Civil War Monuments in Washington, D.C.
LocationWashington, D.C.
NRHP reference No.78000257[1]
Added to NRHPSeptember 20, 1978 [2]

The Civil War Monuments in Washington, D.C. are a group of seventeen outdoor statues which are spread out through much of central and northwest Washington, D.C.[3] The statues depict 11 Union generals and formerly included one Confederate general, Albert Pike, who was depicted as a Mason and not as a general. The Pike statue was torn down on Juneteenth 2020, as part of the George Floyd protests.[4][5] Two Union admirals are honored, although Admiral Samuel Francis DuPont's statue was removed to Wilmington, Delaware, and he is now honored with a fountain. Other statues depict nuns, peace, emancipation, and the Grand Army of the Republic.

In accordance with Executive Order 11593 by President Richard Nixon, the National Park Service surveyed and registered the 18 Civil War statues in Washington, D.C. to aid in their preservation.[6][7][8] They are listed as a group on the National Register of Historic Places.

Statues

Stephenson Grand Army of the Republic Memorial
Emancipation Memorial
  1. Samuel Francis DuPont Memorial Fountain 38°54′35″N 77°2′36″W / 38.90972°N 77.04333°W / 38.90972; -77.04333 (DuPont Memorial Fountain)
  2. Nuns of the Battlefield 38°54′21″N 77°2′25″W / 38.90583°N 77.04028°W / 38.90583; -77.04028 (Nuns of the Battlefield)
  3. Stephenson Grand Army of the Republic Memorial 38°53′37″N 77°1′18″W / 38.89361°N 77.02167°W / 38.89361; -77.02167 (Grand Army of the Republic)
  4. Peace Monument 38°53′26″N 77°0′44″W / 38.89056°N 77.01222°W / 38.89056; -77.01222 (Peace Monument)
  5. Ulysses S. Grant Memorial 38°53′23″N 77°0′46″W / 38.88972°N 77.01278°W / 38.88972; -77.01278 (U.S. Grant)
  6. Major General James B. McPherson 38°54′7″N 77°2′3″W / 38.90194°N 77.03417°W / 38.90194; -77.03417 (Gen. McPherson)
  7. Admiral David G. Farragut 38°54′7″N 77°2′20″W / 38.90194°N 77.03889°W / 38.90194; -77.03889 (Admiral Farragut)
  8. Major General John A. Logan 38°54′35″N 77°1′47″W / 38.90972°N 77.02972°W / 38.90972; -77.02972 (Gen. Logan)
  9. Major General George Henry Thomas 38°54′20″N 77°1′57″W / 38.90556°N 77.03250°W / 38.90556; -77.03250 (Gen. Thomas)
  10. Brevet Lt. General Winfield Scott 38°54′26″N 77°2′12″W / 38.90722°N 77.03667°W / 38.90722; -77.03667 (Gen. Scott)
  11. General Winfield Scott Hancock 38°53′37″N 77°1′20″W / 38.89361°N 77.02222°W / 38.89361; -77.02222 (Gen. Hancock)
  12. General John A. Rawlins 38°53′45″N 77°2′31″W / 38.89583°N 77.04194°W / 38.89583; -77.04194 (Gen. Rawlins)
  13. General Philip Sheridan 38°54′44″N 77°3′2″W / 38.91222°N 77.05056°W / 38.91222; -77.05056 (Gen. Sheridan)
  14. Major General George B. McClellan 38°55′0″N 77°2′47″W / 38.91667°N 77.04639°W / 38.91667; -77.04639 (Gen. McClellan)
  15. General William Tecumseh Sherman Monument 38°53′46″N 77°2′3″W / 38.89611°N 77.03417°W / 38.89611; -77.03417 (Gen. Sherman)
  16. George Gordon Meade Memorial 38°53′32″N 77°0′59″W / 38.89222°N 77.01639°W / 38.89222; -77.01639 (Gen. Meade)
  17. Emancipation Memorial 38°53′23″N 76°59′25″W / 38.88972°N 76.99028°W / 38.88972; -76.99028 (Emancipation Memorial)


See also

Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap  Download coordinates as: KML

References

  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  2. ^ "American Revolution Statuary". National Park Service. September 20, 1978. Archived from the original on February 20, 2013. Retrieved August 10, 2011.
  3. ^ https://npgallery.nps.gov/NRHP/GetAsset/NRHP/78000257_text
  4. ^ Umana, Jose (20 June 2020). "DC protesters topple, burn statue of Confederate Gen. Albert Pike". WTOP-FM. Retrieved 21 June 2020. It was toppled by protesters at Judiciary Square in D.C. on Friday evening Juneteenth 2020. (Photo caption)
  5. ^ Dwyer, Colin (20 June 2020). "Protesters Fell Confederate Monument In D.C., Provoking Trump's Fury". National Public Radio. Retrieved 21 June 2020.
  6. ^ America's National Park System: The Critical Documents – Edited by Lary M. Dilsaver
  7. ^ "VI. Executive Orders". Archived from the original on 2011-09-27. Retrieved 2011-08-12.
  8. ^ "Executive Orders". National Archives. 2016-08-15. Retrieved 2021-10-05.