Chatrapati of the Marathas
Marāṭhyānche Chatrapatī
Federal
Seal
First to reign
Shivaji I
6 June 1674 – 3 April 1680
Details
StyleHis Majesty
First monarchShivaji I
Last monarchPratap Singh
Formation1674
Abolition1818
Residence

Chhatrapati is a royal title from Sanskrit used to denote a monarch or imperial head of state. The word "Chhatrapati" is a Sanskrit language compound word of chhatra (parasol or umbrella) and pati (master/lord/ruler).[1] This title was used by the House of Bhonsle, between 1674 and 1818, as the heads of state of the Maratha Confederacy.

The states of Satara and Kolhapur came into being in 1707, because of the succession dispute over the royalty. Shahuji, the heir apparent to the Maratha empire, captured by the Mughals at the age of nine, remained their prisoner at the death of his father Sambhaji, the elder son of Shivaji the founder of the Maratha Empire, in 1689. The dowager Maharani Tarabai (wife of Rajaram I) proclaimed her son Shivaji II, as Chhatrapati under her regency. The Mughals released Shahu under certain conditions in 1707, and he returned to claim his inheritance. He defeated the regent at the Battle of Khed and established himself at Satara, forcing her to retire with her son to Kolhapur. By 1710 two separate principalities had become an established fact. Shivaji II and Tarabai were soon deposed by the other wife of Rajaram, Rajasbai. She installed her own son, Sambhaji II, as the new ruler of Kolhapur. Sambhaji II signed the Treaty of Warana in 1731 with his cousin Shahuji to formalize the two separate seats of Bhonsle family.[2]

Initial Chhatrapatis

This is the list of the initial Chhatrapatis.

Portrait Chhatrapati Birth Reign Death
Shivaji I 19 February 1630[3] 6 June 1674 – 5 April 1680 5 April 1680
Sambhaji 14 May 1657 16 January 1681 – 11 March 1689 11 March 1689
Rajaram I 24 February 1670 11 March 1689 – 3 March 1700 3 March 1700
Shivaji II 9 June 1696 1700–1707, 1710 – 2 August 1714 (Kolhapur State) 14 March 1726
Shahu I 18 May 1682 12 January 1708 – 15 December 1749 15 December 1749

Chhatrapatis of Satara

This is the list of the Chhatrapatis of Satara.[4]

Portrait Chhatrapati Birth Reign Death
Shahu I 18 May 1682 12 January 1708 – 15 December 1749 15 December 1749
Rajaram II June 1726 15 December 1749 – 11 December 1777 11 December 1777
Shahu II 1763 11 December 1777 – 3 May 1808 3 May 1808
Pratapsingh 18 January 1793 1818 – 5 September 1839 14 October 1847
Shahaji 1802 5 September 1839 – 5 April 1848 5 April 1848
Venkataji 1848–1864
Pratapsinha II / Rajaram II 1865–1874
Rajaram III 1874–1904
Anna Sahib 1904–1919
Bhav Sahib / Bhausaheb 1914–1925
Shahu III 1925–1950
Pratapsingh III 1950–?
Udayanraje 24 February 1966 ?–present
Source:[5]

Chhatrapatis of Kolhapur

This is the list of the Chhatrapatis of Kolhapur.[4]

Portrait Chhatrapati Birth Reign Death
Shivaji II 9 June 1696 1700–1707, 1710–1714 (Kolhapur State) 14 March 1726
Sambhaji II 1698 1714–1760 18 December 1760
Shivaji III 1756 22 September 1762 – 24 April 1813 24 April 1813
Sambhaji III 1801 24 April 1813 – 2 July 1821 2 July 1821
Shivaji IV 1816 July 02 1821 – Jan 03 1822 January 03, 1822
Shahaji I 22 January 1802 3 January 1822 – 29 November 1838 29 November 1838
Shivaji V 26 December 1830 1838–1866 4 August 1866
Rajaram II April 13, 1850 August 18, 1866 – November 30, 1870 November 30, 1870
Shivaji VI April 05, 1863 1871–1883 December 25, 1883
Shahu IV (overall)
Shahu I of Kolhapur
26 June 1874 2 April 1894 – 6 May 1922 6 May 1922
Rajaram III 31 July 1897 1922–1940 26 November 1940
Shivaji VII 22 November 1941 31 December 1941 – 28 September 1946 28 September 1946
Shahaji II 4 April 1910 1947–1971 9 May 1983
Shahu V (overall)
Shahu II of Kolhapur
7 January 1948 1983–present
Genealogy of Kolhapur Chhatrapatis

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Fairey, Jack; Farrell, Brian P. (2018-06-28). Empire in Asia: A New Global History: From Chinggisid to Qing. Bloomsbury Publishing. ISBN 978-1-4725-9123-4.
  2. ^ Sailendra, Sen (2013-01-01). Textbook of medieval Indian history. Primus Books. ISBN 9789380607344. OCLC 822894456.
  3. ^ Indu Ramchandani, ed. (2000). Student's Britannica: India (Set of 7 Vols.) 39. Popular Prakashan. p. 8. ISBN 978-0-85229-760-5.
  4. ^ a b Maheshwari, K. K. & K. W. Wiggins (1989). Maratha Mints and Coinage, Nashik: Indian Institute of Research in Numismatic Studies, pp. 205–6.
  5. ^ "The Marathas: Post Shahu Chatrapatis of Satara".

References