Spring Street
 "6" train"6" express train
MTA NYC logo.svg New York City Subway station (rapid transit)
View of northbound platform
Station statistics
AddressSpring Street & Lafayette Street
New York, NY 10012
BoroughManhattan
LocaleLittle Italy, SoHo
Coordinates40°43′20″N 73°59′50″W / 40.72222°N 73.99722°W / 40.72222; -73.99722Coordinates: 40°43′20″N 73°59′50″W / 40.72222°N 73.99722°W / 40.72222; -73.99722
DivisionA (IRT)[1]
Line   IRT Lexington Avenue Line
Services   4 late nights (late nights)
   6 all times (all times) <6> weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction (weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction)
StructureUnderground
Platforms2 side platforms
Tracks4
Other information
OpenedOctober 27, 1904; 116 years ago (October 27, 1904)[2]
Station code409[3]
Opposite-
direction
transfer
No
Traffic
20193,754,272[5]Increase 2.7%
Rank132 out of 424[5]
Station succession
Next northBleecker Street: 4 late nights6 all times <6> weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction
Next southCanal Street: 4 late nights6 all times <6> weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction
Location
Spring Street station (IRT Lexington Avenue Line)
Spring Street station (IRT Lexington Avenue Line)
Spring Street station (IRT Lexington Avenue Line)
Track layout

Street map

Station service legend
Symbol Description
Stops all times Stops all times
Stops late nights only Stops late nights only
Stops rush hours in peak direction only Stops rush hours in the peak direction only

Spring Street is a local station on the IRT Lexington Avenue Line of the New York City Subway. Located at the intersection of Lafayette Street and Spring Street in SoHo and Little Italy, Manhattan, it is served by 6 trains at all times, <6> trains during weekdays in the peak direction, and 4 trains during late night hours.

The Spring Street station was constructed for the Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) as part of the city's first subway line, which was approved in 1900. Construction of the line segment that includes the Spring Street station started on September 12 of the same year. The station opened on October 27, 1904, as one of the original 28 stations of the New York City Subway. The station's platforms were lengthened in the late 1950s.

The Spring Street station contains two side platforms and four tracks; express trains use the inner two tracks to bypass the station. The station was built with tile and mosaic decorations, which are continued along the platform extensions. The station contains exits to Spring Street at the center of each platform. The platforms are not connected to each other within fare control. The station contains elevators from the street, which make it compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.

History

Construction and opening

Planning for the city's first subway line dates to the Rapid Transit Act, authorized by the New York State Legislature in 1894.[6]:139–140 The subway plans were drawn up by a team of engineers led by William Barclay Parsons, chief engineer of the Rapid Transit Commission. It called for a subway line from New York City Hall in lower Manhattan to the Upper West Side, where two branches would lead north into the Bronx.[7]:3 A plan was formally adopted in 1897, and legal challenges were resolved near the end of 1899.[6]:148 The Rapid Transit Construction Company, organized by John B. McDonald and funded by August Belmont Jr., signed Contract 1 with the Rapid Transit Commission in February 1900,[8] in which it would construct the subway and maintain a 50-year operating lease from the opening of the line.[6]:182 In 1901, the firm of Heins & LaFarge was hired to design the underground stations.[7]:4 Belmont incorporated the Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) in April 1902 to operate the subway.[6]:182

The Spring Street station was constructed as part of the IRT's original line, particularly the section from Chambers Street to Great Jones Street. Construction on this section of the line began on July 10, 1900, and was awarded to Degnon-McLean Contracting Company.[8] On July 12, 1900, the contract was modified to widen the subway at Spring Street to allow for the construction of 600 feet (183 m) of a fifth track.[9]:82, 249 The Spring Street station opened on October 27, 1904, as one of the original 28 stations of the New York City Subway from City Hall to 145th Street on the Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line.[6]:186[10]

Service changes and station renovations

A 1905 photo of the station's original glass ceilings, which let in natural light
A 1905 photo of the station's original glass ceilings, which let in natural light

After the initial system was completed in 1908,[11] the station was served by local trains along both the West Side (now the Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line to Van Cortlandt Park–242nd Street) and East Side (now the Lenox Avenue Line). West Side local trains had their southern terminus at City Hall during rush hours and South Ferry at other times, and had their northern terminus at 242nd Street. East Side local trains ran from City Hall to Lenox Avenue (145th Street).[12] In 1918, the Lexington Avenue Line opened north of Grand Central–42nd Street, thereby dividing the original line into an "H" system. All local trains were sent via the Lexington Avenue Line, running along the Pelham Line in the Bronx.[2]

In 1909, to address overcrowding, the New York Public Service Commission proposed lengthening platforms at stations along the original IRT subway.[13]:168 As part of a modification to the IRT's construction contracts, made on January 18, 1910, the company was to lengthen station platforms to accommodate ten-car express and six-car local trains. In addition to $1.5 million (equivalent to $41.7 million in 2020) spent on platform lengthening, $500,000 (equivalent to $13,887,500 in 2020) was spent on building additional entrances and exits. It was anticipated that these improvements would increase capacity by 25 percent.[14]:15 Platforms at local stations, such as the Spring Street station, were lengthened by between 20 to 30 feet (6.1 to 9.1 m). The northbound platform was extended to the south.[14]:107

In late 1959, contracts were awarded to extend the platforms at Bowling Green, Wall Street, Fulton Street, Canal Street, Spring Street, Bleecker Street, Astor Place, Grand Central–42nd Street, 86th Street, and 125th Street to 525 feet (160 m).[15] In April 1960, work began on a $3,509,000 project (equivalent to $30.7 million in 2020) to lengthen platforms at seven of these stations to accommodate ten-car trains. The northbound platforms at Canal Street, Spring Street, Bleecker Street, and Astor Place were lengthened from 225 to 525 feet (69 to 160 m); the platform extensions at these stations opened on February 19, 1962.[16]

Station layout

G Street level Entrances/exits
P
Platform level
Side platform
Northbound local "6" train"6" express train toward Pelham Bay Park or Parkchester (Bleecker Street)
"4" train toward Woodlawn late nights (Bleecker Street)
Northbound express "4" train"5" train do not stop here
Southbound express "4" train"5" train do not stop here →
Southbound local "6" train"6" express train toward Brooklyn Bridge (Canal Street)
"4" train toward New Lots Avenue late nights (Canal Street)
Side platform

Like other local stations, Spring Street has four tracks and two side platforms. The 6 stops here at all times,[17] rush-hour and midday <6> trains stop here in the peak direction;[17] and the 4 stops here during late nights.[18] The two express tracks are used by the 4 and 5 trains during daytime hours.[19] The platforms were originally 200 feet (61 m) long, as at other local stations on the original IRT,[7]:4[20]:8 but as a result of the 1959 platform extensions, became 525 feet (160 m) long.[15] The platform extensions are at the front ends of the original platforms: the southbound platform was extended southward and the northbound platform was extended northward.[20]:33 Both platforms are slightly curved.

Spring Street had a fifth center track at the time of its opening.[21][22] The track was intended as a storage siding and was 600 feet (183 m) long.[9]:82 This track did not last long; it was reportedly disconnected and removed in 1906, only two years after the subway opened. The trackway is now used as the location of a mechanical room.[22]

Design

Original name tablet mosaic, by Heins & LaFarge / Manhattan Glass Tile Company
Additional mosaic on the downtown platform extension
Small "S" cartouches, Atlantic Terra Cotta (1904)

As with other stations built as part of the original IRT, the tunnel is covered by a "U"-shaped trough that contains utility pipes and wires. The bottom of this trough contains a foundation of concrete no less than 4 inches (100 mm) thick.[20]:9 Each platform consists of 3-inch-thick (7.6 cm) concrete slabs, beneath which are drainage basins. The original platforms contain circular, cast-iron Doric-style columns spaced every 15 feet (4.6 m), while the platform extensions contain I-beam columns. Additional columns between the tracks, spaced every 5 feet (1.5 m), support the jack-arched concrete station roofs.[7]:4[20]:9 There is a 1-inch (25 mm) gap between the trough wall and the platform walls, which are made of 4-inch (100 mm)-thick brick covered over by a tiled finish.[20]:9

The original decorative scheme consists of blue tile station-name tablets, light blue tile bands, a white terracotta cornice, and light blue terracotta plaques. [20]:33 The mosaic tiles at all original IRT stations were manufactured by the American Encaustic Tile Company, which subcontracted the installations at each station.[20]:31 The decorative work was performed by tile contractor Manhattan Glass Tile Company and terracotta contractor Atlantic Terra Cotta Company.[20]:33 The ceilings of the original platforms and fare control areas contain plaster molding.[20]:10 The station has small "S" cartouches with two poppies from 1904, made by Atlantic Terra Cotta, and large mosaic tablets by Heins & LaFarge, also from 1904. Other small "S" and "Spring St" mosaics are newer.[22]

Where the platforms have been extended, the walls have green tiles and a darker green trim line with "SPRING ST" written on it in black sans serif font at regular intervals.

Exits

Stairs to downtown platform
Stairs to downtown platform

Spring Street has four entrances, two to each platform. The northbound entrances are at either eastern corner of Lafayette and Spring Streets, while the southbound entrances are at either western corner of the same intersection.[23]

In popular culture

This station is featured in the 2008 film Cloverfield. The scene was not filmed there, however.[24] The station is featured in the season 3 episode, "Lo-Fi", in the television show Criminal Minds.

References

  1. ^ "Glossary". Second Avenue Subway Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement (SDEIS) (PDF). 1. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. March 4, 2003. pp. 1–2. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 26, 2021. Retrieved January 1, 2021.
  2. ^ a b "Our Subway Open: 150,000 Try It; Mayor McClellan Runs the First Official Train". The New York Times. October 28, 1904. p. 1. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 21, 2020.
  3. ^ "Station Developers' Information". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved June 13, 2017.
  4. ^ "Facts and Figures: Annual Subway Ridership 2014–2019". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2020. Retrieved May 26, 2020.
  5. ^ a b "Facts and Figures: Annual Subway Ridership 2014–2019". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2020. Retrieved May 26, 2020.
  6. ^ a b c d e Walker, James Blaine (1918). Fifty Years of Rapid Transit — 1864 to 1917. New York, N.Y.: Law Printing. Retrieved November 6, 2016.
  7. ^ a b c d "Interborough Rapid Transit System, Underground Interior" (PDF). New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission. October 23, 1979. Retrieved November 19, 2019.
  8. ^ a b Report of the Board of Rapid Transit Railroad Commissioners for the City of New York For The Year Ending December 31, 1904 Accompanied By Reports of the Chief Engineer and of the Auditor. Board of Rapid Transit Railroad Commissioners. 1905. pp. 229–236.
  9. ^ a b Report of the Board of Rapid Transit Railroad Commissioners For And In The City of New York Up to December 31, 1901. Board of Rapid Transit Railroad Commissioners. 1902.
  10. ^ "Subway Opening To-day With Simple Ceremony – Exercises at One O'Clock – Public to be Admitted at Seven – John Hay May Be Present – Expected to Represent the Federal Government – President Roosevelt Sends Letter of Regret" (PDF). The New York Times. October 27, 1904. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved May 28, 2017.
  11. ^ "Our First Subway Completed At Last — Opening of the Van Cortlandt Extension Finishes System Begun in 1900 — The Job Cost $60,000,000 — A Twenty-Mile Ride from Brooklyn to 242d Street for a Nickel Is Possible Now". The New York Times. August 2, 1908. p. 10. Retrieved November 6, 2016.
  12. ^ Brooklyn Daily Eagle Almanac. Brooklyn Daily Eagle. 1916. p. 119.
  13. ^ Hood, Clifton (1978). "The Impact of the IRT in New York City" (PDF). Historic American Engineering Record. pp. 146–207 (PDF pp. 147–208). Retrieved December 20, 2020. This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.CS1 maint: postscript (link)
  14. ^ a b Report of the Public Service Commission for the First District of the State of New York For The Year Ending December 31, 1910. Public Service Commission. 1911.
  15. ^ a b Annual Report For The Year Ending June 30, 1959 (PDF). New York City Transit Authority. 1959. p. 9.
  16. ^ "4 IRT Stops To Open Longer Platforms". The New York Times. February 18, 1962. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 4, 2021.
  17. ^ a b "6 Subway Timetable, Effective September 13, 2020". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved December 9, 2020.
  18. ^ "4 Subway Timetable, Effective September 13, 2020". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved December 9, 2020.
  19. ^ Dougherty, Peter (2006) [2002]. Tracks of the New York City Subway 2006 (3rd ed.). Dougherty. OCLC 49777633 – via Google Books.
  20. ^ a b c d e f g h i Framberger, David J. (1978). "Architectural Designs for New York's First Subway" (PDF). Historic American Engineering Record. pp. 1-46 (PDF pp. 367-412). Retrieved December 20, 2020. This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.CS1 maint: postscript (link)
  21. ^ "Postcard: "Five track subway construction, Spring and Elm Streets, New York"". www.nycsubway.org. Retrieved October 25, 2018.
  22. ^ a b c Spring Street (IRT East Side Line)NYCSubway Retrieved August 30, 2008
  23. ^ "MTA Neighborhood Maps: Spring St (6)". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. April 2018. Retrieved December 25, 2020.
  24. ^ Cloverfield (2008)

Further reading