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Vietnamese Fatherland Front
Mặt Trận Tổ Quốc Việt Nam
AbbreviationVFF or MTTQVN
ChairmanĐỗ Văn Chiến [vi]
FoundedFebruary 1977 (1977-02)
HeadquartersHanoi
IdeologyCommunism
Marxism–Leninism
Ho Chi Minh Thought
Vietnamese nationalism
National Assembly
496 / 496
The building of the Central Committee of Vietnamese Fatherland Front on Tràng Thi Street in Hanoi.
The building of the Central Committee of Vietnamese Fatherland Front on Tràng Thi Street in Hanoi.

The Vietnamese Fatherland Front (Vietnamese: Mặt Trận Tổ Quốc Việt Nam) is an umbrella group of mass movements in Vietnam aligned with the Communist Party of Vietnam forming the Vietnamese government. It was founded in February 1977 by the merger of the Vietnamese Fatherland Front of North Vietnam and two Viet Cong groups, the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam and the Alliance of National, Democratic, and Peace Forces. It is an amalgamation of many smaller groups, including the Communist Party itself. Other groups that participated in the establishment of the Front were the Vietnam General Confederation of Labour, the Ho Chi Minh Communist Youth Union (a.k.a. the Ho Chi Minh Youth) and the Ho Chi Minh Young Pioneer Organization. It also included the Democratic Party of Vietnam and Socialist Party of Vietnam, until they disbanded in 1988.[1] It also incorporates some officially sanctioned religious groups[example needed].[citation needed]

The Front is described by the Vietnamese government as "the political base of people's power." It is intended to have a significant role in society, promoting "national solidarity" and "unity of mind in political and spiritual matters." In practice, the members of the Front, like their counterparts in other Communist states, are largely subservient to the Communist Party, and must accept the party's "leading role" as a condition of their existence.[citation needed]

Many of the government's social programs are conducted through the Front. Recently, it has been given a role in programs to reduce poverty. The Front is also responsible for much of the government's policy on religion, and has the ability to determine which religious groups will receive official approval.[citation needed]

Perhaps more importantly, the Front is intended to supervise the activity of the government and of government organisations. Because the Front's power base is mass participation and popular mobilisation, it is seen as representative of the people, and both Vietnam's constitution and laws give it a special role. The Front has a particularly significant role in elections. Specifically, endorsement by the Front is generally required (in practice, if not in theory[citation needed]) to be a candidate for election. Almost all candidates are nominated by (and members of) the Front, with only a few "self-nominated" candidates avoiding the Front's veto. The Front's role in electoral nominations is mandated by law.[citation needed]

Leadership

Secretary General of the Vietnamese Fatherland Front since 1977:

Chairman of the Vietnamese Fatherland Front since 1977:

Former Front organisations

Tôn Đức Thắng giving the opening speech at the founding of the Vietnamese Fatherland Front in 1955.
Tôn Đức Thắng giving the opening speech at the founding of the Vietnamese Fatherland Front in 1955.

Electoral history

National Assembly elections

Election Votes % Seats +/– Position Role in government
1960
421 / 421
Increase 421 Increase 1st Sole legal coalition

under the control of CPV

1964 8,580,002 100%
366 / 366
Decrease 55 Steady 1st Sole legal coalition

under the control of CPV

1971
420 / 420
Increase 54 Steady 1st Sole legal coalition

under the control of CPV

1975 10,561,314 100%
424 / 424
Increase 4 Steady 1st Sole legal coalition

under the control of CPV

1976 22,895,611 100%
492 / 492
Increase 68 Steady 1st Sole legal coalition

under the control of CPV

1981 100%
496 / 496
Increase 4 Steady 1st Sole legal coalition

under the control of CPV

1987 100%
496 / 496
Steady Steady 1st Sole legal coalition

under the control of CPV

1992 37,195,592 100%
395 / 395
Decrease 101 Steady 1st Sole legal coalition

under the control of CPV

1997 43,185,756 100%
450 / 450
Increase 1 Steady 1st Sole legal coalition

under the control of CPV

2002 49,211,275 100%
498 / 498
Increase 1 Steady 1st Sole legal coalition

under the control of CPV

2007 100%
493 / 493
Decrease 5 Steady 1st Sole legal coalition

under the control of CPV

2011 61,965,651 100%
500 / 500
Increase 1 Steady 1st Sole legal coalition

under the control of CPV

2016 67,049,091 100%
494 / 494
Decrease 6 Steady 1st Sole legal coalition

under the control of CPV

References

  1. ^ Van, Dang. "The Rebirth of the Democratic Party of Vietnam and a basic principle of constitutionalism". newsgroups.derkeiler.com. derkeiler. Archived from the original on April 2, 2015. Retrieved 4 March 2015.