Cheverly
Town of Cheverly
Flag of Cheverly
Official seal of Cheverly
Location of Cheverly, Maryland
Location of Cheverly, Maryland
Coordinates: 38°55′28.12″N 76°54′48.56″W / 38.9244778°N 76.9134889°W / 38.9244778; -76.9134889
Country United States of America
State Maryland
County Prince George's
IncorporatedApril 18, 1931
Government
 • MayorKayce Munyeneh
Area
 • Total1.32 sq mi (3.41 km2)
 • Land1.32 sq mi (3.41 km2)
 • Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation
955 ft (291 m)
Population
 (2020)
 • Total6,170
 • Density4,681.34/sq mi (1,808.15/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (EST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP codes
20784 & 20785
Area code(s)301, 240
FIPS code24-16550
GNIS feature ID0597234
Websitehttps://www.cheverly-md.gov/

Cheverly is a town in Prince George's County, Maryland, United States, located very close to Washington, D.C., though not bordering it directly. The town was founded in 1918 and incorporated in 1931. Per the 2020 census, the population was 6,170.[2] Cheverly borders the communities of Tuxedo, Chapel Oaks, Landover, Landover Hills, Villa Heights, and Bladensburg.

Cheverly is home to the Prince George's County Health Department, Cheverly Professional Building, PepsiCo bottling plant, Judith P Hoyer Early Childhood Center, Cheverly American Legion, Magruder Spring Historic Landmark, ABC Supply Company Inc., Washington Woodworking Company, Cheverly Sport Fair Fishing Store, and Publick Playhouse Theater. The main ZIP code for Cheverly is 20785. Until 2021, Cheverly had been home to the University of Maryland (UM) Prince George’s Hospital Center, which was founded in 1944 and was known as a first-class trauma center. The facility closed on June 12, 2021, replaced by the all-new, $543 million UM Capital Region Medical Center, which opened the same day in nearby Largo, Md.[3]

History

Cheverly was begun as a planned suburb in the early 1900s. The Cheverly area was first platted in 1904 for a 93-acre (380,000 m2) community called Cheverly Gardens. The land was subsequently purchased in 1918 by Robert Marshall, president of the Washington Suburban Realty Company. The Cheverly subdivision platted by Marshall was developed around the 1839 Magruder family homestead known as Mount Hope. Marshall became the first resident of Cheverly by taking up residence in the restored homestead in 1919. In 1923, the first road, now known as Cheverly Avenue, was completed and paved to connect the Pennsylvania Railroad line to Landover Road. Thirty-four developer-built houses were constructed between 1921 and 1925. Most of the early houses were mail-order homes from Sears & Roebuck and the McClure Homes Company. Marshall lost control of the Washington Suburban Realty Company in 1927. Harry Wardman assumed the position until the company’s bankruptcy in 1929 due to the stock market crash.[4]

Incorporation was granted in 1931 to address concerns for better roads and services. During the 1930s and 1940s, the streets were improved and lighting enhanced, and the number of residences increased from 135 to 650. Residential construction continued through the 1960s, creating a varied housing stock of early Cape Cod houses, with later ranch and split-level types. Two garden-style apartment complexes (Cheverly Terrace and Hanson Arms) were constructed in the early 1960s along Landover Road near the U.S. Route 50 interchange. The community center, town hall, and park facility was built in 1978. Industrial property was established in 1958 on the west side of town and adjacent to Route 50.[4]

On April 29, 2006, the community held a 75th anniversary celebration at the town community center. The historic home Mount Hope had been the town's official symbol since 1931, however, on June 11, 2020 the Mayor and Council voted unanimous to remove the home from the Town Seal and redesign it.[5]

Historic sites

The following is a list of historic sites in Cheverly identified by the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission:[6]

Site Name Image Location M-NCPPC Inventory Number Comment
1 Raymond W. Bellamy House (Belmar) 2819 Cheverly Avenue 69-024-22
2 Crawford’s Adventure Spring In Cheverly Nature Park, West of Belleview Avenue 69-024-14
3 The Magruder Spring East of Cheverly Avenue and South of Arbor Street 69-024-13
4 Mount Hope 1 Cheverly Circle 69-024-11 Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, 1978-11-29

Geography

Cheverly is located at 38°55′28″N 76°54′49″W / 38.92444°N 76.91361°W / 38.92444; -76.91361 (38.924478, -76.913488).[7]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 1.35 square miles (3.50 km2), all land.[8]

While a majority of the homes in Cheverly are small to mid-sized red brick homes, there are a few apartment complexes. The names of these apartment complexes notably are:

Bordering areas

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.Note
1940996
19503,318233.1%
19605,22357.4%
19706,80830.3%
19805,751−15.5%
19906,0234.7%
20006,4336.8%
20106,173−4.0%
20206,1700.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[9]
2010[10] 2020[11]

2020 census

Cheverly town, Maryland – Demographic Profile
(NH = Non-Hispanic)
Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos may be of any race.
Race / Ethnicity Pop 2010[10] Pop 2020[11] % 2010 % 2020
White alone (NH) 1,752 1,929 28.38% 31.26%
Black or African American alone (NH) 3,479 2,871 56.36% 46.53%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH) 6 7 0.10% 0.11%
Asian alone (NH) 101 144 1.64% 2.33%
Pacific Islander alone (NH) 0 4 0.00% 0.06%
Some Other Race alone (NH) 24 28 0.39% 0.45%
Mixed Race/Multi-Racial (NH) 160 312 2.59% 5.06%
Hispanic or Latino (any race) 651 875 10.55% 14.18%
Total 6,173 6,170 100.00% 100.00%

2010 census

As of the census[12] of 2010, there were 6,173 people, 2,287 households, and 1,568 families living in the town. The population density was 4,572.6 inhabitants per square mile (1,765.5/km2). There were 2,395 housing units at an average density of 1,774.1 per square mile (685.0/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 32.4% White, 57.1% African American, 0.1% Native American, 1.7% Asian, 5.3% from other races, and 3.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 10.5% of the population.

There were 2,287 households, of which 36.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.3% were married couples living together, 17.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 6.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 31.4% were non-families. 23.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 4.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.17.

The median age in the town was 37.8 years. 23.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.5% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 28.7% were from 25 to 44; 30.6% were from 45 to 64; and 8.5% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 50.6% male and 49.4% female.

As of the American Community Survey[12] of 2013, the median income for a household in the town was $95,274, and the median income for a family was $112,353. The median income for married-couple families was $123,218, and the median income for non-family households was $54,079.

2000 census

As of the census[13] of 2000, there were 6,433 people, 2,258 households, and 1,637 families living in the town. The population density was 4,769.9 inhabitants per square mile (1,841.7/km2). There were 2,348 housing units at an average density of 1,741.0 per square mile (672.2/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 56.79% African American, 33.86% White, 6.76% Hispanic or Latino of any race, 3.44% from two or more races, 3.22% from other races, 2.50% Asian, 0.17% Native American, and 0.03% Pacific Islander.

There were 2,258 households, out of which 39.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.8% were married couples living together, 17.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.5% were non-families. 20.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 4.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.85 and the average family size was 3.30.

In the town, the population was spread out, with 28.5% under the age of 18, 7.6% from 18 to 24, 31.7% from 25 to 44, 24.2% from 45 to 64, and 8.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.3 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $65,431, and the median income for a family was $67,540. Males had a median income of $39,237 versus $36,757 for females. The per capita income for the town was $24,096. About 4.9% of families and 6.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.7% of those under age 18 and 4.1% of those age 65 or over.

Government

Prince George's County Police Department District 1 Station in Hyattsville serves Bladensburg.[14]

Transportation

A Metro train at the Cheverly Station
View east along US 50 from the overpass for MD 459 in Cheverly

The major freeways serving Cheverly are U.S. Route 50, which skims the southern edge of town, and the Baltimore-Washington Parkway, which brushes the west side of town. Both roads have interchanges with Maryland Route 202, which is the main at-grade highway crossing the town. In addition, Maryland Route 459 (known as Tuxedo Road for most of its length) serves as a connector between US 50 on the south side of town and Maryland Route 201 just west of the town.

The Cheverly station on the Metro Orange Line is located in Cheverly just south of Route 50.

Education

Cheverly is served by the Prince George's County Public Schools system.[15]

Public schools serving Cheverly include:

Judith P. Hoyer Early Childhood Center is also in Cheverly.

Private schools:

Parks and recreation

Notable people

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References

  1. ^ "2020 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 26, 2022.
  2. ^ "Cheverly town, Maryland". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 15, 2022.
  3. ^ "Goodbye to Prince George's Hospital Center, my beacon on the hill - The Washington Post".
  4. ^ a b "Community Summary Sheet, Prince George's County" (PDF). Cheverly, Maryland. Maryland State Highway Administration, 1999. May 10, 2008.
  5. ^ "Special Meeting - Town Seal | Cheverly, MD". www.cheverly-md.gov. Retrieved March 15, 2021.
  6. ^ M-NCPPC Illustrated Inventory of Historic Sites (Prince George's County, Maryland), 2006 Archived 2008-07-25 at the Wayback Machine.
  7. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  8. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on January 25, 2012. Retrieved January 25, 2013.
  9. ^ "Decennial Census by Decade". US Census Bureau.
  10. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE – 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) – Cheverly town, Maryland". United States Census Bureau.
  11. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE – 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) – Cheverly town, Maryland". United States Census Bureau.
  12. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 21, 2015.
  13. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  14. ^ "District 1 Station - Hyattsville Archived September 9, 2018, at the Wayback Machine. Prince George's County Police Department. Retrieved on September 9, 2018. Beat map Archived September 9, 2018, at the Wayback Machine.
  15. ^ "2010 CENSUS - CENSUS BLOCK MAP: Cheverly town, MD." U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on August 31, 2018. See also Cheverly Ward Map Archived 2018-08-31 at the Wayback Machine.
  16. ^ "NEIGHBORHOOD ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS AND BOUNDARIES SCHOOL YEAR 2018-2019." Prince George's County Public Schools. Retrieved on August 31, 2018.
  17. ^ "NEIGHBORHOOD MIDDLE SCHOOLS AND BOUNDARIES SCHOOL YEAR 2018-2019." Prince George's County Public Schools. Retrieved on August 31, 2018.
  18. ^ "NEIGHBORHOOD HIGH SCHOOLS AND BOUNDARIES SCHOOL YEAR 2018-2019." Prince George's County Public Schools. Retrieved on August 31, 2018.
  19. ^ Home. Saint Ambrose Catholic School. Retrieved on September 4, 2018. "St. Ambrose Catholic School 6310 Jason St. Cheverly, MD 20785"
  20. ^ Chung, King-Thom. "Margaret Pittman (1905-1995): Pioneer in Standardization of Biological Products and Studies of Whooping Cough." Women Pioneers of Medical Research: Biographies of 25 Outstanding Scientists. (McFarland & Company, Inc., 2010), page 123.
  21. ^ "Michael Taylor Stats". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved December 10, 2012.