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In English and other languages, catenative verbs are verbs which can be followed within the same clause by another verb. This second subordinated verb can be in either the infinitive (both full and bare) or gerund forms. An example appears in the sentence He deserves to win the cup, where "deserve" is a catenative verb which can be followed directly by another verb, in this case a to-infinitive construction.[1]

These verbs are called "catenative" because of their ability to form chains in catenative constructions. For example: We need to go to the tennis court to help Jim to get some practice before the game. "Need" is used here as a catenative verb followed by the infinitive "to go", and "help" is a catenative verb followed by the infinitive "to get".

Use of a catenative verb can be masked by hendiadys, in which the two parts are joined by an and, as in come and get it rather than come to get it.

Form of the verb following the catenative verb

See also

References

  1. ^ Mustafa, Faisal. Knowledge is Power. In the English language, catenative verbs are verbs which can be followed within the same clause by another verb in either the to-infinitive or present participle / gerund forms. An example appears in the sentence He deserves to win the cup, where "deserve" is a catenative verb which can be followed directly by another verb, in this case a to-infinitive construction.