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Foster-Miller, Inc
Company typePrivate
Founded1956
HeadquartersWaltham, Massachusetts
ProductsMilitary Robotics
RevenueUS$76,190,000 (2019)[1]
ParentQinetiq
SubsidiariesFoster-Miller Technologies[2]
WebsiteFoster Miller

Foster-Miller, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Qinetiq, is an American-based military robotics manufacturer. Its two best-known products are its TALON robots and its LAST Armor.

Founded and based in Waltham, Massachusetts, it has offices in Albany, New York,[2] Washington, D.C., and near Boston. Foster-Miller became a wholly owned Independent subsidiary of Qinetiq in 2004. Its parent has signed a special security agreement, allowing it to work independently in sensitive projects for US defense.[3]

Foster-Miller has about 300 members of staff skilled in aeronautical engineering, administration, chemical engineering, chemistry, physics, civil engineering, electrical engineering, mathematics, statistics, mechanical engineering, metallurgy, polymers, polymerization, electromechanical engineering.

Foster-Miller works in the fields of robotics, advanced materials, sensors, custom machinery, medical device design, biopharmaceuticals, C4ISR and transportation. It has been awarded the aerospace quality management standard AS9100 (6 January 2006) and SW-CMM Level 3 software certification (9 February 2006) and ISO 13485 for medical device design and development.

Mergers/acquisitions

On 8 September 2004 Foster-Miller was acquired by Qinetiq North America for $163 million US dollars. QinetiQ is an offshoot of the UK's DERA, which is Europe's largest science and technology company with a revenue of over $2.2 billion in the 2008 financial year. The acquisition was finalized on 9 November 2004, with Foster-Miller remaining an independent wholly owned subsidiary.

In August, 2005, Qinetiq bought Planning Systems Inc. Planning Systems Inc has some 350 employees with interest in diversified advanced technology.[4]

On 23 April 2007 Foster-Miller announced the acquisition of two Pittsburgh-based robotics companies, Applied Perception Inc. and Automatika Inc. for up to $9.2 million US dollars each [1][dead link]. Automatika provides design, system prototyping, and product manufacturing for robotic systems. Applied Perception creates standardized perception, planning, and control software for unmanned ground vehicles. [2][5]

History

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Foster-Miller associates was founded by MIT graduate students Eugene Foster and Al Miller, but when Miller left MIT and Foster-Miller associates he was replaced by Charles Kojabashian and Edward Nahikian. The trio went on to keep the Foster-Miller Associates name and in 1956 formally opened Foster-Miller Associates in Waltham, Massachusetts.

It is difficult to find information relating to Foster-Miller's earliest years, but its recent performance is well documented and quite extensive. Some of the earliest developments were in jet spray dispensers in vending machines and Velcro/Raychem (heat-shrink tubing) molding machines. They developed ballistic nets in the 1990s and an overhead/underground power line monitoring system, and underground piping and nuclear steam generator maintenance robots ("guided mole").

See also

References

  1. ^ "Foster-Miller, Inc. Company Profile". Dun & Bradstreet. 2019.
  2. ^ a b D'Errico, Richard A (2004-09-08). "Foster-Miller acquired". Albany Business Review. American City Business Journals. Retrieved 2021-01-14.
  3. ^ "QinetiQ enters next phase of growth in the US".
  4. ^ Press release: Qinetiq Announces Acquisition of Planning Systems Inc. Archived 2007-09-30 at the Wayback Machine
  5. ^ "Dragon Runner Reconnaissance Robot". Army Technology. Retrieved 2023-02-27.
  6. ^ NASA Technical Memorandum 100185 RE- 1000 Free-Piston Stirling Engine Hydraulic Output System Description p. 3
  7. ^ "QinetiQ announces its first US acquisition". QinetiQ. 2004-09-08. Retrieved 2020-01-14 – via Defense-Aerospace.com, Briganti et Associés.
  8. ^ Hambling, David (2004-07-15). "Police take a cue from Spider-Man". The Guardian. Retrieved 2021-01-14.