2023 Rugby World Cup final
Stade de France hosted the final
Event2023 Rugby World Cup
Date28 October 2023
VenueStade de France, Saint-Denis
Player of the matchPieter-Steph du Toit (South Africa)
RefereeWayne Barnes (England)[1]
Attendance80,065
WeatherCloudy
15 °C (59 °F)
82% humidity[2]
2019
2027

The 2023 Rugby World Cup final was a rugby union match played on 28 October 2023 at the Stade de France in Saint-Denis, France. It marked the culmination of the 2023 Rugby World Cup and was played between New Zealand and South Africa, with the latter winning by a single point to claim their fourth Webb Ellis Cup, becoming the first nation to do so.[3] South Africa became the first team to ever win back to back Rugby World Cup tournaments away from home, with Siya Kolisi the first ever captain to accomplish the away double.

New Zealand and South Africa last played in a Rugby World Cup final in 1995, which South Africa won 15–12. The two sides had met in five previous World Cup encounters with New Zealand winning three and South Africa winning two. This was the first time that both finalists had already lost a game during the World Cup. For New Zealand this was a record fifth appearance in a final, while South Africa made a fourth appearance and also entered having never lost in a final.[4] The final saw South Africa win a record fourth World Cup title, with both sides having already won the World Cup on three occasions.[3][5]

Route to the final

New Zealand Round South Africa
Pool A Pool stage Pool B
Opponent Result Opponent Result
 France 13–27 Match 1  Scotland 18–3
 Namibia 71–3 Match 2  Romania 76–0
 Italy 96–17 Match 3  Ireland 8–13
 Uruguay 73–0 Match 4  Tonga 49–18
Pos Team Pld W D L PF PA TF TA B Pts
1  France (H) 4 4 0 0 210 32 27 5 2 18
2  New Zealand 4 3 0 1 253 47 38 4 3 15
3  Italy 4 2 0 2 114 181 15 25 2 10
4  Uruguay 4 1 0 3 65 164 9 21 1 5
5  Namibia 4 0 0 4 37 255 3 37 0 0
Source: World Rugby
Rules for classification: Pool stage tiebreakers
(H) Host
Final standing
Pos Team Pld W D L PF PA TF TA B Pts
1  Ireland 4 4 0 0 190 46 27 5 3 19
2  South Africa 4 3 0 1 151 34 22 4 3 15
3  Scotland 4 2 0 2 146 71 21 10 2 10
4  Tonga 4 1 0 3 96 177 13 25 1 5
5  Romania 4 0 0 4 32 287 4 43 0 0
Source: World Rugby
Rules for classification: Pool stage tiebreakers
Opponent Result Knockout stage Opponent Result
 Ireland 28–24 Quarter-finals  France 29–28
 Argentina 44–6 Semi-finals  England 16–15

New Zealand

The winning team would receive the Webb Ellis Cup

New Zealand began their World Cup campaign with a defeat to hosts France in the opening match of the tournament.[6] They would put that result behind them as they went on to win by a considerable margin in all of their remaining pool matches to qualify for the knockout stage, with a 71–3 victory over Namibia,[7] 96–17 against Italy,[8] and 73–0 against Uruguay.[9] In the quarter-finals, New Zealand faced Pool B winners and number 1 ranked in the world Ireland, where they came out winners in a tight affair with a scoreline of 28–24.[10] In the semi-final at the Stade de France, New Zealand played Argentina, where The All Blacks defeated Los Pumas 44–6[11] to reach their fifth Rugby World Cup final, a record as they went ahead of Australia and England who had both reached four finals. The All Blacks were also looking for their record fourth Rugby World Cup title, having won in 1987 followed by victories in 2011 and 2015.

South Africa

Defending champions South Africa had reached what was their fourth Rugby World Cup final following a spell of tight margins in the lead up. The Springboks had managed to breeze through Pool B, where despite falling at the Ireland hurdle in a 13–8 defeat,[12] they secured victories over Scotland,[13] Romania,[14] and Tonga[15] to finish second in the pool and advance to the knockout stage. In the quarter-finals, they faced the hosts France, who had topped Pool A ahead of New Zealand. In a World Cup thriller at the Stade de France, South Africa overcame their French counterparts with a 29–28 victory.[16] In the semi-final, South Africa played England, in a repeat of the 2007 and 2019 final. In another tight affair in Saint-Denis, South Africa completed a comeback through a late Handré Pollard penalty to win 16–15[17] and advance to their fourth Rugby World Cup final where they would attempt to defend their trophy.

Match

Summary

First half

In the 2nd minute, New Zealand's Shannon Frizell received a yellow card for falling on top of the leg of Bongi Mbonambi. Mbonambi was forced off for the remainder of the match with a knee injury.[18] South Africa went on to take a 6–0 lead with two penalties converted by Handré Pollard before Richie Mo'unga scored for New Zealand with a penalty after 17 minutes. Pollard scored another penalty two minutes later to make it 9–3.[19] In the 28th minute, New Zealand's captain Sam Cane was given a yellow card for a high shoulder tackle to the head of South Africa's Jesse Kriel which was later upgraded to a red card after a bunker review.[20] Pollard scored another penalty in the 34th minute before Mo'unga replied with his second penalty to leave the score 12–6 at half-time.[21]

Second half

In the 45th minute, South African captain Siya Kolisi received a yellow card for a head high tackle on Ardie Savea which was also reviewed for a potential red card. On review, it remained a yellow card. In the 54th minute, New Zealand thought that they had scored a try. Aaron Smith went over the try line in the left corner. However, the TMO review showed that the ball had been knocked on by Ardie Savea before it was released from the initial lineout.[22] They did get a try in the 58th minute. Beauden Barrett went over the try line on the left after an offload from Mark Telea, Richie Mo'unga missed the conversion from the left that would have put New Zealand in front. With 7 minutes to go, Cheslin Kolbe received a yellow card for a deliberate knock on and New Zealand missed the critical penalty to seal their victory. South Africa held on to win 12–11 and claim their fourth World Cup title.[23]

Details

28 October 2023
21:00 CEST (UTC+2)
New Zealand 11–12 South Africa
Try: B. Barrett 58' m
Pen: Mo'unga (2/2) 17', 38'
ReportPen: Pollard (4/4) 3', 13', 19', 34'
Stade de France, Saint-Denis
Attendance: 80,065
Referee: Wayne Barnes (England)[24]
New Zealand
South Africa
FB 15 Beauden Barrett
RW 14 Will Jordan downward-facing red arrow 71'
OC 13 Rieko Ioane
IC 12 Jordie Barrett
LW 11 Mark Telea
FH 10 Richie Mo'unga downward-facing red arrow 75'
SH 9 Aaron Smith downward-facing red arrow 66'
N8 8 Ardie Savea
OF 7 Sam Cane (c) Red card 27'
BF 6 Shannon Frizell Yellow card 2' downward-facing red arrow 55'
RL 5 Scott Barrett
LL 4 Brodie Retallick downward-facing red arrow 71'
TP 3 Tyrel Lomax downward-facing red arrow 66'
HK 2 Codie Taylor downward-facing red arrow 66'
LP 1 Ethan de Groot downward-facing red arrow 66'
Replacements:
HK 16 Samisoni Taukei'aho upward-facing green arrow 66'
PR 17 Tamaiti Williams upward-facing green arrow 66'
PR 18 Nepo Laulala upward-facing green arrow 66'
LK 19 Sam Whitelock upward-facing green arrow 55'
FL 20 Dalton Papalii upward-facing green arrow 71'
SH 21 Finlay Christie upward-facing green arrow 66'
FB 22 Damian McKenzie upward-facing green arrow 75'
CE 23 Anton Lienert-Brown upward-facing green arrow 71'
Coach:
New Zealand Ian Foster
FB 15 Damian Willemse downward-facing red arrow 66'
RW 14 Kurt-Lee Arendse
OC 13 Jesse Kriel
IC 12 Damian de Allende
LW 11 Cheslin Kolbe Yellow card 73'
FH 10 Handré Pollard
SH 9 Faf de Klerk
N8 8 Duane Vermeulen downward-facing red arrow 58'
BF 7 Pieter-Steph du Toit
OF 6 Siya Kolisi (c) Yellow card 45' downward-facing red arrow 73'
RL 5 Franco Mostert downward-facing red arrow 52'
LL 4 Eben Etzebeth downward-facing red arrow 58'
TP 3 Frans Malherbe downward-facing red arrow 66'
HK 2 Bongi Mbonambi downward-facing red arrow 4'
LP 1 Steven Kitshoff downward-facing red arrow 52'
Replacements:
HK 16 Deon Fourie upward-facing green arrow 4'
PR 17 Ox Nché upward-facing green arrow 52'
PR 18 Trevor Nyakane upward-facing green arrow 66'
LK 19 Jean Kleyn upward-facing green arrow 58'
LK 20 RG Snyman upward-facing green arrow 52'
FL 21 Kwagga Smith upward-facing green arrow 58'
N8 22 Jasper Wiese upward-facing green arrow 73'
FB 23 Willie le Roux upward-facing green arrow 66'
Coach:
South Africa Jacques Nienaber

Player of the Match:
Pieter-Steph du Toit (South Africa)[25]

Assistant referees:
Karl Dickson (England)[24]
Matthew Carley (England)[24]
Television match official:
Tom Foley (England)[24]
Reserve official:
Luke Pearce (England)[24]

Notes:

Statistics

Overall[34]
New Zealand South Africa
Tries 1 0
Conversions 0 0
Penalties
(attempts)
2(3) 4(4)
Drop goals
(attempts)
0(0) 0(4)
Match stats
Territory 53% 47%
Possession 60% 40%
Attacking
Metres made 459 360
Offloads 5 7
Carries crossed gainline 66 37
Kicks from hand 34 38
Passes 221 84
Runs 149 85
Defending
Tackles 92 209
Tackles missed 14 37
Turnovers won 2 7
Rucks won 115 56
Mauls won 3 2
Set pieces
Scrums
(won/lost)
(2/0) (10/1)
Line-outs
(won/lost)
(20/2) (6/4)
Discipline
Yellow cards 1 2
Red cards 1 0
Penalties conceded 5 10

See also

References

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  8. ^ Rindl, Joe (29 September 2023). "All Blacks move to cusp of Rugby World Cup quarter-finals". BBC Sport. Retrieved 24 October 2023.
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  11. ^ Mann, Mantej (20 October 2023). "All Blacks cruise into record fifth final". BBC Sport. Retrieved 24 October 2023.
  12. ^ Gault, Matt (23 September 2023). "Irish earn statement World Cup win over holders in Paris". BBC Sport. Retrieved 24 October 2023.
  13. ^ Duncan, Thomas (10 September 2023). "Springboks too strong for Scots in Rugby World Cup opener". BBC Sport. Retrieved 24 October 2023.
  14. ^ Rindl, Joe (17 September 2023). "Cobus Reinach scores second-fastest World Cup hat-trick". BBC Sport. Retrieved 24 October 2023.
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