 persons) said they were born overseas. After Australia, England is the most common birthplace with 927,490 people.[a][16]

  1. ^ The Australian Bureau of Statistics source lists England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland separately although they are all part of the United Kingdom. These should not be combined as they are not combined in the source.

See also

References

  1. ^ "2021 Census questions and date announced". Australian Bureau of Statistics. 18 June 2020. Archived from the original on 28 January 2021. Retrieved 7 November 2020.
  2. ^ a b "2021 Census overview". Australian Bureau of Statistics. Archived from the original on 27 February 2018. Retrieved 5 November 2020.
  3. ^ "Population: Census Information on sex and age". Australian Bureau of Statistics. 28 June 2022. Retrieved 13 August 2022.
  4. ^ "2021 Census product release guide". Australian Bureau of Statistics. Retrieved 27 April 2022.
  5. ^ "Advice on the Australian Bureau of Statistics Population and Housing Census 2021". Australian Government Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade. 24 March 2021. Archived from the original on 6 October 2022. Retrieved 6 October 2022.
  6. ^ "Valuing the Australian Census" (PDF). Australian Bureau of Statistics. Lateral Economics. 27 August 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on 25 September 2019. Retrieved 7 November 2020.
  7. ^ "Census Time Capsule". Australian Bureau of Statistics. 20 August 2015. Archived from the original on 8 September 2015. Retrieved 7 November 2020.
  8. ^ "Welcome to the 2020 Census Test". Australian Bureau of Statistics. Archived from the original on 24 June 2020. Retrieved 7 November 2020.
  9. ^ a b "Review of 2021 Census topics". Australian Bureau of Statistics. Archived from the original on 27 February 2018. Retrieved 7 November 2020.
  10. ^ "Review of 2021 Census Topics". ABS Consultation Hub. 14 November 2018. Archived from the original on 3 April 2018. Retrieved 7 November 2020.
  11. ^ "Sourcing the 2021 Census Digital Service". Australian Bureau of Statistics. Archived from the original on 25 September 2018. Retrieved 7 November 2020.
  12. ^ "Population: Census Information on sex and age". abs.gov.au. 28 June 2022. Retrieved 13 August 2022.
  13. ^ "Christmas Island 2021 Census All persons QuickStats". abs.gov.au. 28 June 2022. Retrieved 13 August 2022.
  14. ^ "Norfolk Island 2021 Census All persons QuickStats". abs.gov.au. 28 June 2022. Retrieved 13 August 2022.
  15. ^ "Jervis Bay 2021 Census All persons QuickStats". abs.gov.au. 28 June 2022. Retrieved 13 August 2022.
  16. ^ a b "Cultural diversity: Census Information on country of birth, year of arrival, ancestry, language and religion". Australian Bureau of Statistics. 28 June 2022. Retrieved 11 August 2022.