This article may be expanded with text translated from the corresponding article in Russian. (January 2011) Click [show] for important translation instructions. View a machine-translated version of the Russian article. Machine translation like DeepL or Google Translate is a useful starting point for translations, but translators must revise errors as necessary and confirm that the translation is accurate, rather than simply copy-pasting machine-translated text into the English Wikipedia. Consider adding a topic to this template: there are already 2,547 articles in the main category, and specifying|topic= will aid in categorization. Do not translate text that appears unreliable or low-quality. If possible, verify the text with references provided in the foreign-language article. You must provide copyright attribution in the edit summary accompanying your translation by providing an interlanguage link to the source of your translation. A model attribution edit summary is Content in this edit is translated from the existing Russian Wikipedia article at [[:ru:Кульмский крест]]; see its history for attribution. You should also add the template ((Translated|ru|Кульмский крест)) to the talk page. For more guidance, see Wikipedia:Translation.
The Kulm Cross
The Kulm Cross
Leopold I of Belgium with the Kulm Cross
Leopold I of Belgium with the Kulm Cross

The Kulm Cross (German: Kulmer Kreuz; Russian: Күльмcкиӣ кpecт) was a Prussian award. It was a version of the badge of the Iron Cross. It was created on 4 December 1813 by Frederick William III of Prussia after the battle of Kulm. It was not awarded for any special act of courage or merit. Officers wore it in silver and NCOs and other ranks in metal. It was worn on the tunic, with no ribbon.

A Russian version of the order was completely identical in size and shape to the Prussian Order of the Iron Cross, differing only in that it had no date and monogram of the king. By awarding this cross 12,066 people were represented, but the reward could only be obtained by 7,131 soldiers who survived to 1816.

Recipients

Bibliography