WCW World Tag Team Championship
Details
PromotionNWA/JCP
(1975–1988)
WCW
(1988–2001)
WWF
(2001)
Date establishedJanuary 29, 1975
Date retiredNovember 18, 2001 (unified with the WWF Tag Team Championship)
Other name(s)
  • NWA World Tag Team Championship
    (Mid-Atlantic)
    (1975–1991)
  • WCW World Tag Team Championship
    (WCW)
    (1991–2001)
  • WCW/nWo World Tag Team Championship
    (WCW)
    (1998)
  • WCW Tag Team Championship
    (WWF)
    (2001)
Statistics
First champion(s)The Minnesota Wrecking Crew
(Gene and Ole Anderson)
Final champion(s)The Dudley Boyz
(Bubba Ray Dudley and D-Von Dudley)
Most reignsAs Tag Team (10 reigns):

As Individual (11 reigns):

Longest reignDoom
(Butch Reed and Ron Simmons)
(282 days)
Shortest reignThe Misfits In Action
(Cpl. Cajun and Lt. Loco)
(<30 min)[1]
Oldest championDiamond Dallas Page
(44 years, 256 days)
Youngest championDavid Flair
(20 years, 304 days)
Heaviest championScott Hall and The Giant
(728 lb (330 kg) combined)
Lightest championRey Mysterio and Juventud Guerrera
(330 lb (150 kg) combined)

The WCW World Tag Team Championship, originally known as the NWA World Tag Team Championship (Mid-Atlantic version), was a professional wrestling world tag team championship in World Championship Wrestling (WCW) and later the World Wrestling Federation (WWF, now WWE). It was the original world tag team title of WCW and remained active until it was unified with the WWF Tag Team Championship.

History

Main article: List of WCW World Tag Team Champions

The WCW World Tag Team Championship was originally created as the NWA World Tag Team Championship of Mid-Atlantic Championship Wrestling (MACW) run by Jim Crockett Promotions (JCP). Following the title's introduction in 1975, the Minnesota Wrecking Crew became the inaugural champions on January 29. The title was renamed the WCW World Tag Team Championship in 1991 when Ted Turner bought JCP and it became World Championship Wrestling. Despite the title's name in MACW, the National Wrestling Alliance (NWA) did not recognize its own NWA World Tag Team Championship until 1992, when the NWA held a tournament to crown the first tag team recognized by all of the NWA territories. Terry Gordy and Steve Williams won the tournament.[2] As a result of Gordy and Williams being the WCW World Tag Team Champions when they became NWA World Tag Team Champions, both titles were defended together until WCW left the NWA in September 1993. On January 17, 2008, the NWA withdrew its recognition of every WCW World Tag Team Champion linked to the NWA World Tag Team Championship, officially stating that their titles were formed in 1995.

In March 2001, the World Wrestling Federation (WWF) purchased WCW. Soon after, The Invasion took place in which The Alliance (an alliance between WCW and ECW) was formed to fight against the WWF. During this time, the title was referred to as the WCW Tag Team Championship. At SummerSlam, the WCW Tag Team Champions Kane and The Undertaker defeated Chris Kanyon and Diamond Dallas Page for the WWF Tag Team Championship in a steel cage match to unify the two titles for the first time ever. Both titles remained independently active during this reign, with Kane and The Undertaker first losing the WWF Tag Team Championship to The Dudley Boyz (Bubba Ray Dudley and D-Von Dudley) on the September 17 episode of Raw, followed by the loss of the WCW Tag Team Championship to Booker T and Test on the September 25 episode of SmackDown!. At Survivor Series, the WCW Tag Team Champions The Dudley Boyz defeated the WWF Tag Team Champions The Hardy Boyz (Jeff Hardy and Matt Hardy) in a steel cage unification match. The WCW Tag Team Championship was then retired with WWE (the former WWF) officially recognizing The Dudley Boyz as the final champions.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ This excludes the reigns of the Fabulous Freebirds in 1991 and the Nasty Boys in 1995, which both technically ended before they began due to them winning the titles on a live show, and losing them on a taped show that was filmed before the live show but broadcast after.
  2. ^ Royal Duncan & Gary Will (2006). Wrestling Title Histories (4th ed.). Archeus Communications. ISBN 0-9698161-5-4.