Super Robot Monkey Team Hyperforce Go!
GenreAction
Adventure
Comedy drama
Mecha
Science fiction
Superhero
Created byCiro Nieli
Directed by
Voices of
Opening theme
  • "Main Title Theme"
  • by Polysics
Ending theme"Main Title Theme"
(instrumental)
ComposerSebastian Evans II
Country of originUnited States
Japan
Original languagesEnglish
Japanese
No. of seasons4
No. of episodes52 (List of episodes)
Production
Executive producers
  • Ciro Nieli
  • Henry Gilroy (S1–2)
EditorTed Supa
Running time22 minutes
Production companiesWalt Disney Television Animation
(credited as Jetix Animation Concepts)[1]
Original release
NetworkJetix[2]
Toon Disney
ABC Family
ReleaseSeptember 18, 2004 (2004-09-18) –
December 16, 2006 (2006-12-16)

Super Robot Monkey Team Hyperforce Go![a] (also known as SRMTHFG or simply Super Robot Monkey Team) is an American-Japanese anime-influenced television series created by Ciro Nieli, one of the directors of Teen Titans, and the Showrunner and Executive Producer of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.[3] It is produced by Walt Disney Television Animation, with animation being done by The Answer Studio in Japan.[2] The series was the first original show produced for the Jetix block and for the Jetix and Disney channels worldwide, where the show premiered on September 18, 2004.[1] It ran for four seasons composed of 52 episodes, each 22 minutes long.[4]

Set on the fictional planet of Shuggazoom, the series follows the adventures of five cyborg monkeys and a human boy named Chiro as they work to protect their planet – and the rest of the universe – from the forces of evil.[5]

Plot

Main article: List of Super Robot Monkey Team Hyperforce Go! characters

The Super Robot Monkey Team is set in Shuggazoom City, a city that takes up a good portion of its planet, named Shuggazoom. The rest of the planet is divided into sparsely or entirely uninhabited zones. The largest of these making up the majority of the visible surface outside of Shuggazoom city is "The Zone of Wasted Years" which is a barren wasteland.

The main character is a boy named Chiro. When he was exploring the outskirts of the city, he stumbled upon a giant abandoned robot partially overgrown with plants but still accessible. Once inside, his curiosity got the better of him and he pulls an old power switch among a series of stasis tanks. In doing so, he awakened the five robotic monkeys that form the Super Robot Monkey Team Hyperforce. In the process Chiro also fused himself with the mysterious supernatural energy of the Power Primate, allowing him to transform into a stronger, braver fighter and the leader of the team. With the aid of the five Robot Monkeys: Sparx, Antauri, Gibson, Otto and Nova, their mission is to save Shuggazoom City from the evil Skeleton King, the main villain of the series, as well as any other evil forces that may threaten it.

Since Chiro was not born a superhero, or with any enhanced abilities, the five Robot Monkeys take up training him to hone his abilities which results in him leading the team. With each member possessing a different set of skills Chiro acts as a unifying force keeping them on point where they otherwise might fall to differing opinions, in addition to being familiar with the current culture of Shuggazoom. With the monkeys continuing to train Chiro he grows into the leader they need with the potential to fulfill his greater destiny as protector of the universe.

When fighting with larger enemies the Hyperforce uses the Super Robot, which can operate as a single entity or split into six separate vehicles for versatility. Its main attack, when combined as the whole robot, is Lasertron Fury. This powerful energy beam that is fired from its chest is capable of destroying large objects or hostile entities while an array of smaller weaponry is used to handle other lesser threats. The Super Robot also serves as Chiro and the Monkeys' headquarters and home while parked on its landing pad in Shuggazoom City.

Over the course of the series the history of both Shuggazoom and the Robot Monkeys is expanded upon revealing they were created long ago specifically to combat the evil Skeleton King by a brilliant inventor known only as the Alchemist. Having unintentionally released a great evil into the world with his experiments the Hyperforce was his attempt to prepare for an uncertain future where defenses would be needed. The Hyperforce itself also expanded as the series ran to include various allies and a rogues gallery of enemies as recurring characters.

Voice cast

Main article: List of Super Robot Monkey Team Hyperforce Go! characters

Main

Recurring

Episodes

Main article: List of Super Robot Monkey Team Hyperforce Go! episodes

Production

Super Robot Monkey Team Hyperforce Go! was created by director and producer Ciro Nieli.[21] In 2003, an executive from Disney accepted the project.

The series is influenced by Japanese animation.[22] It is also inspired by Star Trek, Super Sentai, Power Rangers, Voltron, and Star Wars. Animator and designer Lynne Naylor, who worked on Samurai Jack and Hi Hi Puffy AmiYumi, served as the art director. Her husband, Chris Reccardi, writer for Samurai Jack and The Powerpuff Girls was the assistant director. The art style was a tribute to classic anime, such as Speed Racer, Astro Boy, and Cyborg 009, and was influenced by the works of Ken Ishikawa, Go Nagai, Sanpei Shirato, Shotaro Ishinomori, and Osamu Tezuka. Other crew members include Tad Stones, who also worked on Buzz Lightyear of Star Command, Greg Weisman, creator of Gargoyles, Eric Trueheart, a writer for Invader Zim, Rich Fogel, a writer for Justice League and Pinky and the Brain, Chris Mitchell, who worked on SpongeBob SquarePants, and Kevin Hopps, who also worked on Animaniacs. Sebastian Evans composed the score of the show.[23][24] The theme song of Super Robot Monkey Team Hyperforce Go! is performed by Japanese synthpop/new wave band Polysics.[25]

Release

Broadcast

Super Robot Monkey Team Hyperforce Go! premiered on ABC Family's Jetix programming block on September 18, 2004.[26] It also aired on Toon Disney's Jetix block, until the Jetix programming block was taken off of ABC Family in August 2006, and the series began to air exclusively on Toon Disney. The show was planned to air on ABC Kids on September 17, 2005, but it was scrapped. It was shown on Jetix UK from January 1, 2005 until July 22, 2006. In 2005, Super Robot Monkey Team Hyperforce Go! aired on Champ TV in South Korea.[27] The entire series was broadcast in the United Kingdom on GMTV's Toonattik. In Ireland, it was released on RTÉ Two as part of "The Den" children's programming block. In 2007, the series was released on Mio TV in Singapore.[28]

The series was produced for widescreen, but originally shown cropped due to network restrictions.[29]

Home media

Super Robot Monkey Team Hyperforce Go! was later made available to stream on Disney+.[30]

It never got the season sets, but it did had 3 DVD discs with 1 episode that comes with the action figures, they got episodes "Flytor", "Lords of Soturix 7" and "Planetoid Q".[citation needed]

Reception

Critical response

Shreya Suresh Kumar of ComingSoon.net said, "This series has a perfect blend of humor, action, and sci-fi elements, making it an exciting experience. It features a stellar voice cast with Greg Cipes, Kevin Michael Richardson, Tom Kenny, and Kari Wahlgren. It is a series that appeals to everyone, from children to adults."[31] Charlotte Gorrell of MovieWeb stated, "It is a great series for the entire family, and a great introduction to science fiction for a young audience. At the same time, the humor in the one-liners appeals to a more adult audience. It uses the same personalities and eccentric imagery that are popular in anime. The futuristic world, mixed with a bright colors and a relatable protagonist, combines into a great family-friendly series."[32]

Accolades

The series was nominated for Best Sound Editing in Television Animated at the 2006 Golden Reel Awards.[33] It was nominated for Best Sound Editing in Sound Effects, Foley, Dialogue, ADR and Music for Television Animation at the 2007 Golden Reel Awards.[34]

Possible revival

In December 2014, across an interview with AnimeSuperhero.com, Ciro Nieli stated, "There’s a finale planned for that and I don’t know how I’m gonna do it but I swear that I’m gonna do it someday. I can do it as one movie or I can do it as a whole season, it just depends on how much breadth I want to give it. Look at the last episode. You can either pick it up from there or you can go ‘Five years later: it’s the war of the undead vs the robot chimps.’ It’s this crazy battlefield where all forces have kinda teamed up against the ultimate evil. It’d be awesome. It’s all figured out pretty much. Everyone bugs me about it all the time and I really wanna sit down and tell everybody what happens but I’d rather just make it someday and give it to them. Worst case scenario: before I die I’ll do a perfect graphic novel of it and then Disney can sue me posthumously ‘cause they now completely own it and that’s how it goes. I guess I could make a comic and change the names and hairdos…"[35] In June 2018, Greg Cipes shared one of Ciro Nieli’s concept art on Twitter, as it could be either a reboot or continuation for a fifth season, while showing off two new characters set to appear.[36] As of May 2024, there have been no updates about the shows revival.

In other media

Miscellaneous

References

  1. ^ Japanese: スーパー・ロボット・モンキー・チーム・ハイパーフォース GO!, Hepburn: Sūpā Robotto Monkī Chīmu Haipāfōsu GO!
  1. ^ a b "Jetix Europe - Disney co-production Super Robot Monkey Team Hyperforce Go! to launch at MIPCOM". Jetix Europe. 2004-08-18. Archived from the original on 2004-10-14. Retrieved 2019-07-08.
  2. ^ a b Desowitz, Bill (October 27, 2004). "Japan's New Answer Studio Builds on Animation's Past and Future". VFXWorld. Retrieved December 25, 2011.
  3. ^ Perlmutter, David (2018). The Encyclopedia of American Animated Television Shows. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 617–618. ISBN 978-1538103739.
  4. ^ Magee, Grace (January 7, 2023). "10 Amazing Cartoon Shows You Forgot Existed". Comic Book Resources. Retrieved 2023-09-21.
  5. ^ Gibson, Nathan P. (May 18, 2022). "The Staggering Number Of Villains You Probably Didn't Know Mark Hamill Voiced". Looper. Retrieved 2023-09-21.
  6. ^ "Voice Of Chiro – Behind The Voice Actors". Behind The Voice Actors. Check marks indicates role has been confirmed using screenshots of closing credits and other reliable sources((cite web)): CS1 maint: postscript (link)
  7. ^ "Voice Of Antauri – Behind The Voice Actors". Behind The Voice Actors. Check marks indicates role has been confirmed using screenshots of closing credits and other reliable sources((cite web)): CS1 maint: postscript (link)
  8. ^ "Voice Of Gibson – Behind The Voice Actors". Behind The Voice Actors. Check marks indicates role has been confirmed using screenshots of closing credits and other reliable sources((cite web)): CS1 maint: postscript (link)
  9. ^ "Voice Of Nova – Behind The Voice Actors". Behind The Voice Actors. Check marks indicates role has been confirmed using screenshots of closing credits and other reliable sources((cite web)): CS1 maint: postscript (link)
  10. ^ "Voice Of Otto – Behind The Voice Actors". Behind The Voice Actors. Check marks indicates role has been confirmed using screenshots of closing credits and other reliable sources((cite web)): CS1 maint: postscript (link)
  11. ^ "Voice Of Sparx – Behind The Voice Actors". Behind The Voice Actors. Check marks indicates role has been confirmed using screenshots of closing credits and other reliable sources((cite web)): CS1 maint: postscript (link)
  12. ^ "Voice Of Skeleton King – Behind The Voice Actors". Behind The Voice Actors. Check marks indicates role has been confirmed using screenshots of closing credits and other reliable sources((cite web)): CS1 maint: postscript (link)
  13. ^ "Voice Of Jinmay – Behind The Voice Actors". Behind The Voice Actors. Check marks indicates role has been confirmed using screenshots of closing credits and other reliable sources((cite web)): CS1 maint: postscript (link)
  14. ^ "Voice Of Mandarin – Behind The Voice Actors". Behind The Voice Actors. Check marks indicates role has been confirmed using screenshots of closing credits and other reliable sources((cite web)): CS1 maint: postscript (link)
  15. ^ "Voice Of Sorceress Valeena – Behind The Voice Actors". Behind The Voice Actors. Check marks indicates role has been confirmed using screenshots of closing credits and other reliable sources((cite web)): CS1 maint: postscript (link)
  16. ^ "Voice Of Lord Scrapperton – Behind The Voice Actors". Behind The Voice Actors. Check marks indicates role has been confirmed using screenshots of closing credits and other reliable sources((cite web)): CS1 maint: postscript (link)
  17. ^ "Voice Of Gyrus Krinkle – Behind The Voice Actors". Behind The Voice Actors. Check marks indicates role has been confirmed using screenshots of closing credits and other reliable sources((cite web)): CS1 maint: postscript (link)
  18. ^ "Voice Of Skeleton King Droid – Behind The Voice Actors". Behind The Voice Actors. Check marks indicates role has been confirmed using screenshots of closing credits and other reliable sources((cite web)): CS1 maint: postscript (link)
  19. ^ "Voice Of Commodore Game Master – Behind The Voice Actors". Behind The Voice Actors. Check marks indicates role has been confirmed using screenshots of closing credits and other reliable sources((cite web)): CS1 maint: postscript (link)
  20. ^ "Voice Of Alliana – Behind The Voice Actors". Behind The Voice Actors. Check marks indicates role has been confirmed using screenshots of closing credits and other reliable sources((cite web)): CS1 maint: postscript (link)
  21. ^ Inoa, Christopher (July 19, 2023). "Anime helped make Teen Titans one of the 2000s' most important shows". Polygon. Retrieved 2023-09-21.
  22. ^ "Jetix estrena nueva serie". Infobae (in European Spanish). October 13, 2017. Retrieved 2023-09-22.
  23. ^ Trumbore, Dave (February 18, 2017). "Composers Jake Monaco and Sebastian Evans on Their Craft". Collider. Retrieved 2023-09-22.
  24. ^ Freedman, Richard (November 14, 2016). "Teenage Mutant Teenage Turtles music to composer's ears". Daily Democrat. Retrieved 2023-09-22.
  25. ^ Verne, Michelle (February 17, 2010). "Technicolor pogo punk hits America". Daily Sundial. Retrieved 2023-09-21.
  26. ^ "Super Robot Monkey Team Hyperforce Go! (television)". D23. Retrieved 2023-09-21.
  27. ^ Baisley, Sarah (April 21, 2005). "Jetix Block To Premiere On New Animation Channel In South Korea". Animation World Network. Retrieved 2023-09-21.
  28. ^ DeMott, Rick (August 31, 2007). "Disney Brings Videos on Demand to Singapore". Animation World Network. Retrieved 2023-09-21.
  29. ^ Baisley, Sarah (February 10, 2006). "Super Robot Monkey Team Episodes Debut in Widescreen". Animation World Network. Retrieved 2023-09-21.
  30. ^
  31. ^ Kumar, Shreya Suresh (July 17, 2023). "Super Robot Monkey Team Hyperforce Go!: Where to Watch & Stream Online". ComingSoon.net. Retrieved 2023-09-21.
  32. ^ Gorrell, Charlotte (August 16, 2023). "15 American Animated TV Shows That Were Inspired by Japanese Anime". MovieWeb. Retrieved 2023-09-21.
  33. ^ "2006 Golden Reel Award Nominees & Recipients: Television". Motion Picture Sound Editors. Archived from the original on October 1, 2006. Retrieved October 1, 2006.
  34. ^
  35. ^ White, Grant (2014-12-05). "TMNT Exec. Producer Ciro Nieli Talks Ninja Turtles, Robot Monkeys, and the United Kingdom". AnimeSuperhero.com. Retrieved 2021-12-15.
  36. ^ Cipes, Greg [@GregCipes] (June 28, 2018). "There has been many world famous Italian Artist that have changed the world with their works. Geniuses like Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, Donatello and my favorite Italian master artist Ciro Nieli! Here Ciro (@superrobot74) is exploring something new with #srmthfg #cgi" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  37. ^ "Game Boy Advance Video: Super Robot Monkey Team Hyper Force Go! - Volume 1". Retrieved 2023-09-22.
  38. ^ "Game Boy Advance Video: Super Robot Monkey Team Hyper Force Go! - Volume 1 Release Information for Game Boy Advance - GameFAQs". GameFAQs. Retrieved 2023-09-22.
  39. ^ Raugust, Karen (March 9, 2006). "Toy Fair Trend: Opportunities for Animators". Animation World Network. Retrieved 2023-09-22.