Thomas B. Mills
Thomas Brooks Mills (1857–1930).png
35th Speaker of the Wisconsin State Assembly
In office
January 12, 1887 – January 5, 1891
Preceded byHiram Orlando Fairchild
Succeeded byJames J. Hogan
Member of the Wisconsin Senate
from the 11th district
In office
January 7, 1895 – January 2, 1899
Preceded byJohn T. Kingston
Succeeded byEdgar G. Mills
Member of the Wisconsin State Assembly
from the Jackson district
In office
January 5, 1885 – January 5, 1891
Preceded byRalza W. Button
Succeeded byJames J. McGillivray
Personal details
Born(1857-10-12)October 12, 1857
Manchester, Jackson County, Wisconsin, U.S.
DiedMarch 19, 1930(1930-03-19) (aged 72)
Clearwater, Florida, U.S.
Resting placeRiverside Cemetery, Black River Falls, Wisconsin
Political partyRepublican
OccupationBusinessman, politician

Thomas Brooks Mills (October 12, 1857 – March 19, 1930) was an American politician and businessman. He was the 35th Speaker of the Wisconsin State Assembly, and also served in the Wisconsin State Senate in the 1890s.

Biography

Born in the town of Manchester, Jackson County, Wisconsin, Mills went to the McMynn Academy in Racine, Wisconsin.[1] In 1890, Mills moved to West Superior, Wisconsin and was in the real estate and lumber business.[2]

He served in the Wisconsin State Assembly from 1885 to 1891 and was a Republican. He also served as speaker of the Wisconsin Assembly in 1887 and 1889.[3] From 1895 to 1899, Mills served in the Wisconsin State Senate.[2] While in the Wisconsin Legislature, Mills was able to help locate the Superior Normal School (now University of Wisconsin–Superior) in Superior, Wisconsin.

He served as grand exalted ruler of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks.[4][5]

Mills died suddenly in Clearwater, Florida on March 19, 1930.[1]

Notes

  1. ^ a b "Death of Thomas Brooks Mills". The Sheboygan Press. March 21, 1930. p. 1. Retrieved September 16, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  2. ^ a b The Blue Book of the State of Wisconsin. Secretary of State of Wisconsin. 1897. p. 662. Retrieved December 30, 2021 – via Google Books.
  3. ^ The Blue Book of the State of Wisconsin. Secretary of State of Wisconsin. 1889. p. 509. Retrieved December 30, 2021 – via Internet Archive.
  4. ^ "Nationally Known Elk, Well Known Here, Dies". The Daily Tribune. March 20, 1930. p. 1. Retrieved September 17, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  5. ^ "Racine Ready to Entertain Badger Elk Convention". The Post-Crescent. August 13, 1930. p. 21. Retrieved September 17, 2018 – via Newspapers.com. open access