Attajdid
التجديد
TypeDaily newspaper
Founded1999; 22 years ago (1999)
LanguageArabic
HeadquartersCasablanca
Websitewww.attajdid.ma

Attajdid (The Renewal in English)[1] is a Moroccan newspaper which is published in Arabic.[2]

History and profile

Attajdid was established in 1999.[3] The paper has a generally Muslim conservative stance and the media outlet of the Movement of Unity and Reform.[2] It has also close ties with Justice and Development Party.[4] The paper is headquartered in Casablanca.[3][5]

Controversy

In 2003, the paper published critical articles against those who listened to heavy metal in the country and developed an analogy between heavy metal music and satanism.[4] On 6 January 2005, Attajdid published an article by its editor-in-chief Lhassan Sarrat that the deadly 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and ensuing tsunami was God's punishment for sex tourism, homosexuality and child trafficking in southeast Asia, and that the best warning system for such catastrophes was following the teaching of Islam.[6] They stated that Morocco was the next destination for this "tourism of debauchery". This statement attracted considerable controversy and opposition. The newspaper then distanced itself from the article; director Abdelilah Benkirane declared that the article represented only the opinion of its author.

References

  1. ^ Aziz Douai (2009). "In Democracy's Shadow: The 'New' Independent Press and the Limits of Media Reform in Morocco" (PDF). Westminster Papers in Communication and Culture. 6 (1). Archived from the original (PDF) on 27 February 2012. Retrieved 21 January 2014.
  2. ^ a b Marvine Howe (2 June 2005). Morocco: The Islamist Awakening and Other Challenges: The Islamist Awakening and Other Challenges. Oxford University Press. p. 240. ISBN 978-0-19-534698-5. Retrieved 21 January 2014.
  3. ^ a b "Media landscape. Morocco". Menassat. Archived from the original on 15 October 2014. Retrieved 9 October 2014.
  4. ^ a b Mjahd, Rania (25 July 2013). "Moroccan Media and Moral panic". Morocco World News. Retrieved 3 December 2013.
  5. ^ Newspapers[permanent dead link] Hot Newspapers. Retrieved 21 January 2013.
  6. ^ "Morocco protest over tsunami row". BBC. 30 January 2005. Retrieved 21 January 2014.