Karen Rolton
Personal information
Full nameKaren Louise Rolton
Born (1974-11-21) 21 November 1974 (age 46)
Adelaide, South Australia
BattingLeft-handed
BowlingLeft-arm medium
RoleBatter
International information
National side
Test debut (cap 127)28 February 1995 v New Zealand
Last Test10 July 2009 v England
ODI debut (cap 77)14 February 1995 v New Zealand
Last ODI5 July 2009 v England
ODI shirt no.21
T20I debut (cap 10)2 September 2005 v England
Last T20I25 June 2009 v England
Domestic team information
YearsTeam
1994/95–2010/11South Australia
Career statistics
Competition WTest WODI WT20I
Matches 14 141 15
Runs scored 1,002 4,814 405
Batting average 55.66 48.14 50.62
100s/50s 2/5 8/33 0/2
Top score 209* 154* 96*
Balls bowled 1,104 3,267 36
Wickets 14 85 3
Bowling average 23.35 20.81 12.33
5 wickets in innings 0 0 0
10 wickets in match 0 0 0
Best bowling 2/6 4/29 2/26
Catches/stumpings 9/– 25/– 6/–
Source: ESPNcricinfo, 2 January 2017

Karen Louise Rolton (born 21 November 1974) is an Australian former cricketer and captain of the national women's team. A left-handed batter, she has scored the most runs for her country in women's Test cricket.[1]

International cricket

After making her international debut in 1995, Rolton went on to become a member of two successful world championship campaigns.[2][3] In the final of the 2005 Women's Cricket World Cup, she scored 107 not out and was adjudged Player of the Match.[3] Her numerous individual honours include being named ICC Women's Cricketer of the Year in 2006 and winning the Belinda Clark Award four times.[4][5] New Zealand coach Steve Jenkin once remarked that the best tactic against her was to avoid dismissing the Australian team's openers so she could not bat.[6]

In 2006, Rolton became the captain of the national team, taking over from Belinda Clark.[7] She led Australia in the 2009 Women's Cricket World Cup on home soil, although the team performed below expectations and finished in fourth place.[8][9]

Records and statistics

Across 14 Test matches, Rolton scored 1,002 runs at an average of 55.66 which included two centuries and five half-centuries. She made her top score of 209 not out against England at Headingley in 2001, a world record at the time.[1] She also scored 4,814 runs at 48.14 in Women's One Day Internationals.[2] Rolton became the first player to score a century in the knockout stage of a Women's Cricket World Cup and set a record for the highest individual score on debut in Women's Twenty20 Internationals with 96 not out.[10][11][12] In addition to her batting prowess, she enjoyed success as a left-arm medium-pace bowler, taking 102 international wickets across all three formats.[2]

Retirement and post-career

In January 2010, Rolton announced her retirement from international cricket after a 14-year career.[13] She continued to play domestic cricket for South Australia until the end of the 2010–11 Women's National Cricket League season.[2]

In 2016, Rolton was inducted into the ICC Cricket Hall of Fame.[14] In January 2018, she was inducted into the Australian Cricket Hall of Fame.[15] A few months later, the South Australian Cricket Association unveiled a new community sporting facility in Adelaide, announcing the name of the main ground as Karen Rolton Oval.[16][17]

Rolton currently lives in Victoria and remains involved with cricket through her coaching roles at the Melbourne Renegades and also at local level.[18]

Honours

Team

Individual

References

Notes

  1. ^ a b "Player Profiles: Karen Rolton". Women's Cricket in Australia – Southern Stars. 2 May 2004. Archived from the original on 24 February 2007. Retrieved 11 March 2007.
  2. ^ a b c d "Karen Rolton". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 15 December 2006.
  3. ^ a b "Sublime Rolton guides Australia to fifth World Cup | ESPNcricinfo.com". www.espncricinfo.com. Retrieved 27 May 2020.
  4. ^ "Australian Cricket Awards | Cricket Australia". www.cricketaustralia.com.au. Retrieved 27 May 2020.
  5. ^ "Rolton wins Women's Player of the Year award | ESPNcricinfo.com". www.espncricinfo.com. Retrieved 27 May 2020.
  6. ^ "Rolton, Fitzpatrick notch one-day tons". thefanatics.com. 19 October 2006. Archived from the original on 22 September 2007. Retrieved 12 March 2007.
  7. ^ "Rolton pulls stumps on career". www.abc.net.au. 20 January 2010. Retrieved 27 May 2020.
  8. ^ "Rolton warns of pressures of a home World Cup". cricket.com.au. Retrieved 27 May 2020.
  9. ^ "A great advertisement for women's cricket | ESPNcricinfo.com". www.espncricinfo.com. Retrieved 27 May 2020.
  10. ^ "103 off 40 balls, 22 off one over". ESPNcricinfo. Archived from the original on 21 July 2017. Retrieved 21 July 2017.
  11. ^ "Records | Women's Twenty20 Internationals | Batting records | Most runs in debut match". ESPNcricinfo. Archived from the original on 2 July 2017. Retrieved 22 May 2017.
  12. ^ "Twenty20 Match: England Women v Australia Women at Taunton, Sep 2, 2005 | Cricket Scorecard". ESPNcricinfo. Archived from the original on 26 May 2017. Retrieved 22 May 2017.
  13. ^ "Karen Rolton retires from international cricket". ESPNcricinfo. 20 January 2010. Retrieved 2 December 2019.
  14. ^ "Karen Rolton inducted into ICC Hall of Fame". ESPNcricinfo. 24 November 2016. Archived from the original on 19 July 2019. Retrieved 19 July 2019.
  15. ^ "Latest Hall of Fame inductees revealed". cricket.com.au. Retrieved 27 May 2020.
  16. ^ "SACA unveils Karen Rolton Oval". South Australian Cricket Association. 8 March 2018. Archived from the original on 13 March 2018. Retrieved 13 March 2018.
  17. ^ "The Envy of Australian Cricket". The Advertiser. 7 March 2018. Archived from the original on 15 March 2018. Retrieved 13 March 2018.
  18. ^ "Game changer: Rolton's records leave lasting legacy". cricket.com.au. Retrieved 27 May 2020.

Further reading

Preceded byNew Award ICC Women's Cricketer of the Year2006 Succeeded byJhulan Goswami