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Prime Minister of Ethiopia
Name in national languages
  • Amharic:የኢትዮጵያ ጠቅላይ ሚኒስትር
    Ye-Ītyōṗṗyā t’ek’ilay mīnīsitir
    Oromo:Muummeen Ministiraa Itiyoophiyaa
    Somali:Raysal Wasaaraha Itoobiya
    Tigrinya:ቀዳማይ ሚኒስተር ኢትዮጵያ
    k’edamay minister Ítiyop'iya
    Afar:Itiyoppiya Naharsi Malak
Emblem of Ethiopia.svg
Emblem
Flag of Ethiopia.svg
Flag of Ethiopia
Abiy Ahmed with LI Yong 2018 (cropped).jpeg
Incumbent
Abiy Ahmed

since 2 April 2018
ResidenceMenelik Palace
AppointerPresident of Ethiopia
Term lengthNo term limit
Formation1909 (Chief Minister)
1943 (Prime Minister)
Deputy Deputy Prime Minister of Ethiopia
Salary3,600 USD annually[1]
WebsitePrime Minister Office - Ethiopia

The prime minister of Ethiopia is the head of government and chief executive of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia. The prime minister is the most powerful figure in Ethiopian politics and the commander-in-chief of the Ethiopian National Defense Force. The official residence of the prime minister is the Menelik Palace in Addis Ababa. Abiy Ahmed is the current fourth prime minister of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia.[2]

Ethiopia is a parliamentary republic with the president as head of state and the prime minister as head of government. The 1995 Constitution of Ethiopia explicitly vests executive power in the Council of Ministers and names the prime minister as chief executive, with the president limited to an almost entirely ceremonial role.[citation needed]

The prime minister is elected from the members of the House of People's Representatives.[3] The nominee then presents a government platform and must receive a vote of confidence in order to become prime minister. In practice, the prime minister is usually the leader of the largest party in the House of Peoples' Representatives.

Origins and history

The heads of government of Ethiopia have been chief ministers (1909–1943), and then prime ministers (1943–present). Since 1995 Ethiopia follows a Parliamentary system of government.

The prime minister's position is stronger on paper than his counterparts in other parliamentary systems fashioned after the Westminster system. In most other parliamentary systems, the head of state or his or her official representative (i.e., the monarch or president or governor-general) is nominal chief executive, but in practice is bound to act on the advice of the prime minister. Thus, the head of state de facto holds a purely ceremonial position, while the prime minister is the actual head of government, chief executive, and leading political figure. In Ethiopia, however, the prime minister is both de jure and de facto chief executive.[4]

The prime minister shall be selected from among members of the House of Peoples' Representatives.[5] The prime minister is expected to work with other ministers to ensure the passage of bills through the legislature.[citation needed]

Role and power of the prime minister

After each election, president of Ethiopia invites the leader of the majority party or the party with the highest number of seats in the House of Peoples' Representatives to form a government at the federal level and exercise its powers. In practice, the prime minister nominates the cabinet ministers.[citation needed]

1. The prime minister is the chief executive, the chairman of the Council of Ministers, and the commander-in-chief of the national armed forces.

2. The prime minister shall submit for approval to the House of Peoples' Representatives nominees for ministerial posts from among members of the two Houses or from among persons who are not members of either House and possess the required qualifications.

3. He shall follow up and ensure the implementation of laws, policies, directives, and other decisions adopted by the House of Peoples' Representatives.

4. He leads the Council of Ministers, coordinates its activities, and acts as its representative.

5. He exercices overall supervision over the implementation of policies, regulations, directives, and decisions adopted by the Council of Ministers.

6. He exercises overall supervision over the implementation of the country's foreign policy.

7. He selects and submits for approval to the House of Peoples' Representatives nominations for posts of Commissioners, the president and vice-president of the Federal Supreme Court and the Auditor General.

8. He supervises the conduct and efficiency of the federal administration and takes such corrective measures as are necessary.

9. He appoints high civilian officials of the federal government other than those referred to in sub-Articles 2 and 3 of this Article.

10. In accordance with law enacted or decision adopted by the House of Peoples' Representatives, he recommends to the president nominees for the award of medals, prizes and gifts.

11. He shall submit to the House of Peoples' Representatives periodic reports on work accomplished by the executive as well as on its plans and proposals.

12. He shall discharge all responsibilities entrusted to him by this constitution and other laws.

13. He shall obey and enforce the constitution.[5]

The prime minister, in consultation with the cabinet, schedules and attends the sessions of the Houses of Parliament and is required to answer the question from the Members of Parliament to them as the in-charge of the portfolios in the capacity as prime minister of Ethiopia. The prime minister represents the country in various delegations, high level meetings, and international organizations that require the attendance of the highest government office.[citation needed]

Deputy Prime Minister of Ethiopia (DPME)

Article 76 of the constitution states that The Council of Ministers comprises the Prime Minister, the Deputy Prime Minister, Ministers and other members as may be determined by law. On Article 75 of the constitution states DPME is responsible to the Prime Minister. The Deputy Prime Minister Carry out responsibilities which shall be specifically entrusted to him by the Prime Minister. The DPME (Deputy Prime Minister of Ethiopia) also act on behalf of the Prime Minister in his absence.

Security

The Ethiopian Republican Guard is tasked with protecting the prime minister.[6][7]

See also

References

  1. ^ Today, Latest Africa News, Headlines & Top Stories (5 November 2018). "African Leaders With The Lowest Salaries". Archived from the original on 22 March 2019.
  2. ^ "Prime Minister". The Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia’s Office of the Prime Minister. Retrieved 6 June 2019. H.E. Abiy Ahmed Ali (PhD) is the fourth Prime Minister of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia
  3. ^ Article 73(1) Constitution of the Federal Republic of Ethiopia
  4. ^ "Article 74(1) Constitution of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia". United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. 1995-08-21. Retrieved 2021-08-04.
  5. ^ a b Refugees, United Nations High Commissioner for. "Refworld | Constitution of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia". Refworld. Retrieved 2021-08-22.
  6. ^ [1] Archived February 8, 2015, at the Wayback Machine
  7. ^ "Ethiopia's Meles urges recognition of poll win". ethiomedia.com. 2010-05-25. Retrieved 2015-08-25.

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