Chris Scott
Chris Scott 2018.1.jpg
Scott with Geelong in August 2018
Personal information
Full name Christopher Michael Scott
Date of birth (1976-05-03) 3 May 1976 (age 46)
Place of birth Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Original team(s) Eastern Ranges
Draft 12th overall, 1993
Brisbane Bears
Height 182 cm (6 ft 0 in)
Weight 90 kg (198 lb)
Playing career1
Years Club Games (Goals)
1994–1996 Brisbane Bears 55 (23)
1997–2007 Brisbane Lions 160 (56)
Total 215 (79)
Coaching career3
Years Club Games (W–L–D)
2011– Geelong 286 (200–84–2)

2017
Representative
Australia

2 (2–0–0)
1 Playing statistics correct to the end of 2007.
3 Coaching statistics correct as of 2022.
Career highlights
Sources: AFL Tables, AustralianFootball.com

Christopher Michael Scott (born 3 May 1976) is a former Australian rules footballer in the Australian Football League (AFL) best known for being a dual premiership player with the Brisbane Lions in addition to a dual premiership coach at Geelong in 2011 and 2022. He attended St Kevin’s College, Toorak, Melbourne. He has been the coach of the Geelong Football Club from 2011.

Playing career

Brisbane Bears

Chris Scott was picked by the Brisbane Bears in the 1993 AFL Draft with the 12th draft pick and moved to Queensland while still studying at St Kevin's College. He studied at Brisbane Boys' College during his first years as an AFL player.[1][2]

Scott made his AFL debut in 1994 with the Brisbane Bears, taking out the Norwich Rising Star award.

Scott became one of the AFL's toughest defensive players, using his strength to outmuscle opposing forwards. Along with his brother Brad, they were nicknamed the Kray brothers by some fans for their forceful and ruthless styles of play.

Scott played a total of 55 games and kicked a total of 23 goals for Brisbane Bears from 1994 until 1996.[1][2]

Brisbane Lions

At the end of the 1996 season, following the merger of the Fitzroy Football Club and the Brisbane Bears, Chris Scott joined the newly formed Brisbane Lions.[1][2]

During Brisbane Lions's three-peat era, Scott was part of a powerful backline also containing Mal Michael, Chris Johnson and Justin Leppitsch. He was a member of the 2001 and 2002 premiership sides, but did not play in the 2003 AFL Grand Final after being named an emergency.[3]

He caused controversy in round 1 of 2005 when Scott, along with Mal Michael, crashed into St Kilda's Nick Riewoldt after Riewoldt chose to stay on the ground with a broken collarbone. In the same game Scott also had several teeth knocked out after receiving a back-handed fist from opponent Aaron Hamill.[4]

Scott's later career was plagued with injuries. Brisbane's round 22, 2007 match against Geelong on 1 September 2007 became his last, after he announced his retirement from his playing career a few days earlier on 28 August 2007.[5][6]

Scott played a total of 160 games and kicked 56 goals for Brisbane Lions from 1997 until 2007.[1][2]

Coaching career

Scott following the Cats 2011 premiership win.
Scott following the Cats 2011 premiership win.

Fremantle Football Club assistant coach (2008–2010)

In 2008, Scott joined Fremantle Football Club as an assistant coach under senior coach Mark Harvey.[7]

Geelong Football Club senior coach (2011–present)

In 2010, Scott was a frontrunner for the Port Adelaide Football Club senior coaching position to replace the sacked Mark Williams but ultimately fell short and caretaker senior coach and former Port captain, Matthew Primus, was chosen by the selection committee to be the club's senior coach. The media speculated that Scott was considered the second best applicant by the selection committee. On 18 October 2010, it was officially announced by the Geelong Football Club that Scott would be their senior coach, following Mark Thompson's resignation at the end of the 2010 season.[8][9]

Scott had a brilliant start to his AFL coaching career, with Geelong winning its first thirteen matches of the 2011 season. His thirteen wins in succession was the best start to a coaching career in almost 80 years. But this streak was broken in round 15, when the Cats went down to Essendon by four points. Scott coached Geelong to its third Grand Final in five years and became the first senior coach since Malcolm Blight in 1997 to win a premiership as a first-year club senior coach, when Geelong under Scott defeated Collingwood in the 2011 AFL Grand Final by a margin of 38 points, where the final score was Geelong 18.11 (119) to Collingwood 12.9 (81).[10] He is also the youngest premiership coach since Alex Jesaulenko in 1979 to win a Grand Final.

In August 2014, Scott signed a two-year contract extension extending his tenure as senior coach of Geelong until the end of 2017.[11]

In August 2018, Scott signed a four-year contract extension extending his tenure as senior coach of Geelong until the end of 2022.[12]

In the 2020 season, which was significantly affected by the Covid-19 pandemic in Australia, Scott coached Geelong to the 2020 AFL Grand Final, but fell short and lost to Richmond by a margin of 31 points, where the final score was Richmond 12.9.(81) to Geelong 7.8.(50).[13]

In the 2022 season, Scott coached Geelong to a premiership win in the 2022 AFL Grand Final, where Geelong under Scott defeated Sydney Swans by a margin of 81 points, where the final score was Geelong 20.13 (133) to Sydney Swans 8.4 (52), This made Scott a two-time premiership coach.[14]

Statistics

Playing statistics

[15]
Legend
  G  
Goals
  K  
Kicks
  D  
Disposals 
  T  
Tackles
  B  
Behinds 
  H  
Handballs 
  M  
Marks
  #  
Played in that season's 
premiership team
Season Team No. Games Totals Averages (per game) Votes
G B K H D M T G B K H D M T
1994 Brisbane Bears 22 19 9 6 193 88 281 66 27 0.5 0.3 10.2 4.6 14.8 3.5 1.4 1
1995 Brisbane Bears 22 14 8 12 118 65 183 57 10 0.6 0.9 8.4 4.6 13.1 4.1 0.7 0
1996 Brisbane Bears 22 22 6 8 199 110 309 62 33 0.3 0.4 9.0 5.0 14.0 2.8 1.5 0
1997 Brisbane Lions 22 5 3 1 26 19 45 15 2 0.6 0.2 5.2 3.8 9.0 3.0 0.4 0
1998 Brisbane Lions 22 21 14 8 296 156 452 100 45 0.7 0.4 14.1 7.4 21.5 4.8 2.1 1
1999 Brisbane Lions 22 24 4 4 363 150 513 150 34 0.2 0.2 15.1 6.3 21.4 6.3 1.4 7
2000 Brisbane Lions 22 21 7 5 274 135 409 137 48 0.3 0.2 13.0 6.4 19.5 6.5 2.3 0
2001# Brisbane Lions 22 20 8 7 275 121 396 142 31 0.4 0.4 13.8 6.1 19.8 7.1 1.6 2
2002# Brisbane Lions 22 22 5 3 260 130 390 134 30 0.2 0.1 11.8 5.9 17.7 6.1 1.4 3
2003 Brisbane Lions 22 19 2 2 179 88 267 108 38 0.1 0.1 9.4 4.6 14.1 5.7 2.0 0
2004 Brisbane Lions 22 13 3 1 106 52 158 49 25 0.2 0.1 8.2 4.0 12.2 3.8 1.9 0
2005 Brisbane Lions 22 13 10 8 110 34 144 68 23 0.8 0.6 8.5 2.6 11.1 5.2 1.8 0
2006 Brisbane Lions 22 0
2007 Brisbane Lions 22 2 0 0 8 8 16 6 5 0.0 0.0 4.0 4.0 8.0 3.0 2.5 0
Career 215 79 65 2407 1156 3563 1094 351 0.4 0.3 11.2 5.4 16.6 5.1 1.6 14

Coaching statistics

Updated to the end of the 2022 season.[16]

Legend
 W  Wins  L  Losses  D  Draws  W%  Winning percentage  LP  Ladder position  LT  League teams
Season Team Games W L D W % LP LT
2011# Geelong 25 22 3 0 88.0% 2 (1) 17
2012 Geelong 23 15 8 0 65.2% 6 (7) 18
2013 Geelong 25 19 6 0 76.0% 2 (3) 18
2014 Geelong 24 17 7 0 70.8% 3 (5) 18
2015 Geelong 21 11 9 1 52.4% 10 18
2016 Geelong 24 18 6 0 75.0% 2 (3) 18
2017 Geelong 25 16 8 1 64.0% 2 (3) 18
2018 Geelong 23 13 10 0 56.5% 8 (8) 18
2019 Geelong 25 17 8 0 68.0% 1 (3) 18
2020 Geelong 21 14 7 0 66.7% 4 (2) 18
2021 Geelong 25 17 8 0 68.0% 3 (4) 18
2022# Geelong 25 21 4 0 84.0% 1 (1) 18
Career totals 286 200 84 2 70.3%

Honours and achievements

Brownlow Medal votes
Season Votes
1994 1
1995 0
1996 0
1997 0
1998 1
1999 7
2000 0
2001 2
2002 3
2003 0
2004 0
2005 0
2006 0
2007 0
Total 14

Playing honours

Team

Individual

Coaching honours

Team

Individual

Personal life

Scott (left) being interviewed by former Geelong premiership captain Cameron Ling (right) during a match in 2014.
Scott (left) being interviewed by former Geelong premiership captain Cameron Ling (right) during a match in 2014.

Scott's identical twin brother Brad Scott played alongside him at the Brisbane Lions and is the senior coach of Essendon. Chris is the older twin by a few minutes.

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Chris Scott". 27 November 2019. Retrieved 25 September 2022.
  2. ^ a b c d "CHRIS SCOTT". Retrieved 25 September 2022.
  3. ^ Cherny, Daniel (8 September 2014). "Brad and Chris Scott: Seven things you didn't know about the AFL's twins". theage.com.au. Retrieved 24 September 2022.
  4. ^ "Horror night for Saints". Melbourne: The Age. 25 March 2005. Retrieved 28 August 2007.
  5. ^ "Scott finishes the game". 28 August 2007. Retrieved 25 September 2022.
  6. ^ "Veteran Lion confirms retirement". 27 August 2007. Retrieved 25 September 2022.
  7. ^ AAP; Harvey promises cruel summer; The Age; 2007-10-29; Retrieved on 2008-02-19
  8. ^ "Chris Scott earns Geelong Cats coaching gig". 18 October 2010. Retrieved 25 September 2022.
  9. ^ "Cats announce Chris Scott as new coach". 18 October 2010. Retrieved 25 September 2022.
  10. ^ "Geelong wins 2011 AFL grand final". 30 September 2011. Retrieved 28 September 2022.
  11. ^ Auciello, Michael (13 August 2014). "Chris Scott signs two-year contract with Geelong until the end of 2017". Geelong Advertiser. News Corp Australia. Archived from the original on 27 March 2015. Retrieved 27 March 2015.
  12. ^ "Scott signs on with Geelong until end of 2022". 20 August 2018.
  13. ^ "AFL Grand Final 2020 - Richmond Tigers vs Geelong Cats". 24 October 2020. Retrieved 25 September 2022.
  14. ^ "As it happened AFL grand final 2022: Brilliant Cats smash meek Swans to clinch 10th flag, Smith wins Norm Smith". 24 September 2022. Retrieved 25 September 2022.
  15. ^ Chris Scott's player profile at AFL Tables
  16. ^ "Chris Scott's coaching profile". AFL Tables.