Grimsby
Town of Grimsby
Grimsby, Ontario panorama.jpg
Coat of arms of Grimsby
Grimsby is located in Regional Municipality of Niagara
Grimsby
Grimsby
Grimsby is located in Southern Ontario
Grimsby
Grimsby
Coordinates: 43°12′N 79°33′W / 43.200°N 79.550°W / 43.200; -79.550Coordinates: 43°12′N 79°33′W / 43.200°N 79.550°W / 43.200; -79.550
CountryCanada
ProvinceOntario
Regional Municipality Niagara
Settled1790
Government
 • TypeTown
 • MayorJeff A. Jordan
 • Governing BodyTown of Grimsby Council
 • MPDean Allison (CPC)
 • MPPSam Oosterhoff (PC)
Area
 • Land68.93 km2 (26.61 sq mi)
Population
 (2016)[1]
 • Total27,314
 • Density396.3/km2 (1,026/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC-5 (EST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
Forward Sortation Area
Area code(s)905/289/365
Highways Queen Elizabeth Way
Websitewww.grimsby.ca

Grimsby is a town on Lake Ontario in the Niagara Region, Ontario, Canada. Grimsby is a part of the Hamilton Census Metropolitan Area.[2] It is named after the English fishing town of Grimsby in north-east Lincolnshire. The majority of residents reside in the area bounded by Lake Ontario and the Niagara Escarpment, home to a section of the Bruce Trail.[3]

Grimsby has experienced significant growth over the past decade as the midpoint between Hamilton and St. Catharines. Growth is limited by the natural boundaries of Lake Ontario and the Niagara Escarpment. Some residents feel development is detrimental to the town as orchards close to the town centre are used for residential development; however, most of the orchards in Grimsby were replaced by houses between the 1950s and 1980s and very few orchards remain.[4]

According to a late 2019 report, the town has 33 small parks, 17 larger and "many more green spaces, sport fields, parkettes, trails, and facilities".[5] Some notable attractions in Grimsby are the Grimsby Museum,[6] the Grimsby Public Library,[7] the Grimsby Public Art Gallery,[8] the West Niagara YMCA, the Danish Church, and the hockey arena (Peach King Centre), home of the Grimsby Peach Kings.

History

Sunset over Lake Ontario
Sunset over Lake Ontario
Nelles Manor, completed in 1798
Nelles Manor, completed in 1798

The Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation were the first people who lived on Grimsby's land.[9] However, a group of United Empire Loyalists from Great Britain settled on the land (originally named Township Number 6 and then 'The Forty'), to make Grimsby be 'founded' in 1790. Robert Nelles, a politician and later lieutenant-colonel in the War of 1812, was one of the town's founders. His home on Main Street West was used for many planning sessions during the war. In 1816 the settlement became known as Grimsby, the name of the surrounding township, in memory of the seaport town of Grimsby in North East Lincolnshire, England. It is still there to this day.[5]

The Village of Grimsby was officially incorporated in 1876 and became a town in 1922. The community has gone through many changes, from being a small rural village; to a centre for the manufacture of farm machinery, hospital furniture, furnaces and other metal products; and later the hub of the Niagara Peninsula's fruit-growing industry. Grimsby also had a successful fishing industry which lasted until the 1960s. The Town of Grimsby and the Township of North Grimsby were amalgamated in 1970 with the formation of the Regional Municipality of Niagara. With a number of wineries and distilleries, Grimsby now serves as the starting point for touring the Niagara wine region.

Two of the remaining cottages in the Grimsby Park area
Two of the remaining cottages in the Grimsby Park area

Canada's first Chautauqua-like organization (a Methodist camp) was established in 1859 in Grimsby Park on land donated by J.B. Bowslaugh; colourful cottages were later built and some visitors spent entire summers in the area. Two hotels and a temple were also built. Over 50,000 visited in 1884 but by 1900 interest had declined. By 1909 the Grimsby Park Company was bankrupt and the property was sold for use as an amusement park. The temple and hotels were destroyed in the 1920s. In 1910, the amusement park's first owner, Harry Wylie, added carousels, a motion picture theater, and a roller coaster. Canada Steamship Lines bought out the business in 1916, but the park declined through the 1920s, mainly due to multiple fires that consumed many of the wooden buildings. Operation had ceased by 1950 and the land was sold to developers who built cottages.[10] Many of the colourful cottages were destroyed by fire or demolished over the years but some remain to this day.[11][12] As of 2019, Grimsby Pier, where ferries and steamships had once docked, was in a state of disrepair; the mayor said he hoped that it could be restored.[13]

In 2011, Grimsby was struck by an F0 Tornado.[14]

Grimsby is also the birthplace of a Hollywood director, Del Lord. He rose to acclaim as the director of most of the Three Stooges short vaudeville comedies. Later, under Columbia Pictures, he also directed nearly 200 feature films.[15]

Local government

Grimsby Welcome Sign
Grimsby Welcome Sign
Nelles-Fitch House, c. 1791
Nelles-Fitch House, c. 1791
Nelles merchant shop, c. 1800
Nelles merchant shop, c. 1800
Grimsby old stone shop, c. 1800
Grimsby old stone shop, c. 1800
Aerial view of Grimsby
Aerial view of Grimsby
The Former Grimsby Public Library
The Former Grimsby Public Library

Grimsby Town Council is composed of a Mayor and eight Councillors who serve for a term of four years. The Mayor is elected at large and the Councillors are elected by ward. The town is divided into four wards with two Councillors elected in each ward. It is the role of Council to represent the public and to consider the well-being and interests of the municipality; to develop and evaluate policies and programs; to determine which services the municipality provides; to ensure administrative practices and procedures are in place to implement the decisions of Council; and to maintain the financial integrity of the municipality. The Council generally meets on the first and third Mondays of each month. All meetings are open to the public and are also televised live on the local Government-access television (GATV) cable TV channel.[16]

The current council (2018-2022 term) was sworn in on December 3, 2018, with the following members:

Mayor
Town Council Members Ward 1
Town Council Members Ward 2
Town Council Members Ward 3
Town Council Members Ward 4

Source:[18]

The Regional Municipality of Niagara is an upper-tier municipality that encompasses all municipalities in Niagara Region. On Niagara Regional Council, Grimsby is represented by the Mayor and by an elected Regional Councillor, currently Wayne Fertich.[19]

Standing Committees

Council has appointed four standing Committees as follows:[20]

Transportation

Bisecting the town is the Queen Elizabeth Way, one of the 400-series highways. It has three interchanges in the town, with Casablanca Boulevard in the west, a central interchange for three roads (Christie Street, Ontario Street, and Maple Avenue), and Bartlett Avenue in the east.

The Grimsby railway station, on the south side of the railway tracks west of Ontario Street and south of Queen Elizabeth Way, is served by the Maple Leaf train jointly operated by Via Rail and Amtrak. A GO Transit train station is planned for operation on the Lakeshore West line, was expected to open in 2021 as part of the Lakeshore West Line, and was halted as of late 2018.[21] Of three sites for the Grimsby GO Station evaluated by Metrolinx, the Crown agency that operates GO Transit, the preferred site for the proposed station is west of and adjacent to Casablanca Boulevard.[13]

In August 2020, Niagara Region Transit launched a two-year pilot to provide on-demand local and regional transit service for Grimsby and other nearby communities.[22][23]

Schools

Secondary schools

Primary schools

Churches

St. Andrew's Anglican Church, completed in 1825
St. Andrew's Anglican Church, completed in 1825

Grimsby Public Library

Grimsby Public Library and Art Gallery
Grimsby Public Library and Art Gallery

The first library in Grimsby was opened in 1871 in the home of Grimsby councillor Sam Mabey, housing a collection of 1,000 books.[35] Following a recommendation of the town council, the village struck a committee to approach the Andrew Carnegie Foundation to request new funds to build a new library. The foundation allocated $8,000 to build the new library building.[35] In 1975, the library was expanded to include a new building, which inaugurated a Grimsby Public Art Gallery in the basement of the library. A few years later, the Klosso Eloul sculpture 'Double is One' was installed on the grounds.[35] In 2004, a new building was constructed adjacent to the original structure to house both the library and art gallery. The original structure itself contains the Grimsby Archives.[35]

Grimsby Beach

Grimsby beach is home to "Gingerbread Houses" [36]that are painted by owners in bright colours and flourishes for an eye-catching addition to the area.

Demographics

Grimsby Historical populations
YearPop.±%
1871800—    
19011,001+25.1%
19111,669+66.7%
19212,004+20.1%
19312,198+9.7%
19412,331+6.1%
19512,773+19.0%
19615,148+85.6%
197115,770+206.3%
198115,797+0.2%
199118,520+17.2%
200121,297+15.0%
200623,937+12.4%
201125,325+5.8%
201627,314+7.9%

In the 2021 Census of Population conducted by Statistics Canada, Grimsby had a population of 28,883 living in 11,395 of its 11,626 total private dwellings, a change of 5.7% from its 2016 population of 27,314. With a land area of 68.71 km2 (26.53 sq mi), it had a population density of 420.4/km2 (1,088.7/sq mi) in 2021.[37]

Age characteristics of Grimsby (2016)[1] Total Male Female
Total - All persons 27,315 13,315 14,000
Age 0-14 4,750 2,485 2,270
Age 15-64 17,300 8,440 8,860
Age 65-84 5,265 2,390 2,870

Notable people

Main page: Category:People from Grimsby, Ontario

Climate

Grimsby's climate varies throughout the year; 12 °C – 15 °C in the spring, 21 °C – 33 °C in the summer, and 10 °C – 17 °C in the fall. Temperatures in the winter months are around 4 °C to −16 °C, with about 190 cm of snow per year.

Climate data for Grimsby
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 19.4
(66.9)
17.2
(63.0)
26.1
(79.0)
30.6
(87.1)
36.1
(97.0)
36.1
(97.0)
40.6
(105.1)
39.4
(102.9)
37.8
(100.0)
31.7
(89.1)
26.1
(79.0)
21.0
(69.8)
40.6
(105.1)
Average high °C (°F) −1.6
(29.1)
−0.4
(31.3)
4.6
(40.3)
11.6
(52.9)
18.3
(64.9)
24.0
(75.2)
26.8
(80.2)
25.9
(78.6)
21.2
(70.2)
14.7
(58.5)
8.1
(46.6)
2.0
(35.6)
12.9
(55.2)
Daily mean °C (°F) −4.8
(23.4)
−3.9
(25.0)
0.9
(33.6)
7.1
(44.8)
13.1
(55.6)
18.8
(65.8)
21.9
(71.4)
21.2
(70.2)
17.0
(62.6)
10.9
(51.6)
5.1
(41.2)
−1.0
(30.2)
8.9
(48.0)
Average low °C (°F) −8.2
(17.2)
−7.5
(18.5)
−2.8
(27.0)
2.5
(36.5)
7.7
(45.9)
13.6
(56.5)
17.0
(62.6)
16.5
(61.7)
12.8
(55.0)
7.0
(44.6)
2.0
(35.6)
−4
(25)
4.7
(40.5)
Record low °C (°F) −25
(−13)
−26.1
(−15.0)
−21.7
(−7.1)
−16.1
(3.0)
−2.8
(27.0)
2.2
(36.0)
6.7
(44.1)
4.4
(39.9)
0.0
(32.0)
−7.2
(19.0)
−13.9
(7.0)
−27.2
(−17.0)
−27.2
(−17.0)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 68.5
(2.70)
60.3
(2.37)
71.5
(2.81)
77.0
(3.03)
69.2
(2.72)
83.0
(3.27)
56.8
(2.24)
86.1
(3.39)
92.2
(3.63)
64.6
(2.54)
68.9
(2.71)
82.1
(3.23)
880.3
(34.66)
Average rainfall mm (inches) 22.3
(0.88)
28.8
(1.13)
53.3
(2.10)
70.7
(2.78)
69.2
(2.72)
83.0
(3.27)
56.8
(2.24)
86.1
(3.39)
92.2
(3.63)
64.0
(2.52)
64.5
(2.54)
48.3
(1.90)
739.2
(29.10)
Average snowfall cm (inches) 46.2
(18.2)
32.1
(12.6)
18.2
(7.2)
6.3
(2.5)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.6
(0.2)
4.4
(1.7)
33.8
(13.3)
141.6
(55.7)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.2 mm) 13 11 12 12 11 9 8 10 10 11 12 13 132
Average rainy days (≥ 0.2 mm) 4 4 8 11 11 9 8 10 10 11 10 6 102
Average snowy days (≥ 0.2 cm) 9 7 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 8 31
Source: Environment Canada[38]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c "2016 Census Profile: Grimsby, Ontario". Statistics Canada. Archived from the original on September 10, 2018. Retrieved June 23, 2019.
  2. ^ Canada, Government of Canada, Statistics. "2011 Census Profile". www12.statcan.ca. Archived from the original on July 27, 2020.
  3. ^ "Welcome! - Bruce Trail". The Bruce Trail Conservancy. Archived from the original on July 27, 2020.
  4. ^ "Grimsby Historical Society". Archived from the original on July 27, 2020.
  5. ^ a b "Grimsby Thinking Ahead". 7 November 2019. Archived from the original on July 27, 2020.
  6. ^ "Museum". Town of Grimsby. Archived from the original on July 27, 2020. Retrieved July 20, 2020.
  7. ^ "Grimsby Public Library". Archived from the original on July 27, 2020. Retrieved June 23, 2019.
  8. ^ "Art Gallery". Town of Grimsby. Archived from the original on July 27, 2020.
  9. ^ "NativeLand.ca". Native-land.ca - Our home on native land. Retrieved 2020-11-18.
  10. ^ Brown, Ron (31 May 2010). From Queenston to Kingston: The Hidden Heritage of Lake Ontario's Shoreline. p. 43. ISBN 9781459704787. Archived from the original on 2020-06-06. Retrieved 2020-06-06.
  11. ^ "Grimsby Park and the ghost ship of Jordan Harbour". 4 June 2020.
  12. ^ "Grimsby's Chautauqua History". 21 September 2018. Archived from the original on 2019-06-23. Retrieved 2020-06-06.
  13. ^ a b "Grimsby Thinking Ahead". 7 November 2019. Archived from the original on 2020-06-06. Retrieved 2020-06-06.
  14. ^ "Grimsby, ON F0 Tornado of September 3, 2011". Highways & Hailstones. Retrieved 2020-08-01.
  15. ^ Foster, Charles (5 September 2016). Canadians in Golden Age Hollywood. ISBN 9781459738904. Archived from the original on 2020-06-06. Retrieved 2020-06-06.
  16. ^ "Mayor and Council". Town of Grimsby. Archived from the original on June 23, 2019. Retrieved June 23, 2019.
  17. ^ "About the Mayor". Town of Grimsby. Archived from the original on June 23, 2019. Retrieved June 23, 2019.
  18. ^ "Town Councillors". Town of Grimsby. Archived from the original on June 23, 2019. Retrieved June 23, 2019.
  19. ^ "Regional Councillors". Town of Grimsby. Archived from the original on June 23, 2019. Retrieved June 21, 2019.
  20. ^ "Standing Committees". Town of Grimsby. Archived from the original on June 23, 2019. Retrieved June 23, 2019.
  21. ^ LaFleche, Grant (2018-11-30). "Grimsby GO station plan 'will be stopped'". The Spec. Archived from the original on 2019-04-12.
  22. ^ "NRT OnDemand celebrates one year anniversary of service launch". Retrieved 14 September 2021.
  23. ^ "NRT OnDemand". Retrieved 14 September 2021.
  24. ^ "Grand Ave Public School". District School Board of Niagara. Archived from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  25. ^ "Lakeview Public School". District School Board of Niagara. Archived from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  26. ^ "Centennial Park Baptist Church". Archived from the original on 2009-06-03. Retrieved 2009-06-01.
  27. ^ "Canada: Grimsby" (in Danish). Danske Sømands- og Udlandskirker. Archived from the original on 2017-02-18. Retrieved 2020-07-27.
  28. ^ "Lakemount Worship Centre". Archived from the original on 2009-08-31. Retrieved 2009-06-01.
  29. ^ "Life at Mountainview". Mountainview Christian Reformed Church. Archived from the original on 2018-11-17. Retrieved 2020-07-27.
  30. ^ "New Life Community Church". Archived from the original on 2019-02-28. Retrieved 2020-07-27.
  31. ^ "St. Andrew's Church". Retrieved April 30, 2020.
  32. ^ "St. Andrew's Anglican Church". Ontario Heritage Trust. 8 December 2016. Archived from the original on June 23, 2019. Retrieved June 23, 2019.
  33. ^ "Ukrainian Orthodox Church of St. George". Archived from the original on June 11, 2020. Retrieved April 30, 2020.
  34. ^ "Trinity United Church". Archived from the original on January 18, 2019. Retrieved April 30, 2020.
  35. ^ a b c d "How it all got started" Archived 2018-11-20 at the Wayback Machine Grimsby Public Library, retrieved on 22 August 2017.
  36. ^ "History and Heritage". Retrieved 11 May 2022.
  37. ^ "Population and dwelling counts: Canada, provinces and territories, census divisions and census subdivisions (municipalities), Ontario". Statistics Canada. February 9, 2022. Retrieved March 30, 2022.
  38. ^ Environment CanadaClimate Normals for Grimsby 1961-1990 Archived 2012-12-16 at archive.today. Retrieved 18 March 2012.