1969 Chicago Cubs
Finished 2nd in NL East
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s)Philip K. Wrigley
General manager(s)John Holland
Manager(s)Leo Durocher
Local televisionWGN-TV
(Jack Brickhouse, Lloyd Pettit)
Local radioWGN
(Vince Lloyd, Lou Boudreau)
StatsESPN.com
BB-reference
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The 1969 Chicago Cubs season was the 98th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 94th in the National League and the 54th at Wrigley Field. The season involved the Cubs gaining renown as "the most celebrated second-place team in the history of baseball."[1] In the first season after the National League was split into two divisions, the Cubs finished with a record of 92–70, 8 games behind the New York Mets in the newly established National League East. Caustic 64-year-old Leo Durocher was the Cubs manager. The ill-fated season saw the Cubs in first place for 155 days, until mid-September when they lost 17 out of 25 games.

Offseason

The new National League

Further information: 1969 New York Mets season

With further expansion to the league, the 1969 season marked the first year of divisional play in Major League Baseball. The Atlanta Braves (along with the Cincinnati Reds) were placed in the NL West division, despite being located further east than the 2 westernmost teams in the NL East Division, the Cubs and St. Louis Cardinals. This was because the New York Mets wanted to be in the same division as the reigning power in the NL, which was the Cardinals at the time (to compensate for playing against the Dodgers and Giants fewer times each season). The Cubs consequently demanded to be in the NL East as well in order to continue playing in the same division as the Cardinals, one of the Cubs' biggest rivals. A side effect of this alignment is that it set the stage for what is considered one of the greatest pennant races – and comebacks in such a race – in MLB history.

Notable transactions

Regular season

Season summary

Hoping to improve on the previous year's 84–78 record, the Cubs began the 1969 season by winning 11 of their first 12 games, and on August 16, they were 75–44, up by a season high nine games over second place New York. By September 2, they had soared to an 84–52 record, well on pace to exceed the previous season's mark, but their lead over the Mets had fallen to five games. From there the Mets went on a tear. The Cubs ultimately lost 17 of the last 25 games of the season, while the Mets went 23–7 to overtake the Cubs and finish eight games ahead of them. It was one of the most astounding late season collapses in history, with the seventeen-game turnaround being one of the biggest ever. The Cubs finished 92–70, while the Mets won the National League East and would go on to win the World Series.

Summer of '69

Throughout the summer of 1969, led by future Hall of Famers Ernie Banks, Ferguson Jenkins, Ron Santo, Billy Williams, and the game calling skills of Randy Hundley behind the plate, the Chicago Cubs had built a substantial lead in the newly created National League East. At the conclusion of each victory 3rd baseman Santo would jump and click his heels in celebration. After starting pitcher Ken Holtzman's no-hitter on August 19, the Cubs led the division by 8+12 games over the St. Louis Cardinals and 9+12 games over the New York Mets.

The Rise

The 1969 season was bookended by a pair of homers that were memorable in a good and bad way respectively. On opening day at Wrigley Field, April 8, the Cubs trailed the Phillies 6–5 in the bottom of the 11th inning. With a runner on base, Willie Smith hit a game-winning home run into the right field bleachers.[5] This event essentially "lit the fuse" to the Cubs' successful first five months of the season. They would win the next three games, and 11 out of their first 12, and create a cushion that would extend to 8+12 games in mid-August.

The Fall

After the game of September 2, the Cubs' record was 84–52 with the Mets in second place at 77–55. But then a losing streak began just as a Mets winning streak was beginning. The Cubs lost the final game of a series at Cincinnati, then came home to play the resurgent Pittsburgh Pirates (who would finish in third place). After losing the first two games by scores of 9–2 and 13–4, the Cubs led going into the ninth inning in the series finale. A win would be a positive springboard since the Cubs were to play a crucial series with the Mets the very next day. But Willie Stargell drilled a 2-out, 2-strike pitch from the Cubs' ace reliever, Phil Regan, onto Sheffield Avenue to tie the score in the top of the ninth. The Cubs would lose 7–5 in extra innings.[6] Meanwhile, the Mets had taken two of three against Philadelphia over the same weekend.

Burdened by a four-game losing streak, the Cubs traveled to Shea Stadium on September 8 for a short two-game set. The Mets won both games, and the Cubs left New York with a record of 84–58 just 12 game in front. Disaster followed in Philadelphia, as a 99-loss Phillies team nonetheless defeated the Cubs twice, to extend Chicago's losing streak to eight games. In a key play in the second game, on September 11, Cubs starter Dick Selma threw a surprise pickoff attempt to third baseman Ron Santo, who was nowhere near the bag or the ball. Selma's throwing error opened the gates to a Phillies rally.

After that second Philly loss, the Cubs were 84–60 and the Mets had pulled ahead at 85–57. The Mets would not look back. The Cubs' eight-game losing streak finally ended the next day in St. Louis, but the Mets were in the midst of a ten-game winning streak, and the Cubs, wilting from team fatigue, generally deteriorated in all phases of the game.[1] The Mets (who had lost a record 120 games in their inaugural season 7 years earlier), would go on to win the World Series. The Cubs, despite a respectable 92–70 record, would be remembered for having lost a remarkable 17+12 games in the standings to the Mets in the last quarter of the season.

Bad luck

Banks stated, however, that after an error by Young, Santo "went crazy. Young was so upset, he ran out ... I had never seen something so hurtful". According to Banks, "They say one apple can spoil the whole barrel, and I saw that", with the incident dividing the team into factions.[7] The Book Baseball Hall of Shame 2 places the blame squarely (and perhaps unfairly) at the feet of one man, stating, "In the heat of battle, Leo Durocher, field general of the Cubs, went AWOL once too often. It was because of his lack of leadership that his team lost the fight for the 1969 pennant." Durocher did not believe in using the platoon system. He believed in putting his best eight players on the field every day.[8] Five of the Cubs' regular players finished the season with over 150 games played.[9] Two more had more than 130 games played.[9] In his book, The Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract, baseball historian Bill James cited manager Durocher's method of using his regular players everyday without any rest days as a factor in the Cubs' collapse.[10]

Overuse of the pitching staff may have played a part. During the first 118 games (74–43 record on August 13), the Cubs averaged about 4.7 runs a game and gave up only 3.5 runs per game, a 1.2 run per game advantage over the opposition. The last 45 games (18–27 record) saw a major reversal, with 3.7 runs per game for the team and 4.5 runs per game for the opposition (average Cub score would be a negative −0.8 runs per game versus opponents, almost a complete reversal from earlier play). Both the hitters and pitchers may have wilted as the season wound down.

Perhaps most ominously, during one of the Cubs' games against the Mets, a black cat ran onto the field near Santo, and after the cat appeared, the Cubs' collapse began. This only fueled the myth of the Curse of the Billy Goat for many years afterwards.

Season standings

NL East W L Pct. GB Home Road
New York Mets 100 62 0.617 52–30 48–32
Chicago Cubs 92 70 0.568 8 49–32 43–38
Pittsburgh Pirates 88 74 0.543 12 47–34 41–40
St. Louis Cardinals 87 75 0.537 13 42–38 45–37
Philadelphia Phillies 63 99 0.389 37 30–51 33–48
Montreal Expos 52 110 0.321 48 24–57 28–53

Record vs. opponents


Sources: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12]
Team ATL CHC CIN HOU LAD MON NYM PHI PIT SD SF STL
Atlanta 3–9 12–6 15–3 9–9 8–4 4–8 6–6 8–4 13–5 9–9 6–6
Chicago 9–3 6–6–1 8–4 6–6 10–8 8–10 12–6 7–11 11–1 6–6 9–9
Cincinnati 6–12 6–6–1 9–9 10–8 8–4 6–6 10–2 5–7 11–7 10–8 8–4
Houston 3–15 4–8 9–9 6–12 11–1 10–2 8–4 3–9 10–8 10–8 7–5
Los Angeles 9–9 6–6 8–10 12–6 10–2 4–8 8–4 8–4 12–6 5–13 3–9
Montreal 4–8 8–10 4–8 1–11 2–10 5–13 11–7 5–13 4–8 1–11 7–11
New York 8–4 10–8 6–6 2–10 8–4 13–5 12–6 10–8 11–1 8–4 12–6
Philadelphia 6-6 6–12 2–10 4–8 4–8 7–11 6–12 10–8 8–4 3–9 7–11
Pittsburgh 4–8 11–7 7–5 9–3 4–8 13–5 8–10 8–10 10–2 5–7 9–9
San Diego 5–13 1–11 7–11 8–10 6–12 8–4 1–11 4–8 2–10 6–12 4–8
San Francisco 9–9 6–6 8–10 8–10 13–5 11–1 4–8 9–3 7–5 12–6 3–9
St. Louis 6–6 9–9 4–8 5–7 9–3 11–7 6–12 11–7 9–9 8–4 9–3


Notable transactions

Draft picks

Roster

1969 Chicago Cubs
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders

Other batters

Manager

Coaches

Game log

1969 Game Log (92–70)
April: 16–7 (Home: 7–2 ; Away: 9–5)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
1 April 8 Phillies 7 – 6 11 Regan (1–0) Lersch (0–1) 40,796 1–0
2 April 9 Phillies 11–3 Hands (1–0) Wise (0–1) 6,297 2–0
3 April 10 Phillies 6–2 Holtzman (1–0) Fryman (0–1) 5,422 3–0
4 April 11 Expos 1 – 0 12 Abernathy (1–0) Sembera (0–1) 7,281 4–0
5 April 12 Expos 7–3 Grant (1–0) Jenkins (0–1) Sembera (2) 28,599 4–1
6 April 13 Expos 7–6 Regan (2–0) Stoneman (0–2) 27,664 5–1
7 April 14 Pirates 4–0 Holtzman (2–0) Veale (1–1) 3,114 6–1
8 April 15 Pirates 7–4 Aguirre (1–0) Ellis (1–1) Abernathy (1) 4,362 7–1
9 April 16 @ Cardinals 1–0 Jenkins (1–1) Carlton (1–1) 16,418 8–1
10 April 17 @ Cardinals 3–0 Hands (2–0) Giusti (1–1) Regan (1) 11,350 9–1
11 April 19 @ Expos 6 – 5 11 Regan (3–0) Shaw (1–2) 16,005 10–1
12 April 20 @ Expos 6–3 Jenkins (2–1) Morton (0–1) N/A 11–1
13 April 20 @ Expos 4–2 Wegener (1–0) J. Niekro (0–1) McGinn (1) 28,025 11–2
14 April 22 @ Pirates 7–5 Hartenstein (1–0) Hands (2–1) N/A 11–3
15 April 22 @ Pirates 6–5 Dal Canton (2–0) Nye (0–1) Kline (2) 7,906 11–4
16 April 24 Cardinals 3–2 Giusti (2–1) Holtzman (2–1) 11,656 11–5
17 April 25 @ Mets 3–1 Jenkins (3–1) Seaver (1–2) 18,548 12–5
18 April 26 @ Mets 9–3 Hands (3–1) Cardwell (0–3) 16,252 13–5
19 April 27 @ Mets 8–6 Regan (4–0) Koonce (0–2) N/A 14–5
20 April 27 @ Mets 3–0 McGraw (2–0) Nye (0–2) 37,437 14–6
21 April 28 @ Phillies 2 – 1 10 Abernathy (2–0) Wise (2–2) 4,438 15–6
22 April 29 @ Phillies 10–0 Jenkins (4–1) Jackson (2–2) 3,811 16–6
23 April 30 @ Phillies 3–1 Fryman (3–1) Hands (3–2) 2,930 16–7
May: 16–9 (Home: 9–4 ; Away: 7–5)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
24 May 2 Mets 6–4 Holtzman (3–1) Gentry (2–1) Regan (2) 14,702 17–7
25 May 3 Mets 3–2 Regan (5–0) Koonce (0–3) Abernathy (2) 23,228 18–7
26 May 4 Mets 3–2 Seaver (3–2) Hands (3–3) N/A 18–8
27 May 4 Mets 3–2 McGraw (3–0) Selma (2–3) 40,484 18–9
28 May 6 Dodgers 7–1 Holtzman (4–1) Sutton (3–3) 7,253 19–9
29 May 7 Dodgers 4 – 2 12 Brewer (1–1) Jenkins (4–2) McBean (2) 9,747 19–10
30 May 9 Giants 11–1 Bolin (2–2) Hands (3–4) Gibbon (2) 5,189 19–11
31 May 11 Giants 8–0 Holtzman (5–1) Sadecki (2–4) 18,572 20–11
32 May 12 Padres 2–0 Jenkins (5–2) Ross (1–2) 3,887 21–11
33 May 13 Padres 19–0 Selma (3–3) Kelley (2–3) 5,080 22–11
34 May 14 Padres 3–2 Nottebart (1–0) Podres (3–3) 9,622 23–11
35 May 16 @ Astros 11–0 Holtzman (6–1) Dierker (5–4) 17,053 24–11
36 May 17 @ Astros 5–4 Wilson (3–4) Nottebart (1–1) Gladding (5) 18,307 24–12
37 May 18 @ Astros 6–5 Ray (1–0) Regan (5–1) Gladding (6) 13,126 24–13
38 May 20 @ Dodgers 7–0 Holtzman (7–1) Sutton (4–4) 21,266 25–13
39 May 21 @ Dodgers 3–1 Osteen (6–2) Hands (3–5) 16,688 25–14
40 May 22 @ Dodgers 3–0 Jenkins (6–2) Singer (5–4) 17,974 26–14
41 May 23 @ Padres 6–0 Selma (4–3) Ross (1–4) 7,936 27–14
42 May 24 @ Padres 7–5 Abernathy (3–0) Kelley (2–4) Regan (3) 4,432 28–14
43 May 25 @ Padres 10–2 Podres (4–3) Nye (0–3) N/A 28–15
44 May 25 @ Padres 1–0 Abernathy (4–0) J. Niekro (1–3) 13,115 29–15
45 May 27 @ Giants 5–4 Linzy (2–1) Regan (5–2) Herbel (1) 6,608 29–16
46 May 28 @ Giants 9–8 Holtzman (8–1) Robertson (1–1) Regan (4) 4,447 30–16
47 May 30 Braves 2–0 Hands (4–5) Reed (5–3) 36,075 31–16
48 May 31 Braves 3–2 Jenkins (7–2) P. Niekro (7–4) 29,778 32–16
June: 18–11 (Home: 13–4 ; Away: 5–7)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
49 June 1 Braves 13–4 Selma (5–3) Jarvis (5–3) 24,349 33–16
50 June 3 Astros 4–2 Hands (5–5) Lemaster (3–7) 8,320 34–16
51 June 4 Astros 5–4 Jenkins (8–2) Griffin (2–3) 13,360 35–16
52 June 6 Reds 14–8 Holtzman (9–1) Cloninger (3–7) Regan (5) 22,185 36–16
53 June 7 Reds 5–5 25,514 36–16
54 June 9 Reds 4–1 Culver (4–4) Jenkins (8–3) Granger (6) 14,879 36–17
55 June 10 @ Braves 3–1 Holtzman (10–1) Reed (5–5) Regan (6) 27,007 37–17
56 June 11 @ Braves 5–1 P. Niekro (10–4) Hands (5–6) 28,707 37–18
57 June 12 @ Braves 12–6 Selma (6–3) Hill (0–1) Abernathy (3) 27,671 38–18
58 June 13 @ Reds 14 – 8 10 Regan (6–2) Pena (1–1) Nye (1) 17,134 39–18
59 June 14 @ Reds 9 – 8 10 Regan (7–2) Granger (1–2) Jenkins (1) 16,008 40–18
60 June 15 @ Reds 7–6 Carroll (8–3) Regan (7–3) N/A 40–19
61 June 15 @ Reds 5 – 4 * Nye (1–3) Arrigo (0–1) Johnson (2) 26,511 41–19
62 June 16 @ Pirates 9–8 Dal Canton (4–0) Regan (7–4) Blass (1) 8,810 41–20
63 June 17 @ Pirates 1–0 Veale (4–7) Jenkins (8–4) Dal Canton (3) N/A 41–21
64 June 17 @ Pirates 4–3 Blass (7–3) Abernathy (4–1) 26,817 41–22
65 June 18 @ Pirates 3 – 2 10 Gibbon (2–3) Regan (7–5) 12,198 41–23
66 June 20 Expos 2–0 Hands (6–6) Robertson (1–4) 18,890 42–23
67 June 21 Expos 3–2 Reed (2–1) Jenkins (8–5) Shaw (1) 33,750 42–24
68 June 22 Expos 7–6 Selma (7–3) Shaw (1–5) N/A 43–24
69 June 22 Expos 5 – 4 6 Face (4–1) Reynolds (0–1) McGinn (2) 22,079 43–25
70 June 23 Pirates 5–4 Regan (8–5) Dal Canton (5–1) 12,500 44–25
71 June 24 Pirates 3–2 Hands (7–6) Bunning (6–5) 17,530 45–25
72 June 25 Pirates 5–2 Jenkins (9–5) Veale (4–8) 26,434 46–25
73 June 26 Pirates 7 – 5 10 Regan (9–5) Dal Canton (5–2) 29,473 47–25
74 June 27 Cardinals 3–1 Carlton (8–5) Holtzman (10–2) 29,224 47–26
75 June 28 Cardinals 3–1 Hands (8–6) Giusti (3–7) 29,285 48–26
76 June 29 Cardinals 3–1 Jenkins (10–5) Gibson (10–5) N/A 49–26
77 June 29 Cardinals 12–1 Selma (8–3) Grant (4–8) 41,060 50–26
78 June 30 @ Expos 5–2 Reed (3–1) Lemonds (0–1) McGinn (3) 12,508 50–27
July: 15–14 (Home: 8–7 ; Away: 7–7)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
79 July 1 @ Expos 11–4 Renko (1–1) Holtzman (10–3) Face (4) 19,858 50–28
80 July 2 @ Expos 4–2 Hands (9–6) Stoneman (4–11) 16,101 51–28
81 July 3 @ Expos 8–4 Selma (9–3) Wegener (3–6) Regan (7) 12,194 52–28
82 July 4 @ Cardinals 3 – 1 10 Jenkins (11–5) Gibson (10–6) 28,177 53–28
83 July 5 @ Cardinals 5–1 Briles (7–7) Holtzman (10–4) 35,767 53–29
84 July 6 @ Cardinals 4–2 Carlton (10–5) Hands (9–7) Hoerner (9) N/A 53–30
85 July 6 @ Cardinals 6–3 Taylor (1–0) Nye (1–4) 48,294 53–31
86 July 8 @ Mets 4–3 Koosman (6–5) Jenkins (11–6) 37,278 53–32
87 July 9 @ Mets 4–0 Seaver (14–3) Holtzman (10–5) 50,709 53–33
88 July 10 @ Mets 6–2 Hands (10–7) Gentry (8–7) 36,012 54–33
89 July 11 Phillies 7–5 Boozer (1–0) Abernathy (4–2) Wilson (4) 24,509 54–34
90 July 12 Phillies 7–4 Jenkins (12–6) Wise (6–7) Regan (8) 26,732 55–34
91 July 13 Phillies 6–0 Holtzman (11–5) Fryman (8–6) N/A 56–34
92 July 13 Phillies 6–4 Colborn (1–0) Palmer (1–4) Nye (2) 34,913 57–34
93 July 14 Mets 1–0 Hands (11–7) Seaver (14–4) Regan (9) 37,473 58–34
94 July 15 Mets 5–4 Gentry (9–7) Selma (9–4) Taylor (8) 38,608 58–35
95 July 16 Mets 9–5 Koonce (4–3) Jenkins (12–7) Taylor (9) 36,795 58–36
96 July 18 @ Phillies 9–5 Regan (10–5) Wilson (2–3) 16,751 59–36
97 July 19 @ Phillies 5–3 Wise (7–8) Hands (11–8) 4,801 59–37
98 July 20 @ Phillies 1–0 Jenkins (13–7) Jackson (9–10) N/A 60–37
99 July 20 @ Phillies 6–1 Selma (10–4) Champion (3–5) 12,393 61–37
100 July 24 Dodgers 5–3 Holtzman (12–5) Sutton (12–10) Regan (10) 26,476 62–37
101 July 25 Dodgers 4–2 Osteen (13–8) Jenkins (13–8) Brewer (16) 20,844 62–38
102 July 26 Dodgers 3 – 2 11 Regan (11–5) Brewer (3–4) 29,172 63–38
103 July 27 Dodgers 6–2 Drysdale (5–3) Jenkins (13–9) Mikkelsen (1) 30,291 63–39
104 July 28 Giants 4 – 3 10 Nye (2–4) Marichal (13–6) 9,439 64–39
105 July 29 Giants 4–2 Linzy (9–6) Abernathy (4–3) 34,008 64–40
106 July 30 Giants 6–3 Perry (13–7) Nye (2–5) 31,642 64–41
107 July 31 Giants 12–2 Jenkins (14–9) Bolin (5–7) 24,168 65–41
August: 18–11 (Home: 7–7 ; Away: 11–4)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
108 August 1 Padres 5–2 Hands (12–8) Kirby (3–14) Regan (11) 16,921 66–41
109 August 2 Padres 4–1 Holtzman (13–5) Santorini (4–10) 26,984 67–41
110 August 3 Padres 4–3 Selma (11–4) J. Niekro (6–8) Regan (12) 32,566 68–41
111 August 4 @ Astros 9–3 Jenkins (15–9) Griffin (7–5) 31,722 69–41
112 August 5 @ Astros 5–2 Hands (13–8) Lemaster (8–11) Regan (13) 26,041 70–41
113 August 6 @ Astros 5–4 Nye (3–5) Billingham (4–6) Selma (1) 29,449 71–41
114 August 8 @ Dodgers 5–0 Singer (14–7) Jenkins (15–10) 35,173 71–42
115 August 9 @ Dodgers 4–0 Hands (14–8) Foster (3–7) 48,748 72–42
116 August 10 @ Dodgers 4–2 Sutton (14–11) Holtzman (13–6) Mikkelsen (2) 27,595 72–43
117 August 12 @ Padres 4–0 Jenkins (16–10) Santorini (4–12) 9,794 73–43
118 August 13 @ Padres 4–2 Hands (15–8) J. Niekro (6–10) 9,625 74–43
119 August 15 @ Giants 3–0 Marichal (14–8) Holtzman (13–7) 12,224 74–44
120 August 16 @ Giants 3–0 Jenkins (17–10) Perry (15–9) 16,236 75–44
121 August 17 @ Giants 5–3 Linzy (10–6) Hands (15–9) N/A 75–45
122 August 17 @ Giants 3–1 Selma (12–4) Bryant (2–1) Regan (14) 25,586 76–45
123 August 19 Braves 3–0 Holtzman (14–7) P. Niekro (16–11) 37,514 77–45
124 August 20 Braves 6–2 Reed (12–8) Jenkins (17–11) 34,709 77–46
125 August 21 Braves 3–1 Britton (7–4) Hands (15–10) 29,866 77–47
126 August 22 Astros 8–2 Dierker (16–9) Selma (12–5) 19,897 77–48
127 August 23 Astros 11–5 Holtzman (15–7) Gladding (2–4) 27,665 78–48
128 August 24 Astros 10–9 Regan (12–5) Gladding (2–5) Aguirre (1) N/A 79–48
129 August 24 Astros 3–2 Wilson (16–8) Johnson (0–2) 40,439 79–49
130 August 25 Reds 9–8 Nolan (4–5) Hands (15–11) Ramos (2) 30,479 79–50
131 August 26 Reds 8–7 Merritt (15–5) Selma (12–6) Granger (17) 31,473 79–51
132 August 27 Reds 6–3 Cloninger (9–14) Holtzman (15–8) Carroll (7) 31,867 79–52
133 August 28 Reds 3–1 Jenkins (18–11) Arrigo (2–6) 29,092 80–52
134 August 29 @ Braves 2–1 Hands (16–11) Jarvis (10–9) 36,413 81–52
135 August 30 @ Braves 5–4 Johnson (1–2) Reed (13–9) Regan (15) 26,630 82–52
136 August 31 @ Braves 8–4 Holtzman (16–8) P. Niekro (18–12) Regan (16) 33,142 83–52
September: 8–17 (Home: 4–7 ; Away: 4–10)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
137 September 2 @ Reds 8–2 Jenkins (19–11) Cloninger (9–15) 11,604 84–52
138 September 3 @ Reds 2–0 Maloney (8–4) Hands (16–12) 5,960 84–53
139 September 5 Pirates 9–2 Blass (14–8) Holtzman (16–9) 10,411 84–54
140 September 6 Pirates 13–4 Veale (11–11) Jenkins (19–12) 24,566 84–55
141 September 7 Pirates 7 – 5 11 Dal Canton (8–2) Johnson (1–3) 28,698 84–56
142 September 8 @ Mets 3–2 Koosman (13–9) Hands (16–13) 43,274 84–57
143 September 9 @ Mets 7–1 Seaver (21–7) Jenkins (19–13) 51,448 84–58
144 September 10 @ Phillies 6–2 Wise (13–11) Holtzman (16–10) 4,164 84–59
145 September 11 @ Phillies 4–3 James (1–0) Selma (12–7) Jackson (1) 4,255 84–60
146 September 12 @ Cardinals 5–1 Hands (17–13) Taylor (7–3) 31,717 85–60
147 September 13 @ Cardinals 7–4 Grant (8–11) Jenkins (19–14) Hoerner (15) 46,548 85–61
148 September 14 @ Cardinals 2 – 1 10 Gibson (18–11) Holtzman (16–11) 43,764 85–62
149 September 15 @ Expos 8–2 Wegener (5–12) Selma (12–8) 12,011 85–63
150 September 16 @ Expos 5–4 Hands (18–13) Robertson (5–14) Regan (17) 5,216 86–63
151 September 17 Phillies 9–7 Jenkins (20–14) Champion (5–10) Nye (3) 6,062 87–63
152 September 18 Phillies 5–3 Jackson (13–16) Regan (12–6) 5,796 87–64
153 September 19 Cardinals 2 – 1 10 Holtzman (17–11) Gibson (18–12) N/A 88–64
154 September 19 Cardinals 7–2 Torrez (9–4) Selma (12–9) 15,376 88–65
155 September 20 Cardinals 4–1 Carlton (17–10) Hands (18–14) Grant (7) 28,194 88–66
156 September 21 Cardinals 4–3 Jenkins (21–14) Taylor (7–5) 28,287 89–66
157 September 23 Expos 7–3 Stoneman (11–18) Holtzman (17–12) 3,047 89–67
158 September 24 Expos 6–3 Hands (19–14) Renko (6–7) 2,217 90–67
159 September 26 @ Pirates 2–0 Ellis (11–17) Jenkins (21–15) 4,973 90–68
160 September 27 @ Pirates 4–1 Blass (16–10) Holtzman (17–13) Moose (4) 4,157 90–69
161 September 28 @ Pirates 3–1 Hands (20–14) Veale (13–14) 24,435 91–69
October: 1–1 (Home: 1–1 ; Away: 0–0)
# Date Opponent Score Win Loss Save Attendance Record
162 October 1 Mets 6 – 5 12 Taylor (9–4) Selma (12–10) Johnson (1) 10,136 91–70
163 October 2 Mets 5–3 Decker (1–0) Cardwell (8–10) 9,981 92–70
Legend:        = Win        = Loss        = Tie        = Postponement
Bold = Cubs team member

Player stats

[9]

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos. = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; R = Runs; H = Hits; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in; Avg. = Batting average; SB = Stolen bases

Pos. Player G AB R H Avg. HR RBI SB
C Randy Hundley 151 522 67 133 .255 18 64 2
1B Ernie Banks 155 565 60 143 .253 23 106 0
2B Glenn Beckert 131 543 69 158 .273 4 53 6
3B Ron Santo 160 575 97 166 .289 29 123 1
SS Don Kessinger 158 664 109 181 .273 4 53 11
OF Billy Williams 163 642 103 188 .293 21 95 3
OF Don Young 101 272 36 65 .239 6 27 1
OF Jim Hickman 134 338 38 80 .237 21 54 2

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
Willie Smith 103 195 48 .246 9 25
Al Spangler 82 213 45 .211 4 23
Paul Popovich 60 154 48 .312 1 14
Nate Oliver 44 44 7 .159 1 4
Jim Qualls 43 120 30 .250 0 9
Adolfo Phillips 28 49 11 .224 0 1
Oscar Gamble 24 71 16 .225 1 5
Bill Heath 27 32 5 .156 0 1
Ken Rudolph 27 34 7 .206 1 6
Gene Oliver 23 27 6 .222 0 0
Jimmie Hall 11 24 5 .208 0 1
Rick Bladt 10 13 2 .154 0 1
Manny Jiménez 6 6 1 .167 0 0
Johnny Hairston 3 4 1 .250 0 0
Randy Bobb 3 2 0 .000 0 0
Charley Smith 2 2 0 .000 0 0

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Ferguson Jenkins 43 311.1 21 15 3.21 273
Bill Hands 41 300.0 20 14 2.49 181
Ken Holtzman 39 261.1 17 13 3.58 176
Dick Selma 36 168.2 10 8 3.63 161
Archie Reynolds 2 7.1 0 1 2.45 4

Other pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Joe Niekro 4 19.1 0 1 3.72 7
Jim Colborn 6 14.2 1 0 3.07 4
Joe Decker 4 12.1 1 0 2.92 13
Dave Lemonds 2 4.2 0 1 3.86 0
Gary Ross 2 2.0 0 0 13.50 2

Relief pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV ERA SO
Phil Regan 71 12 6 17 3.70 56
Ted Abernathy 56 4 3 3 3.16 55
Hank Aguirre 41 1 0 1 2.60 19
Rich Nye 34 3 5 3 5.11 39
Don Nottebart 16 1 1 0 7.00 8
Ken Johnson 9 1 2 1 2.84 18
Alec Distaso 2 0 0 0 3.86 1

Awards and honors

League leaders

All-Stars

All-Star Game

Farm system

See also: Minor League Baseball

Level Team League Manager
AAA Tacoma Cubs Pacific Coast League Whitey Lockman
AA San Antonio Missions Texas League Jim Marshall
A Quincy Cubs Midwest League Walt Dixon
A-Short Season Huron Cubs Northern League Mel Wright
Rookie Caldwell Cubs Pioneer League George Freese

LEAGUE CHAMPIONS: Tacoma

Notes

  1. ^ a b Kuenster, John. Heartbreakers. ISBN 1-56663-366-4.
  2. ^ Dave Rosello at Baseball Reference
  3. ^ Manny Jiménez at Baseball-Reference
  4. ^ Charley Smith at Baseball Reference
  5. ^ "Box Score of Game played on Tuesday, April 8, 1969 at Wrigley Field". Baseball-almanac.com. Retrieved September 6, 2008.
  6. ^ "Box Score of Game played on Sunday, September 7, 1969 at Wrigley Field". Baseball-almanac.com. Retrieved September 6, 2008.
  7. ^ Cohen, Rich (July 7, 2014). "Where Are They Now: Catching up with Cubs legend Ernie Banks". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved January 10, 2020.
  8. ^ Feldmann, Doug (2006). Miracle Collapse: the 1969 Chicago Cubs. ISBN 9780803220263. Retrieved January 31, 2011.
  9. ^ a b c "1969 Chicago Cubs Batting, Pitching, & Fielding Statistics". Baseball Reference. Retrieved January 22, 2011.
  10. ^ James, Bill (2001). The Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract. New York: Free Press. p. 635. ISBN 0-684-80697-5.
  11. ^ Paul Popovich at Baseball Reference
  12. ^ Jim Todd at Baseball Reference
  13. ^ Pat Bourque at Baseball Reference

References