Fatal Fury
Genre(s)Fighting game
Developer(s)SNK
Takara
Aspect
Publisher(s)SNK
Creator(s)Takashi Nishiyama
Platform(s)Arcade
Dreamcast
FM Towns
Game Boy
Microsoft Windows
Neo Geo
Neo Geo CD
Neo Geo Pocket Color
Nintendo Switch
PC Engine
PlayStation
PlayStation 2
PlayStation 4
PlayStation Vita
Sega CD
Sega Game Gear
Sega Genesis
Sega Saturn
SNES
Virtual Console
X68000
Xbox Live Arcade
Xbox One
First releaseFatal Fury: King of Fighters
November 25, 1991
Latest releaseGarou: Mark of the Wolves
November 26, 1999

Fatal Fury, known as Garō Densetsu (餓狼伝説, Legend of the Hungry Wolf) in Japan, is a fighting game series developed by SNK for the Neo Geo system.

Games

Titles in the Fatal Fury series
English title Original platform Release date Ports
Fatal Fury: King of Fighters Neo Geo 1991-11-25 Neo Geo (MVS, AES) Neo Geo CD, Sega Genesis, Sharp X68000, SNES, PlayStation 2, Virtual Console, PSN, PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, Xbox One
Fatal Fury 2 Neo Geo 1992-12-10 Neo Geo (MVS, AES) Neo Geo CD, PC Engine, Sega Genesis, SNES, Game Boy, Sharp X68000, PlayStation 2, Virtual Console, Nintendo Switch, Xbox One
Fatal Fury Special Neo Geo 1993-09-16 Neo Geo (MVS, AES), FM Towns, Game Gear, Neo Geo, Neo Geo CD, Sega CD, SNES, TurboGrafx-CD, PlayStation 2, Virtual Console, Sharp X68000, Xbox Live Arcade, iOS, Nintendo Switch, Microsoft Windows, Xbox One
Fatal Fury 3: Road to the Final Victory Neo Geo 1995-03-27 Neo Geo (MVS, AES), Neo Geo CD, Sega Saturn, Windows 95, PlayStation 2, Virtual Console, Nintendo Switch, Xbox One
Real Bout Fatal Fury Neo Geo 1995-12-20 Neo Geo (MVS, AES), Neo-Geo CD, Sega Saturn, PlayStation, PlayStation 2, PSN, Virtual Console, PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, Xbox One
Real Bout Fatal Fury Special Neo Geo 1997-01-21 Neo Geo (MVS, AES), Neo-Geo CD, Sega Saturn, PlayStation, Game Boy, PlayStation 2, PSN, Virtual Console, PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, Xbox One
Real Bout Fatal Fury 2: The Newcomers Neo Geo 1998-03-20 Neo Geo (MVS, AES), Neo-Geo CD, Neo Geo Pocket Color, PlayStation 2, Virtual Console, PlayStation 4, Nintendo Switch, Microsoft Windows, Xbox One
Real Bout Garou Densetsu Special: Dominated Mind PlayStation 1998-06-25 PlayStation, PSN
Fatal Fury: Wild Ambition Hyper Neo Geo 64 1999-01-28 Hyper Neo Geo 64, PlayStation, PSN
Fatal Fury: 1st Contact Neo Geo Pocket Color 1999-04-30 Neo Geo Pocket Color, Nintendo Switch
Garou: Mark of the Wolves Neo Geo 1999-11-26 Neo Geo (MVS, AES), Dreamcast, PlayStation 2, Xbox Live Arcade, iOS, PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita, Nintendo Switch, Microsoft Windows, Xbox One

Canon

Non-Canon

Compilations

Two compilations have been released:

Gameplay

The original Fatal Fury is known for the two-plane system. Characters fight from two different planes. By stepping between the planes, attacks can be dodged with ease. Later games have dropped the two-plane system, replacing it with a complex system of dodging, including simple half second dodges into the background and a three plane system. Characters have moves that can attack across the two planes, attack both planes at once, or otherwise attack dodge characters.

Later Fatal Fury games have experimented with various mechanical changes. "Ring-outs" allow a character to lose the round if the character is thrown into the edges of the fighting backdrop; single-plane backdrops, where dodging is eliminated altogether, causing moves that send opponents to the opposite plane to do collateral damage. The "Deadly Rave" is a super combo used by several characters, where after execution, a player had to press a preset series of buttons with exact timing for the entire combo to execute. The "Just Defend" is a type of protected block in which players regained lost life, did not wear down the player's guard crush meter and removed all block stuns making combo interruptions smoother.

Plot

Setting

Fatal Fury and its sister series, Art of Fighting, are set in the same fictional universe. Art of Fighting took place several years prior to the first Fatal Fury (this is established in Art of Fighting 2, which features a younger long-haired Geese Howard as the game's secret final boss and the true mastermind behind the events of the first Art of Fighting). The two series are set primarily in the same fictional city of "South Town".

Fatal Fury: Wild Ambition likewise features the cast from the series that are featured in The King of Fighters (KOF) series, with many of the more popular characters from Fatal Fury and Art of Fighting games transferred to The King of Fighters as they were introduced. The KOF series ignores the continuity established in the Fatal Fury/Art of Fighting games. This was done so that the characters from both series could be featured in the KOF games without having to age them.

Characters

Main article: List of Fatal Fury characters

As with most fighting games, the Fatal Fury series has an extensive cast of characters that increased with each installment. The three main heroes from the original game, Terry Bogard, Andy Bogard and Joe Higashi, appeared in each installment, along with female ninja Mai Shiranui. Some characters made appearances outside the series, particularly in The King of Fighters series and in Art of Fighting 2 (where a young Geese Howard appears as a hidden opponent). Likewise, characters from outside the series have appeared in the Fatal Fury games. Ryo Sakazaki from the Art of Fighting series makes an appearance in a hidden "dream match" in Fatal Fury Special, while his older self from Buriki One appears in Fatal Fury: Wild Ambition. Garou: Mark of the Wolves is the only Fatal Fury game not to feature any returning character with the exception of Terry Bogard himself, who was completely redesigned for the game.

Story

The Fatal Fury series chronicles the rise of "Lone Wolf" Terry Bogard (hence the Japanese title, which translates to Legend of the Hungry Wolf), and the simultaneous fall of the criminal empire of Geese Howard. Like many other SNK titles of the time, the first installment takes place in a fictitious American city called South Town. Brimming with violence and corruption, South Town forms the ideal backdrop for the annual The King of Fighters fighting tournament, organized by notorious crime lord Geese Howard. No fighter has ever managed to beat his right-hand man and appointed champion, Billy Kane, until Terry arrives.

The second installment of the series features Geese's half-brother, Wolfgang Krauser, who internationalizes the formerly local tournament in a bid to take on the world's strongest combatants. The tournament disappears from the storyline by the third game, having spun off into its own series. Instead, the third installment centers around Terry Bogard's attempts to stop Geese from obtaining an ancient scroll that would give him the powers of a lost and dangerous martial art form.

After the third game, the series was renamed to Real Bout Fatal Fury. In its first installment, the final and decisive battle is set between Terry and Geese. The King of Fighters tournament appears in this game. The second installment, which is named Real Bout Fatal Fury Special, features Wolfgang's return.

Garou: Mark of the Wolves takes place a generation later. It focuses on Rock Howard, Terry's protégé and son of Geese, who makes a shocking discovery about his past when he enters the tournament.

Development

This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (June 2016)

Series producers Takashi Nishiyama (since the original title)[2] and Hiroshi Matsumoto (since Fatal Fury 3), were the planners of the original Street Fighter (where they were credited as Piston Takashi and Finish Hiroshi). Matsumoto is also the creator of the Art of Fighting series.[3][4][5][6]

In other media

The Fatal Fury series inspired a trilogy of animated productions produced by NAS with SNK, featuring character designs by Masami Ōbari. The first is a television special that aired in 1992 on Fuji TV titled Fatal Fury: Legend of the Hungry Wolf (Battle Fighters Garou Densetsu), which adapts the plot of the first game. It was followed in 1993 by another television special Fatal Fury 2: The New Battle (Battle Fighters Garou Densetsu 2) based on the second game, which also aired on Fuji TV. A theatrically released film followed in 1994, titled Fatal Fury: The Motion Picture (Garou Densetsu: The Motion Picture), which features an original plot and new characters. The first two TV specials were released on a single laserdisc and later on DVD.

VIZ Communications picked up the license for the trilogy and produced English dubbed versions of each of them, releasing them straight to VHS, and later on DVD. They were later released subtitled, with the first two Fatal Fury specials released in one video titled Fatal Fury One-Two Punch. The subbed version of Fatal Fury 2 features a scene involving a rematch between Joe Higashi and Big Bear (Raiden) that was cut from the dubbed version. The English DVD release of the TV specials, Fatal Fury: Double Impact, features this scene. If chosen to be viewed with the English dub, it would temporarily go onto Japanese with English subtitles during this scene.

Many soundtracks, manga comics, other books, video tapes, and drama CDs have been released in Japan for the series as a whole[7] and for each of its individual entries.[8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16]

The fan film Fatal Fury: Mark of the Wolves was released on YouTube on February 10, 2021 starring Josh Mabie as Rock Howard (also as the director and of action design) and Christian Howard as Terry Bogard (also as the producer); these two also served as the writers and for co-fight choreography.[17]

Characters from Fatal Fury have gone on to make guest appearances in other fighting games such as Dead or Alive 5: Last Round, Tekken 7, Fighting EX Layer and Super Smash Bros. Ultimate.

References

  1. ^ "2005 KOF-party". SNK Playmore. Retrieved January 24, 2009.
  2. ^ Leone, Matt. "The Man Who Created Street Fighter". 1UP.com. Retrieved December 19, 2011.
  3. ^ "piston takashi list of games at arcade-history". Arcade-history.com. Retrieved July 15, 2010.
  4. ^ "takashi nishiyama list of games at arcade-history". Arcade-history.com. Retrieved July 15, 2010.
  5. ^ "Takashi Nishiyama". IMDb.
  6. ^ "Takashi Nishiyama". MobyGames. Retrieved July 15, 2010.
  7. ^ "Garou Densetsu (Series)". Arcade Gear. January 21, 1995. Archived from the original on June 1, 2016. Retrieved June 26, 2016.
  8. ^ "Garou Densetsu". Arcade Gear. November 25, 1991. Archived from the original on June 5, 2016. Retrieved June 26, 2016.
  9. ^ "Garou Densetsu 2". Arcade Gear. December 10, 1992. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved June 26, 2016.
  10. ^ "Garou Densetsu 3". Arcade Gear. March 27, 1995. Archived from the original on May 2, 2016. Retrieved June 26, 2016.
  11. ^ "Real Bout". Arcade Gear. Archived from the original on June 19, 2016. Retrieved June 26, 2016.
  12. ^ "Real Bout Special". Arcade Gear. Archived from the original on March 31, 2016. Retrieved June 26, 2016.
  13. ^ "Real Bout 2". Arcade Gear. Archived from the original on May 3, 2016. Retrieved June 26, 2016.
  14. ^ "Real Bout Special Dominated Mind". Arcade Gear. Archived from the original on June 1, 2016. Retrieved June 26, 2016.
  15. ^ "Garou Densetsu Wild Ambition". Arcade Gear. Archived from the original on May 17, 2016. Retrieved June 26, 2016.
  16. ^ "Garou Mark of the Wolves". Arcade Gear. November 26, 1999. Archived from the original on June 1, 2016. Retrieved June 26, 2016.
  17. ^ "Fatal Fury: Mark of the Wolves Live-Action Fan Film". YouTube. February 10, 2021. Archived from the original on 2021-12-12. Retrieved February 11, 2021.